confused undergrad student

  1. hi, I'm a 20-year-old junior biology major & all my life I was sure I wanted to be a doctor until I realized that it may not be the lifestyle for me. I have recently begun looking into advanced BSN programs. My school does not have a nursing program so I cant switch my major I'm kind of stuck with biology, I am already 60 + credits in so it is what it is. Now I know there are sooooooooooooo many different types of nursing and nursing jobs and I wanted to know if you guys could help me understand them. So far with the help of youtube and google, i have come across CRNA, NP, DNP and of course RN's. I wanted to know if u guys could explain to me in detail all those positions and any others that I don't know about. Thanks in advance .
    •  
  2. Visit jojo97 profile page

    About jojo97

    Joined: Dec '17; Posts: 7

    14 Comments

  3. by   Dadof2RN2Be
    There are several different degree options for nurses. I'll start with the lower level, and go up in terms of education required.

    ADN/ASN is a two year degree that upon successful completion of allows you to sit for the NCLEX exam which is required to be licensed as a RN.
    BSN is a four year degree that if you have not already sat for the NCLEX, allows you to do so.
    MSN is a graduate level degree, with all different subspecialities such as management, nursing informatics, education, etc.
    NP is a graduate level degree that allows you to practice as a mid-level provider. This can either be as a FNP (Family Nurse Practitioner) or as an ACNP (Acute Care Nurse Practitioner). FNP's are seen all throughout the health system as they are not as restrictive as an ACNP. ACNP's are scene mainly in acute care settings of a hospital such as ER/ICU. These are typically 18 months to 2 years post bachelor level education.
    DNP is a Doctorate level degree of a Nurse Practitioner. This is rumored to be soon required/replaced by the FNP/ACNP programs.
    CRNA is a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist. As far as I understand, it is a mid-level provider in the anesthesiology world of healthcare.

    Hope this helps!
  4. by   jojo97
    Okay thank you so much for the clarification .
  5. by   ~♪♫ in my ♥~
    Finish your BS and then get into nursing school at either the AS, BS, or MS level. Once you've finished, take the NCLEX. Then, presuming that you pass and that you don't have disqualifications in your background, you'll be a licensed nurse.

    There are some FNP programs that will take you directly though, in my opinion, it's ridiculous to think that one can become a provider without ever having worked with patients. To become a CRNA, you generally have to have at least 2 years of critical care nursing experience.
  6. by   Dadof2RN2Be
    Anytime! Glad to help! Good luck on your journey!
  7. by   jojo97
    Thank you
  8. by   meanmaryjean
    Just because you are 60 credits into a Bio degree, does not mean you have to finish it. Start looking around for BSN and / or ADN programs - you likely have most of the prerequisites completed.
  9. by   jojo97
    Okay I will look into this. Thanks
  10. by   Miiki
    Just to point out...

    Once you complete a bachelor's degree, you won't be eligible for federal student aid for any additional undergraduate coursework. If you plan on attending an ASN or BSN program after graduating, you'll either have to pay for it or rely on private student loans.
  11. by   jojo97
    Omg , thanks for letting me know
  12. by   CenterCourtRN
    Quote from Miiki
    Just to point out...

    Once you complete a bachelor's degree, you won't be eligible for federal student aid for any additional undergraduate coursework. If you plan on attending an ASN or BSN program after graduating, you'll either have to pay for it or rely on private student loans.
    That's not true. You can still take out federal loans, but will not qualify for grants. I know because I did a second bachelors.
  13. by   misspy
    Well i used to be in the same kind of predicament. I feel since your done with most the classes required as a student and for the pre-nurse i think you could just apply for another associates. I moved on to get a bachelors then go back to get the associates so it won't hold me back, it honestly didnt make a different just more money i gotta pay...
  14. by   Nursing347
    Hi I had a similar situation! I was 1 year away from graduating with a biology degree. I only had 45 credits to go but I decided to make the switch to Nursing. I did this because I did not want to waste my time or money finishing bio! I knew I wanted to switch so I applied and switched you are not stuck just because you are 60 credits in you can switch no matter how far you are in. You can look up accelerated post bachelor's degree bsn programs if you want to finish your bio but I doubt having a bio degree will help you get a job in nursing

close