baby friendly questions baby friendly questions - pg.9 | allnurses

baby friendly questions - page 11

The hospital that I work at is in the process of becoming baby friendly, and I have some questions about how the baby friendly initiative is implemented in other hospitals. I want to start by... Read More

  1. Visit  itsnowornever profile page
    0
    We are a "baby friendly" hospital...and I had a nurse tell me "it hasn't been an hour yet, take the baby back!" Well mom was tired, her delivery was HARD and this wasn't the first baby. I was yelled at because the nurse was angry mom wouldn't breast feed yet and didn't want skin to skin and at one point said "I don't care what mom wants, unless she wants to be a bad mom, but I guess that's what she wants" really?!?!?! I was ashamed for the nurse!
  2. Visit  SL2014 profile page
    3
    I agree that a woman using the nursery or choosing not to breast feed is entirely their choice.

    But I have come across many women who chose to bottle feed and most of them say "there is no difference between breast milk or formula, it doesn't matter".

    Yes... it does matter. It is our job as healthcare professionals to do the best that we possibly can to educate patients and sometimes you have to repeat things and use more direct wording for someone to get the point. Having someone read something about the benefits of breast feeding is a lot different than having them sign something saying "I understand that by not breast feeding, I am allowing my child to be more at risk for upper respratory infections, asthma, cancer, heart disease...".

    It may seem like you are "inducing guilt", you are not. The facts are the facts. If a mother chooses not to breast feed they must be completely aware of the effect of the decision that they are making. If she still says "No." then great, move on and help her find the best formula.

    I just think that people are not educated enough and sometimes are babied, not allowing them to understand the seriousness of their decisions.
    Marymoomoo, duckydot28, and LibraSunCNM like this.
  3. Visit  sandseaandstone profile page
    1
    We are going through getting baby friendly certification. The skin to skin initiative in my opinion is such a good thing---mom gets baby right away and she gets to see him/her the first hour before anyone else. Sometimes moms do great with sections and sometimes not...sometimes they do great delivering vaginally...sometimes not. Sometimes there is a significant other, and sometimes not. I feel like it's my job as a nurse to protect the mom and the baby. If mom is viciously puking and having nausea with terrible pain and no support person---yup, I'll help her with the baby. I'll hold the baby and feed him/her if requested AND take it to the nursery. I've had moms drop off their babies at the nursery to walk the unit....and we take them. I have seen a baby get a bottle feeding and go on to breastfeed without trouble---supporting a mom in the way that she needs us to doesn't mean she won't know what to do when she gets home and won't "get a break". It's our job to provide support the first few days, to help them on their feet. There was a baby dropped on the unit late last year...and I just recently was doing hourly rounds and found a mom sleeping with the baby---I had to gently wake up mom, take baby and offer to take baby to nursery bc she obviously needed rest (csection). If I get fired for that, fine. If I ever have to explain why I was fired, fine. I will say that once a mom says she wants to bottle feed, we let her bottle feed. An initial exchange is usually had about benefits of bfing, but then it is left alone as her choice and we SUPPORT her. We do not give out pacis, but if they bring them we do not harp on that decision as they ARE the parents.
    duckydot28 likes this.
  4. Visit  duckydot28 profile page
    2
    The baby isn't the only one who needs care. Momma does too.

    And all that stuff about how babies shouldn't be separated from their mothers during the first few days is overblown. We went over this in psych...mothers used to be told that if they didn't immediately hold their babies within minutes after birth, they could not properly bond throughout their lifetime. When babies had to go the NICU, often their mothers assumed that their relationships would be tainted forever...and proceed to act that way toward their children. Later research revealed that parent-child bonding has almost nothing to do with being able to hold your baby immediately, but rather more on being a dedicated parent throughout the lifetime of the baby. And you can be a dedicated parent, and still take breaks to take care of yourself. Tsk tsk tsk.
    Elvish and Twinmom06 like this.
  5. Visit  Marymoomoo profile page
    1
    Quote from duckydot28
    The baby isn't the only one who needs care. Momma does too.

    And all that stuff about how babies shouldn't be separated from their mothers during the first few days is overblown. We went over this in psych...mothers used to be told that if they didn't immediately hold their babies within minutes after birth, they could not properly bond throughout their lifetime. When babies had to go the NICU, often their mothers assumed that their relationships would be tainted forever...and proceed to act that way toward their children. Later research revealed that parent-child bonding has almost nothing to do with being able to hold your baby immediately, but rather more on being a dedicated parent throughout the lifetime of the baby. And you can be a dedicated parent, and still take breaks to take care of yourself. Tsk tsk tsk.
    Are you aware that skin to skin isn't just for the mother, it's for the baby first and foremost? Skin to skin contact is an important part of an infants' early development. It makes a difference not just in the first few days, but in years to come! The positive outcomes are most pronounced in premature infants, but all babies need contact with their mothers (or a loving caregiver if mom is not able or available). Here's a report on a recent study you might be interested in.
    Loving touch critical for premature infants
    SoldierNurse22 likes this.
  6. Visit  klone profile page
    0
    Breastfeeding success is greatly enhanced by immediate skin to skin and not separating the mom and baby postpartum. NOBODY is saying that if mom and baby are separated, it will create a lifelong inability to bond properly.

    My own personal experience - my first two children, I had immediate skin to skin and rooming in 24/7. I had an abundant milk supply (was able to donate milk) and breastfed them until they were 4. With my third child, he had to go to the NICU. I didn't get to hold him until he was 6 days old. We struggled through primary lactation failure, I had to supplement 1/2 his milk until he was taking in enough solids, and he weaned at 19 months. Coincidence? Who knows.
  7. Visit  2010R profile page
    1
    Our hospital just started our Baby-Friendly journey, and it's been a nightmare. Pretty much all hospitals in our area are going for BF. Duckydot28, you hit the nail on the head! These BFHI steps are being treated like "the gospel" of successful breastfeeding, which it is not! Moms and babies absolutely still bond when the baby is sent to the nursery. And it's very upsetting to me that we are supposed to pretend that these moms won't bond with their infants because of a few hours in the nursery. It's absolutely ridiculous. If a mom isn't bonding with her infant, there are deeper problems that rooming in is not going to fix.

    Breastfeeding is absolutely best. And most moms are well aware if this and have decided how they're going to feed their infant before they even enter the hospital. Breastfeeding is being treated like it's going to prevent all illnesses and diseases, and formula is being treated like poison. Formula is poison unless your baby needs it...is a NICU baby, looses too much weight, becomes dehydrated, etc. Then all of a sudden becomes lifesaving and it's ok.

    I hope in a few years that we will take a look at if this BFHI is actually increasing breastfeeding rates. I don't think it will. I think all it's managing to do is make new moms feel like they're being judged. It also prevents RNs from being able to help moms they way they want to be helped. A patient tells you what they need, formula, a pacifier, a nursery, you should be able to provide that.

    The research that supports BFHI is from the early 90's. The research is just too old. There needs to be new research to support it. And most of it, you can't even draw cause and effect conclusions from it. For example, you can't include that pacifiers decrease breastfeeding rates from the data!

    I recently found a small list of about 6 hospitals, 4 of which were Baby-Friendly, and most of these hospitals still and a 50-60% breastfeeding rate, despite being officially designated Baby-Friendly. I think it was in The Boston Globe. The whole thing is ridiculous. I doubt that BF rates will go up as a result of these steps.

    Our patients certainly don't want most of these steps to be implemented. They like the skin to skin. But, they want the nursery, pacifiers, and some want formula. Nothing wrong with any of that! Doesn't make them bad mothers. They're the patients! They know what they need. We shouldn't be telling them what they need.

    Infant drops have gone up with this too. This is unacceptable! But this is a trend in BF hospitals if you look at the data! The drops go up when exhausted moms are forced to keep their infants when they are unable to safely care for them! How these lactivists think this is acceptable is beyond me! Some of them aren't even nurses, so they of course can't relate to being responsible for these mom's and baby's safety. Breastfeeding is their only job and concern. You can't breastfeed a dead infant though. As a nurse, you're most concerned about safety and meeting your patients' needs. I just can't believe that this BFHI has gotten this far and that hospital administrators are actually buying this crap! None of the nurses or even the nurse managers buy it at our hospital. We're just being forced to do it by upper management because it's "the thing" to do. It's horrible!
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  8. Visit  klone profile page
    3
    Quote from 2010R
    I hope in a few years that we will take a look at if this BFHI is actually increasing breastfeeding rates. I don't think it will.<snip>

    The research that supports BFHI is from the early 90's. The research is just too old.
    BFHI has been around for 25 years. And yes, it has shown that it improves breastfeeding initiation rates, as well as decreases attrition rates at hospital discharge and 3 months.

    No, the research that supports BFHI BEGAN in the early '90s, when BFHI began. But there is continued research over the years, and research as recent as 2015, showing that it improves breastfeeding rates.

    If they are FORCING tired moms to keep their babies in their rooms, without any family support in caring for the infant, then they're not interpreting or implementing BFHI correctly. Blame your facility, not BFHI.

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