What's The Weirdest Name You've Heard A Patient Name Her Baby? - page 112

Hi, I was wondering about some of those weird names that you've probably encountered in L&D and PP. I remember when I had my maternity rotation a couple of weeks ago, one of the nurses said she... Read More

  1. by   Jamesdotter
    Quote from ARNurse2B
    Oh yeah, and a Shirley Allison....first and last name...oh and he was male!
    I dated a guy in college named Vivian Carroll (he went by his initials) and once had an uncle named Bernice.
  2. by   ElvishDNP
    My mother has a female friend named Vernon.

    Once a lady walked into the L/D unit where my friend worked. My friend asks her if she's got a name picked out for her baby...the girl (she was about 17) says, "Oh yes, I've got a nice Bible name for him." "Really?"
    "Thashel. Thashel Nakeel." Friends scrolls through all the Bible names she knows & draws a blank. "What part of the Bible is that name from?"

    "From the Ten Commandments. Thashel Nakeel, Thashel Nasteel..."

    I am not making this up. Whether my friend is or not I don't know, but she's not one to make things up.
  3. by   eden
    Vivian, Shirley were traditionally male names as is Alexis and Yves. As far as Lemonjello and Orangejello and co follow the link to snopes urban legands. http://www.snopes.com/racial/language/names.htm and sroll down for a list.
  4. by   Doc to be
    Quote from trepinCT
    Are you from Connecticut?.I posted those names here and no one believed me..they thought it was an urban legend.....I live in Ct. and I know of these two from the maternity unit I worked..years later a friend confirmed this when she worked for the board of health and the kids signed up for school
    No (kinda worries me that someone ELSE named their kids that!). Those two were before my time, actually; from when my momma was in El Paso, i think. I'll ask her later. Onto another note, not really wierd, but different: Journey (she is a CUTE one)

    EDIT: Oh, just remembered: Chlamydia (i **** you not; she saw it on a poster on a wall and thought it was a pretty name)
    Last edit by Doc to be on Apr 26, '07
  5. by   Becca608
    I've been all through this link and what I see are anecdotes and unusual names that are beautiful in reflecting what the parents are thinking and committed to.

    Being from the South, I could come up with extremely WEIRD names (ZyKedra) that sound more like trade names for drugs. These are purportably supposed to be of African origen, but I don't see educated AAF parents providing thier children with these names.

    Any clue? I'm 200 miles east of Gullah country and no AAF that I have talked to even know about the Gullah.

    Just curious....
  6. by   GoldenLove
    OMG...I have been in strictly Peds for 8 years..I could keep you entertained for hours I still giggle at twins..Sparkle and Spartacus though!! I can't even pronounce or spell lots of ones I have seen. And how dare me mispronounce it when they come in! PFFT!! If they didn't have 21 letters...dang.
  7. by   ElvishDNP
    Sparkle and Spartacus. What in the world!
  8. by   trepinCT
    Quote from eden
    Vivian, Shirley were traditionally male names as is Alexis and Yves. As far as Lemonjello and Orangejello and co follow the link to snopes urban legands. http://www.snopes.com/racial/language/names.htm and sroll down for a list.
    Say what you want..I know it for sure to be true..I worked at the hospital they were born at....doesn't matter to me if anyone believes it..been thru this before on earlier post..its a fact..verified by a health dept. employee and a nurse who works for an insurance company...would serve me no purpose to lie about it.Snopes.com does not disprove this.
    Last edit by trepinCT on Apr 27, '07
  9. by   FinNurse
    Anu Saukko.
    In english this doesen`t mean anything, but in my language, when u put the first and surname together= anusaukko
    in english=anal hole
  10. by   ElvishDNP
    Quote from FinNurse
    Anu Saukko.
    In english this doesen`t mean anything, but in my language, when u put the first and surname together= anusaukko
    in english=anal hole
    That is too funny! I have a dear Finnish friend who would find that quite funny as well. Kiitos!
  11. by   FinNurse
    Ole hyv
  12. by   KellNY
    WAY OT, but....
    Quote from JediWitch
    ...ZyKedra ....These are purportably supposed to be of African origen, but I don't see educated AAF parents providing thier children with these names.
    As a white person (keeping that in mind), but also as the mother of a non-white son with a black name (keep that in there too), I'd like to explain this briefly if I could. I think that many of the "african" names are not african at all, but African-American names--American being the opperative word. They do not have any origins in Africa.

    That is to say that while a name such as LaTisha would be unheard of among any African tribe or country, it is not uncommon in the AA community.

    The reasoning for this-from what I understand-is that the history of slavery is one that in many ways still runs deep in this country. When Africans were brought to America, they were literally stripped of their culture--their language, their religion, their traditions, and yes, their names. So "inventing" your own name specific to your own culture in order to claim your identity seems an appropriate response, as does choosing traditional African names in order to reclaim what was lost.

    So you were not wrong to note a distinct difference.

    Some baby books now actually have Black names and origin is listed as "African American" or simply "American".
  13. by   cc_nurse
    The first one to come to mind is "Prince Michael"...:uhoh21:

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