LPN or RN?

  1. 0
    On my last question, I asked if there were any legitimite LPN to BSN programs and found that yes, they are real and credited. My ultimate goal is to become a Neonatal practioner:heartbeat, and I plan on taking accelerated programs to eventually get to my masters degree. I was wondering, would it be easier (Cheaper,less hassel) to become a LPN first then go into a bridge program to get my BSN, then get my speciality masters degree? Or, wait, become a RN, and then go on to a bridge program to get a general Masters then get my neonatal specialty? I am worried about the LPN programs being private (for profit) and expensive and worried about the difficulty of finding jobs after I graduate even though there are less steps involved. I'm just not sure what route I should take. In a month or two, I am becoming a CNA so I can save up money for school and since I will be paying for school myself, I want to know my options to avoid making mistakes. Thank you for your time
    Last edit by magichospital on Apr 3, '11 : Reason: forgot to mention something

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  2. 15 Comments...

  3. 0
    RN first. also there are plenty of RN to MSN programs as well.
  4. 1
    Yeah, I agree, go for the RN first. At my local CC the wait is less for the RN program (1.5 to 2 years) than it is for the LPN program. The counselor told me that it's because people don't want to take the harder courses like Micro, A&P I and II (the LPN program here only requires a body structure class). And then you have to work for 1 year as an LPN before you can do the bridge program. Meanwhile, you'd be an RN already working on your RN to BSN classes in that amount of time.
    magichospital likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from jennylouwho
    Yeah, I agree, go for the RN first. At my local CC the wait is less for the RN program (1.5 to 2 years) than it is for the LPN program. The counselor told me that it's because people don't want to take the harder courses like Micro, A&P I and II (the LPN program here only requires a body structure class). And then you have to work for 1 year as an LPN before you can do the bridge program. Meanwhile, you'd be an RN already working on your RN to BSN classes in that amount of time.

    when you say you have to have 1 year experience as an LPN before a bridge program do you mean All bridge programs or a specific one?At my CC it will take 1-2 years for preq. and while I am waiting after I apply to the program it will take me 1-2 to do my general ed.(being a full time student) where as the LPN program has the same waiting time(atleast in our area) and I could finish the preq. in less time and I was thinking about working while I get my Bach.? do you still think it would be worth it with the time allotment? Thanks
  6. 0
    Jennylouwho...could I ask where you are located? Trying to make decision on rn or lpn and if rn wait is shorter in Richmond! That would certainly help with my decision? Thanks!
  7. 0
    i applied for an lpn program because it is really tough to get into the rn program and i would have to take more prerequisites than the lpn program (which i already have--english 101 and physch 101). i would most likely get put on a waiting list for the rn program as i would probably have less "points" than many other applicants.

    the lpn program i applied to in rochester new york is offered by rochester general hospital, takes 10 months, and has aggreements with the local community college for an rn bridge program that only takes 1 year. unlike some other programs that were mentioned in this thread, you do not have to work as an lpn in order to do it.

    the school also has aggreements with a few local 4-year schools that have a lpn---bsn program (nazareth and soon-to-be program at brockport college). transfer students (rns) often find that there is a wait to take classes because the traditional students have priority. i'm trying to determine which route i will take. the university lpn--rn--bsn will be more expensive---but i am not getting any younger. the time it would take is 10 months in lpn school, and 3 years (or 2??) for the lpn---bsn program. so it would be about the same or actually less time for the lpn--bsn route versus the rn--bsn route--- especially if it is an accellerated program....and ofcourse next you go for your ms.

    more money= less time
    less money = more time and hassle
  8. 0
    LPN to BSN takes more time than RN and either way you still have to be an RN(either ADN or BSN) to get a MSN. its a waste of time to get an LPN IMO nowadays. Just take the damn classes. youre gonna have to take that time out one way or another. you only skip like one or two classes in the bridge programs anyways...and you would still have all the prereq classes to take before you can bridge.

    Bottom line...there is no quick and easy route to nursing. Do the RN then the RN to MSN
  9. 0
    Quote from slinkyheadcna
    lpn to bsn takes more time than rn and either way you still have to be an rn(either adn or bsn) to get a msn. its a waste of time to get an lpn imo nowadays. just take the damn classes. youre gonna have to take that time out one way or another. you only skip like one or two classes in the bridge programs anyways...and you would still have all the prereq classes to take before you can bridge.

    bottom line...there is no quick and easy route to nursing. do the rn then the rn to msn
    it would be best if i could get into the rn program first but i'm impatient. i don't want to wait for things. also i am graduating soon for another degree program and i just want to get right back into school (since i decided halfway through that i actually wanted to be a nurse instead). the lpn program is only 10 months and i wouldn't have to go on a 2 year waiting list. i would be a licensed practical nurse after only 10 months and it would be easier to get into the rn program and would only take 1 year to complete. the rn program takes 2 years anyway. so i wouldn''t be waisting any time---just spending more money. but some people feel that spending the extra money is worth it. plus the bsn program for lpns sounds good to me--i would only have to transfer once and also i could work in a doctors office part-time as an lpn. not sure though what i am going to do...

    oh--and i'm not considering getting a msn just yet--i was referring to the original poster's plans. a bsn is fine enough for me. then i will have to work to pay the loan back.
    Last edit by upstatenygirl on May 2, '11
  10. 0
    Im sorry...maybe I don't understand how thats less time. I get wanting to work as an LPN first but:

    LPN then LPN to BSN= LPN,10 mon then 1-2 yrs pre-reqs then 1 1/2 to 2 yrs LPN to BSN bridge= almost 3 to almost 5 yrs.

    RN= 1-2yrs prereqs then 1 1/2-2 yrs NS. OR Accelerated BSN= less than 1 yr pre-reqs and 1 yr NS.
    RN or Accelerated BSN= 2 to 3 yrs. (if you already have a degree)


    This is all assuming you're not dealing with waitlists which, believe it or not, not all NS have. Here in Las Vegas there are no waiting lists, completely merit based.
  11. 0
    lucky! we have waitlists and if you do not get bumped up tp acceptance because a few declined a seat, you will have to reapply the next year. also, they use a points system and it is really competitive.

    to get my rn i would only have to go to monroe community college for 1 year. so it would take 2 years (as normal) to get my rn.

    then after that i can transfer to a university for a bsn---which would be 2 yrs or less depending on the program. or i could go to nazareth directly after the lpn program to get my bsn.

    the reason people apply for an lpn program is because sometimes it is easier to get accepted and then you have only 1 yr to get your rn. less waiting.


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