I *do* recognize the need for nursing theory - page 17

but I am a bit appalled by the theory and research classes requird for my NP program while we covered the entire cardiovascular system in 1.2 hours of Patho. Why is that ?????????????????? We have... Read More

  1. by   llg
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    I hope you feel better. I think you are correct. I would be happy to engage in theory if theory was something I could sink my teeth into. In its current form, it isn't.

    I wish that weren't the case. I want to see my profession be all it can be.

    Just like you.

    Take care.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Thank you. I hope all is well with you and your family.

    llg
  2. by   ntaffe
    Although theory is not my favorite subject, I realize its importance. Nurses, no matter their specialty, must integrate theoretical thinking in the course of their studies and in practice. This is important because it provides a direction to whatever situation (research, clinical practice, or teaching) the nurse finds herself/himself in. I believe it is important for us as nurses to be aware of our history, the current practice, and where we are heading as a profession. For us to continue to progress in our profession, we must show evidence as to the validity of the care we provide to our patients. According to Afaf Ibrahim Meleis, "Theory has become an integral part of the nursing lexicon in education, administration, and practice. Members of the nursing discipline should understand its role in the development of nursing and in the delivery of quality evidence-based nursing care." (p. 4)
  3. by   r0b0tafflicti0n
    Quote from gauge14iv
    It isn't stuff that is readily understandable, embraceable or even useful in many way - and the time and energy we waste on it is just astounding.
    I haven't studied a lot of theory that I've found worthwhile (yet); but are you *really* stating that because something isn't readily understandable that it's a waste of time?

    Perhaps nursing theory needs to be modernized/radicalized, not dismissed/molded into allopatic medicine.
  4. by   Kelly_the_Great
    Quote from ntaffe
    Although theory is not my favorite subject, I realize its importance. Nurses, no matter their specialty, must integrate theoretical thinking in the course of their studies and in practice. This is important because it provides a direction to whatever situation (research, clinical practice, or teaching) the nurse finds herself/himself in. I believe it is important for us as nurses to be aware of our history, the current practice, and where we are heading as a profession. For us to continue to progress in our profession, we must show evidence as to the validity of the care we provide to our patients. According to Afaf Ibrahim Meleis, "Theory has become an integral part of the nursing lexicon in education, administration, and practice. Members of the nursing discipline should understand its role in the development of nursing and in the delivery of quality evidence-based nursing care." (p. 4)
    Your post reminds me of that bar scene in Good Will Hunting when the college student is spouting off his beliefs on the evolution of market economies in the southern colonies...lol I mean we could all quote some passage from one of our books that included nursing theory or was solely dedicated towards its study.

    What I continue to wonder is, should it take precedence over practice? How much weight should be granted in our instruction towards it? Are we putting too much emphasis on it, to the point of excluding "scientific" knowledge?

    Look at your sentences here:
    Quote from ntaffe
    I believe it is important for us as nurses to be aware of our history, the current practice, and where we are heading as a profession. For us to continue to progress in our profession, we must show evidence as to the validity of the care we provide to our patients.
    Are the theories helping our profession progress? Are they bringing us any unity? Are they helping us define nursing so we can control it, teach it, advance it and BILL for it? Or are they splintering us? Do they cause befuddlement amongst the students, at which point they just disengage from even considering advancing the profession, opting instead to just jump through the hoops and then become strictly task-oriented nurses? Do the students who do kind of buy into the indoctrination (upon whichever theory their particular program/instructor happens to espouse) then become overwhelmingly disillusioned when they enter the real world and discover that not only do the majority of their colleagues not know anything at all about theory but could care less? Furthermore, how many of these theories are demonstrably valid? How many of them can you measure with any validity whatsoever? Are they grounded in any "evidence" whatsoever?

    I propose its study does nothing at all to advance an autonomous profession and is a colossal waste of time! What other "profession" besides theology spends sooooooooooo much time studying its "theories" . Gosh, at least religions can pick one and set forth a doctrine stating who they are and what they stand for.
  5. by   JaimeeG
    Kelly -

    Excellent post with very valid comments! I am currently in the first semester of a DNP program, and I am seriously considering dropping out and finding another truly clinical path. This is my fourth theory class, and I am learning nothing new, other than how much I loathe nursing theory.

    As others have stated, we are one of a very few professions who has chosen to become mired down in theory. I NEVER use nursing theory in my daily practice as an NP, much to the dismay of my current theory professor. When I am with a patient and have a problem to solve, I have never scratched my head and thought to myself, "Hmmm...what would Orem/Rogers/Roy/Watson/(insert theorist of your choice) do in this situation?"

    Although the powers-that-be in nursing academia would like to convince us otherwise, we CAN be a legitimate and respected profession without years of nursing theory crammed down our throats. We CAN provide good patient care without years of nursing theory classes. Nursing theory, in my opinion, has done nothing to advance our profession; instead, I feel that it has been a serious detriment. I know of many nurses who stopped their education at the Associate's or Bachelor's level because they so dreaded the thought of more theory. Very sad....

    In the early postings of this thread, someone commented that in their NP program they had a few hours of cardiology instruction but an entire semester on theory. That was something I questioned when I looked at the curriculum of my NP program as well. We had ONE class in adult health in which we went over cardio AND respiratory. Our neuro talk consisted of a neuro NP (who does only sleep medicine) came in and talked about MS and migraines. But, I did have an entire semester of theory and research. Yes, we must make sure we have the classes important to patient care!

    I believe my rant is over for now. I have built-up issues because I am trying to do discussion posts in my class without saying the things I have said above!!!

    Jaimee
  6. by   thbos
    Hi All,
    I’m not a nurse, or even in the clinical health care field, but I stumbled upon the concept of nursing theories and out of curiosity to learn more read this thread. Thanks to all those who have been contributing your thoughts, I feel like I’ve learned a great deal regarding the relevance of nursing theory. I hope you don’t mind, but I’d like to present my opinion as someone outside of the nursing field. After all, the main topic of this post, how to best train students, is fundamental to every field.
    The first thing I noticed in the back and forth of these posts is a lack of opinion by those without a conflict of interest. Many posters on this thread seem to have no appreciation of the importance of bias and conflict of interest. A nurse who has studied nursing theory, taught it, or applied it to their work, has an inherent bias regarding it. A student taking a nursing class and having trouble with the material is also in a conflict of interest when judging it. Certainly those who’s careers are based on it have a conflict of interest when attempting to judge its value.
    My point is, nursing theory needs an external audit by unbiased non-nurses. It is purely self-serving to believe that the only people capable of truly understanding and judging the value of nursing theories are the ones that study and teach it. For instance, a child can be taught the importance of calculus without having to actually understand the language of math. An educated adult can figure out the importance (or lack thereof) of nursing theory without devoting their lives to it first.
    So let’s imagine a group of educated professionals tasked with making recommendations for future nursing curriculums (for the sake of argument lets assemble a small panel of scientist, lawyers, and other community leaders). The Panel would spend a few months interviewing nursing professors, students, and working nurses along with their medical colleagues and patients. Do you think that the panel, after studying current curricula, desired curricula, and professional duties, would recommend more or less nursing theory be taught? My guess is that nursing theory for the most part would be removed from the curriculum and replaced with classes focused on practical skills.
    PS- I did notice that one person attempted to support their side of the argument by arguing that Florence Nightingale would agree with them? Conjuring up the current opinions of the long-time deceased is a very strange way to support any argument. I think it should always be avoided. Who knows what the dead are thinking?
  7. by   Mission
    Quote from thbos
    My point is, nursing theory needs an external audit by unbiased non-nurses.
    Future of nursing report: http://www.iom.edu/Reports/2010/The-...ng-Health.aspx


    Quote from thbos
    Do you think that the panel, after studying current curricula, desired curricula, and professional duties, would recommend more or less nursing theory be taught? My guess is that nursing theory for the most part would be removed from the curriculum and replaced with classes focused on practical skills.
    I think your guess is probably wrong. Nursing is a science (and an art) and you can't teach science with theory. I think, like many other health sciences, the push is towards teaching interdisciplinary theories and methods. At least that is what my school had done.
    Last edit by Mission on Mar 30, '11 : Reason: bad tags
  8. by   Mission
    Quote from Mission
    I think your guess is probably wrong. Nursing is a science (and an art) and you can't teach science with theory. I think, like many other health sciences, the push is towards teaching interdisciplinary theories and methods. At least that is what my school had done.
    That should say you can't teach without theory.

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