So you think flu vaccinations donít work . . . . - page 2

by Laidback Al 4,165 Views | 39 Comments

Ask the parents of the dozens of children who died from flu this year if they are sorry they didnít get their child vaccinated.... Read More


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    Nurses believe sincerely they are professionals. So why to discuss article written on a level of 6th grader which lacks important facts such as preexisting conditions of those who dies of flu. By the way, I noticed every time when really professional articles about medication or diseases are published here. nurses are not interested to discuss it. It looks like that nurses are not professionals, they are just pill pushers, doctors' aide, who believe as if they are professionals.
    chwcbesteph likes this.
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    Steve, clearly you have not read many threads on here. Many of them are addressed professionally, if the context is professional. This thread came off as an attack.
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    again, the vaccine may have served a purpose, maybe not. THERE is no way of knowing if these, very few, children, had underlying health/genetic issues that would have made the vaccine either inappropriate or ineffective. your implying that theses parents all willfully allowed/caused their children to die is insulting.
    Quote from BostonFNP
    The parents, the providers, the government. It really doesn't matter, the ethical concern that providers are faced with remains. A decision needs to be made in proxy.

    I would like to think/hope most parents do want what is best for their kid. Whether all parents actually know and/or do what is best for them is ultimately the concern. Unfortunately, that line of thinking led to 90+ children dying from a virus that could have been (partially) prevented, in this case.

    The waters are further muddied by the principles if herd immunity.
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    The presence of pre-existing conditions that put someone at higher risk from the flu does not make the vaccine less important, in fact it's far more important that those individuals (and everyone else) get vaccinated. What's the argument with idea that many of the kids might have had another condition that put them at higher risk?
    elkpark likes this.
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    Quote from MunoRN
    I would agree that parents have the right to make informed decisions regarding their child's health. "Informed" being the key word. I'm not sure that every decision a parent makes to refuse vaccines could be described as "informed", which makes many of them a bit reckless and therefore deserving of criticism.
    Holy judgment, Batman.
    chwcbesteph and uRNmyway like this.
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    Quote from BostonFNP
    The parents, the providers, the government. It really doesn't matter, the ethical concern that providers are faced with remains. A decision needs to be made in proxy.

    I would like to think/hope most parents do want what is best for their kid. Whether all parents actually know and/or do what is best for them is ultimately the concern. Unfortunately, that line of thinking led to 90+ children dying from a virus that could have been (partially) prevented, in this case.

    The waters are further muddied by the principles if herd immunity.
    This line of thought always cracks me up....."I would like to think/hope most parents do want what is best for their kid" which basically means "I hope parents do what is best for their child" which is only what I think is best for your child.

    Don't forget that every decade or so we look back at what parents used to do for their kids and think "what the heck were they thinking?" And people in the future will look back at how we raised our kids and think the same thing. Parents aren't perfect, we do the best we can and that's all that we can hope for.
    uRNmyway likes this.
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    Quote from Pets to People
    This line of thought always cracks me up....."I would like to think/hope most parents do want what is best for their kid" which basically means "I hope parents do what is best for their child" which is only what I think is best for your child.
    I am glad it made you laugh.

    It's not unusual that my impression and plan differs from what the patient or patient's proxy wants. I see at least 5 people a day that want either opioids or antibiotics and don't get them. Why? Because I know it's not best for them, despite what they "want". I have the education and experience to make that judgement.

    Yet when it comes to vaccines, parents/patients so clearly know better. Parents/patients are free to make their own choice, but it doesn't mean I agree with it.
    Last edit by BostonFNP on Mar 30, '13
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    I've had the flu twice in my life, both times after I had the flu vaccine. Each time, I was deathly ill. I've never had it (the flu or the vaccine) in any other year. It's tough to know what to believe.
    chwcbesteph and uRNmyway like this.
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    Quote from SuzieVN
    I've had the flu twice in my life, both times after I had the flu vaccine. Each time, I was deathly ill. I've never had it (the flu or the vaccine) in any other year. It's tough to know what to believe.
    In my youth, I never wore a seat belt, and was never in a car accident. After seat belts were mandated, I was in accident wearing my seat belt. Did the seat belt cause my accident? It's tough to know what to believe.
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    Quote from Steve123
    Do you know about serious complication of flu shot? 1 out of 100,000 vaccinated develops GB. There are 55 millions of school age children in US. If you vaccinate all of them you will have 50 + paralyzed children as a result of GB. Plus some of the vaccinated still die of flu. What is the benefit? And do not forget to add preschoolers to those 55 millions... So my conclusion is: risk outweighs benefits. But it is money for Big Pharma.
    Less than 1 in 1 million recipients of the flu vaccine experience the side effect GBS; your statistic is extremely inaccurate.


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