When circ's go bad... - page 14

Has anyone seen a circ go really bad? I saw one today where the doc took too much foreskin off and the skin on the shaft ended up "degloving" from the fascia underneath. A urologist had to come in... Read More

  1. by   MickyB-RN
    I don't believe in routine circumcision. When my 15 y/o was born people thought I was crazy not to get him circumcized. The pediatrician assured my husband that less than 1% of males ever have a problem with not being circumsized. I had done my homework and really had to present my husband with alot of information before he would agree to no circumcision and when the pediatrician added his two cents he was finally convinced.

    When our son was 3 years old he developed phimosis. He had to be circumcized and it was very traumatic for him, he couldn't wear pants for over 3 weeks, and ran around in a large t-shirt all day. If I were to have another son (not happening I'm 49) but I would have him circumcized. >>

    Same here. My youngest is currently healing from a circumcision performed on September 30th. He is 6 years old and this whole thing was way too traumatic for him. It's been absolutely awful for him.


    Kelly
  2. by   futureTMA
    Does anyone know/have experience with the incidence of infection in elderly men being uncirc? Does it lead to being circ at their age? Wouldn't staff have to clean this area?
  3. by   jdmatt
    Quote from TweetiePieRN
    When people make the arguement that it is not fair to circumcise a baby because they cannot give consent....what about parents who elect to have a child's ears surgically pinned back??? Isn't that not fair as well?
    or parents who have their infant's ears pierced.
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Ear piercing hardly can lead to permanent disability and/or disfiguration as a botched or improperly-performed elective circumcision can. I think we are talking apples and oranges when comparing ear-piercing to circumcision here.
  5. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Ear piercing hardly can lead to permanent disability and/or disfiguration as a botched or improperly-performed elective circumcision can. I think we are talking apples and oranges when comparing ear-piercing to circumcision here.
    True . . . but still, what IS the point of piercing a baby's ears?

    It was such a cool moment for my daughter to get her ears pierced when she was a pre-teen . . . . why take away a kid's big moments just so a parent can decorate their kid?

    Just a little pet peeve of mine . ..

    steph
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    we can argue:

    what is the point of circumcizing a healthy child?

    It truly comes down to personal preference (if not religious rites) in the end.
  7. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    we can argue:

    what is the point of circumcizing a healthy child?

    It truly comes down to personal preference (if not religious rites) in the end.
    I agree again. It is just that I'm getting tired of helping.

    steph
  8. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Gladly I don't have to . Most of our peds refuse to circ til the babies have gone home and are indeed healthy and eating well, first.
  9. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Gladly I don't have to . Most of our peds refuse to circ til the babies have gone home and are indeed healthy and eating well, first.
    Ours are usually circ'd an hour before discharge . . . . . At least most of the docs use lidocaine.

    steph
  10. by   fergus51
    Quote from stevielynn
    Ours are usually circ'd an hour before discharge . . . . . At least most of the docs use lidocaine.

    steph
    My last hospital stopped that practice because they preferred to have the baby in house if anything did go wrong later (bleeding into a diaper for an hour or two at home is a scary thing).
  11. by   MarySunshine
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    That's why if i had boy babies, i'd have it done. I wouldn't want them to go through that as an adult.
    I've heard this reasoning a lot and I don't really understand it. I would rather an adult who can reason through an experience go through something painful, than an infant in his first days of life, still learning about the world and trust. Even though the procedure IS more painful, with longer recovery time, and of course, the vivid memory present for an adult, I would still choose that over an infant experiencing it. I know men don't remember the experience as infants, but I just worry about trust/mistrust, subconscious trauma and all that. Especially when the odds are in my favor that phimosis will never happen at all.
  12. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from MarySunshine
    I've heard this reasoning a lot and I don't really understand it. I would rather an adult who can reason through an experience go through something painful, than an infant in his first days of life, still learning about the world and trust. Even though the procedure IS more painful, with longer recovery time, and of course, the vivid memory present for an adult, I would still choose that over an infant experiencing it. I know men don't remember the experience as infants, but I just worry about trust/mistrust, subconscious trauma and all that. Especially when the odds are in my favor that phimosis will never happen at all.
    Then let me explain it then. As many adult and adolescent circumcisions i've seen, and how painful and sore it looks (not to mention the condition that caused them to need this done), i would rather that they be spared of that as an adolescent or an adult. My opinion was "no, no, no" until i saw the surgeries.
  13. by   mstigerlily
    One of the many reasons I work nights is because I don't have to do circumcisions. I don't like watching them and I think the insistance on them is baffling. I've had one mother whose baby was jaundiced, going under double bank, dehydrated and running a fever and the first thing she asked me EVERY time I came into the room was, "When does he get his circumcision?" One pt had a 32 weeker in the NICU and every day she asked about his circumcision.

    My husband's family is of an ethnic group that doesn't circumcise and their family is just fine with that extra skin (so is my son). However, I don't make a big deal out of it at work, I've never said a single word against it to a patient. If I am required to assist with one I will - I just don't like it.

    Melissa

    Quote from palesarah
    I also don't believe that routine infant circumcision is necessary, and don't participate in them. Since I work nights it's pretty rare that I would be asked to do so- but we have one awesome ped who comes in at 5:40 am, and I usually see him once a week or so on one of my shifts. My coworkers are aware that in addition to having ethical issues about participating in circs, observing the procedure is about the only thing guaranteed to make me pass out , so someone else is always willing to assist if our LNA or nursery nurse is unavailable.
    Sorry for the tangent- to the op- I've only been in LDRP since May '04, and I'd estimate 90% of the baby boys born with us are circ'd before discharge, There's one ped who doesn't believe they are necessary and does kind of a half-circ, leaving some of the foreskin. So besides those (which I'm sure those baby boys will be glad to have those extra nerve endings in the leftove tissue when they grow up!), I've only seen a couple mild bleeders and one in which far too much skin was removed.

    I have also seen what happens to those babies who had far too much tissue removed and required fancy putting of things together when they become an adult, and he has a scar along the underside of the shaft that he & his mother don't remember him getting, bits of hair growning on either side of the scar, and decreased sensation on one side of that scar.
    He has never been able to reach organism through intercourse.

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