Are there any Second Degree BSN programs that AREN'T accelerated?

  1. 0 I know that in those accelerated programs, they squeeze in 2 years worth of nursing education into 1 year. Then you take the NCLEX-RN.

    I sorta don't want to do an accelerated program, though. How would I get enough clinical experience? Plus, don't the traditional BSN students (i.e., the 19 to 20-year olds) get a lot more reinforcement on the clinical concepts and the critical thinking bit of nursing, because they get more time for it to all sink in?

    I'd actually want to go to a nursing program that taught nursing, rather than come off as an NCLEX test-prep factory that churns out new grads that are less prepared for actual practice.

    Ideally, I'd like some 2nd degree BSN program that's about a year and a half long, rather than the compressed 11-month programs. Are any available?
  2. Visit  Naturally Brilliant profile page

    About Naturally Brilliant

    Joined Jan '13; Posts: 56; Likes: 19.

    14 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  Sweet charm profile page
    0
    Yes, there are lots but most of them are impacted. Google some colleges in your area and look for traditional BSN programs.
  4. Visit  UVA Grad Nursing profile page
    0
    Accelerated BSN programs come in a variety of shape, sizes, and duration. In my state, they range from 11-18 months. The more 'traditional' BSN programs are 2 academic years (fall, spring, fall, spring) and some schools in my state will accept second degree students into this two academic year program.

    Search around the programs in your state. You may also want to look at some of the state programs in other states too. The out-of-state tuition you would pay could still be less than 50% of the price of many of the private schools.
  5. Visit  queserasera profile page
    0
    University of Maryland has a 23 month clinical nurse leader degree.

    Salisbury has a 2 year program.

    You're right though most are conduced or accelerated.
  6. Visit  HammockBound profile page
    0
    Just the traditional programs. It really works out a slight bit longer then the accelerated as you have all the base courses. The accelerated program for me would be 3 semesters or the traditional is about 5 or 6. Not that much difference.
  7. Visit  ryanalice profile page
    0
    Yes you can apply for the traditional BSN program at many schools. They should accept a lot of the core curriculum stuff you did with your first degree, so it won't take you the full 4 years but it will take more time than the accel programs. Average is 2-3 years.
  8. Visit  PennyS profile page
    0
    Quote from Naturally Brilliant
    I know that in those accelerated programs, they squeeze in 2 years worth of nursing education into 1 year. Then you take the NCLEX-RN.

    I sorta don't want to do an accelerated program, though. How would I get enough clinical experience? Plus, don't the traditional BSN students (i.e., the 19 to 20-year olds) get a lot more reinforcement on the clinical concepts and the critical thinking bit of nursing, because they get more time for it to all sink in?

    I'd actually want to go to a nursing program that taught nursing, rather than come off as an NCLEX test-prep factory that churns out new grads that are less prepared for actual practice.

    Ideally, I'd like some 2nd degree BSN program that's about a year and a half long, rather than the compressed 11-month programs. Are any available?
    I am not sure if where you are from and if you are amenable to relocating. Simmons College in Boston has an 18 month and 2 & 3 year options. The other Accel programs in the area has varying time frames -i.e MGH (14 mths), Curry (16mths), UMass Boston (15 mths)
  9. Visit  PurplejadeRN profile page
    0
    The accelerated program I completed had almost the identical amount of clinical days and all the same clinical courses. We ended up having 8 less days total of clinical (4 in psych, 2 I'm community, and 2 in leadership)
  10. Visit  littlerayofsunshine profile page
    0
    Mine is 17 months. We have same classes as traditional students but go through summer to finish faster.
  11. Visit  Naturally Brilliant profile page
    0
    Oh okay! I wonder if I can directly apply for admissions into a Traditional BSN program. I wouldn't want to retake the SAT (which I took a decade ago​) and go through undergrad admissions again...ugh.
  12. Visit  Naturally Brilliant profile page
    0
    Quote from PennyS
    I am not sure if where you are from and if you are amenable to relocating. Simmons College in Boston has an 18 month and 2 & 3 year options. The other Accel programs in the area has varying time frames -i.e MGH (14 mths), Curry (16mths), UMass Boston (15 mths)
    Very interesting. Thank you for this info. Ideally, I'd like to stay in my region of Texas (won't disclose that on this board, as it may give away my real-life identity). This isn't just because of in-state tuition purposes, but also because I'd like to keep my clinical assistant position and go PRN in nursing school. The reasons for it are twofold: #1, as a continued employee, I'd get their tuition reimbursement, and #2, their employees are FAR likelier to get into the Versant program and get hired once they're RNs.

    The prospect of having a virtually guaranteed hospital job upon graduation is too tempting to give up to relocate out to another state.
  13. Visit  iPink profile page
    0
    I'm a graduate of an Accelerated BSN and your clinical hours and experience aren't less than the traditional route. However, if I could do it all again would I go through it? No, it was rough. All that matters now is I did make it. Like UV Grad stated, ABSN programs can go from 12-18 months. My school was 15 months long, but they do have a part-time version too. With the ASN programs, more focus is on the clinical experience.

    Good luck.
  14. Visit  xsmashBSN_RN profile page
    0
    Since you already have a degree, you won't have to retake the SATs or even show them your scores.

    Unfortunately though, since it would be a second Bachelor's degree, you are still considered an undergraduate. Some institutions, however, would consider you an "Adult Undergrad Learner" because of number of credits completed.


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