Do not underestimate the difficulty level of nursing school... Do not underestimate the difficulty level of nursing school... - pg.7 | allnurses

Do not underestimate the difficulty level of nursing school... - page 7

As I am almost done with my first year of my ADN nursing program, I decided to write this article with some thoughts about where I was a year ago. I know I am being overly dramatic here, but hey... Read More

  1. Visit  tenjuna profile page
    #78 2
    It's been 3 years since I originally posted this, and wanted to give some updates to my journey and maybe some more helpful advice.

    A few weeks ago I finished my BSN, which I took online with Western Governors University (wgu.edu). I finished it in 9 months, and I followed my own previous advice with finding a balance between studying and life outside of school. I still spent 40-60 hours a week studying and doing class work, but I found by doing this time in restaurants, bars, and such outside of home I could still feel like I had a life while getting work accomplished. Not the ideal solution for everyone I know, but I didn't want to repeat sitting at the kitchen table for countless hours. I was also very lucky that the state of Iowa paid me a training stipend so that I didn't have to work during this 9 month period.

    In any event, I highly recommend getting your BSN as soon as you are able. 65% of nurses do not get their BSN or higher degrees, and frankly this is going to be a mandatory thing eventually. Just do it and get it over with. The BSN portion wasn't nearly as hard as the first 2 years was, at least for me.

    I have since changed course away from Orthopedics and OR nursing work and instead recently became an Informatics Nurse (deals with data analytics and electronic health record training). To that end I am starting a Masters in Informatics later this year, and then finally a Doctorate of Nursing Practice next year.

    It's somewhat amusing looking back and remembering how difficult the nursing program was 3 years ago, as now it's trivial...but I do still remember the horror of that first bad exam...I learned to not underestimate anything in nursing, and that memory has helped me many time in the last 3 years.

    The Critical Thinking book I linked previously is still hugely valuable to me in my daily practice. I have actually read that book many times over the years. I very highly recommend it.

    Otherwise there is some great advice in the comments, I encourage you to read through them all.

    I wish you all the best of luck in your nursing journey, and hopefully I will be updating this post again in 3 years as Dr. Cross.
  2. Visit  Emmasmom03 profile page
    #79 0
    It is funny as I was kind of the opposite. An a/b student before nursing school, but that was with no studying really. Maybe it is become I am/was a perpetual student, but nursing school, while it was challenging, was not that difficult. I found I just had to do the reading and actually listen in class. No notes taken throughout nursing school and I made all a's and b's.
  3. Visit  dorkypanda profile page
    #80 0
    Quote from tenjuna
    It's been 3 years since I originally posted this, and wanted to give some updates to my journey and maybe some more helpful advice.

    A few weeks ago I finished my BSN, which I took online with Western Governors University (wgu.edu). I finished it in 9 months, and I followed my own previous advice with finding a balance between studying and life outside of school. I still spent 40-60 hours a week studying and doing class work, but I found by doing this time in restaurants, bars, and such outside of home I could still feel like I had a life while getting work accomplished. Not the ideal solution for everyone I know, but I didn't want to repeat sitting at the kitchen table for countless hours. I was also very lucky that the state of Iowa paid me a training stipend so that I didn't have to work during this 9 month period.

    In any event, I highly recommend getting your BSN as soon as you are able. 65% of nurses do not get their BSN or higher degrees, and frankly this is going to be a mandatory thing eventually. Just do it and get it over with. The BSN portion wasn't nearly as hard as the first 2 years was, at least for me.

    I have since changed course away from Orthopedics and OR nursing work and instead recently became an Informatics Nurse (deals with data analytics and electronic health record training). To that end I am starting a Masters in Informatics later this year, and then finally a Doctorate of Nursing Practice next year.

    It's somewhat amusing looking back and remembering how difficult the nursing program was 3 years ago, as now it's trivial...but I do still remember the horror of that first bad exam...I learned to not underestimate anything in nursing, and that memory has helped me many time in the last 3 years.

    The Critical Thinking book I linked previously is still hugely valuable to me in my daily practice. I have actually read that book many times over the years. I very highly recommend it.

    Otherwise there is some great advice in the comments, I encourage you to read through them all.

    I wish you all the best of luck in your nursing journey, and hopefully I will be updating this post again in 3 years as Dr. Cross.
    woohoo! Congrats. I'm almost done with an ADN program and am contemplating doing rn to bsn online. Do you recommend wgu why or why not? What did you like or dislike about the program? Do you have any tips or info for future students who are thinking about doing rn to bsn with wgu? If you could redo your rn to bsn what would you do differently?how soon did you enroll in wgu after graduating from your nursing program?
  4. Visit  tenjuna profile page
    #81 0
    I very highly recommend WGU. It was cheap, it was fast, it was easy. I waited almost a whole year before starting though in hindsight I have no idea why I waited, it was very easy in comparison to the ADN.

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