? About not breastfeeding - page 4

Hello, I am not looking for a big debate or anything. I just want to know if nurses, in general, look down on moms who choose not to breastfeed. Not because of a medical reason, just because mom... Read More

  1. by   Keepstanding
    Sure Breast feeding is the best way to go, but to imply that your baby will grow up to be the next "Charles Manson" if you do not breast feed him is totally insane. Nurses who lay a guilt trip on their new mothers gives us all a bad name. Everyone must do what they have to do. :kiss
  2. by   Spidey's mom
    Ah Deb - you've got me beat then.

    My true love with nursing would be ER . .. but I'm a rural nurse and we do a bit of everything. I thought in nursing school that I wanted to be an L&D nurse, and I am, but it isn't what I really love to do. Especially the post-partum stuff.

    However, I am a good nurse and do give my best. Just like the women who come in addicted to drugs - I do my best while inside, I'm pretty mad at them.

    This happens in nursing - you get a patient you don't exactly like or a situation you don't like - but you still do your best.

    It just happens to me alot since I nurse in so many different areas.

    We had a very sweet 93 year old lady - feisty and funny - hard to physically care for with a huge GI Bleed and many PRBS's infused. I loved taking care of her. Even though it was hard.

    We don't have a LC at night either but all of us, including the CNA's have taken a breastfeeding class. So, at least we are all telling the same story. When I first started working here, you would not believe the "old wive's stories" being passed onto patients.

    steph
  3. by   nurse4theplanet
    I have never had the urge to work with moms and babies. Procreating doesn't require much more than having a working penis and vagina, unfortunately. Not all people are meant to be parents and it must get frustrating to see these types come through the hospital. It is hard to separate one's personal feelings and emotions when a helpless child is involved. I think the topics of breastfeeding, vag. birth vs c-sec, and epidurals become the battleground many times for much deeper issues. Because I do not work in this area and I do not have children, I can maintain a very neutral position....but I think when you deal with it on a day to day basis, and you have children of your own it can become emotional and tiring for the nurse. I give props to all those who work in L&D and post-partum. You have a very tough job.
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quoting Steph:

    ]Ah Deb - you've got me beat then.

    My true love with nursing would be ER . .. but I'm a rural nurse and we do a bit of everything. I thought in nursing school that I wanted to be an L&D nurse, and I am, but it isn't what I really love to do. Especially the post-partum stuff.

    However, I am a good nurse and do give my best. Just like the women who come in addicted to drugs - I do my best while inside, I'm pretty mad at them.

    This happens in nursing - you get a patient you don't exactly like or a situation you don't like - but you still do your best.

    It just happens to me alot since I nurse in so many different areas.

    We had a very sweet 93 year old lady - feisty and funny - hard to physically care for with a huge GI Bleed and many PRBS's infused. I loved taking care of her. Even though it was hard.

    We don't have a LC at night either but all of us, including the CNA's have taken a breastfeeding class. So, at least we are all telling the same story. When I first started working here, you would not believe the "old wive's stories" being passed onto patients.

    ________________________________________
    Ah Steph you are fast!!!!

    I have to point out: I edited my previous post to say, I have the luxury to be patient as I don't have surgical patients to care for too---except for post-op GYN ones. Our OB/GYN unit is strictly OB/GYN----rarely do we get overflow except for clean uncomplicated post-ops. So nope, I don't have lap choleys and others---just LDRP and GYN. That helps a lot.

    As far as LC specialist help, that is only available on our unit from 8-1 Mon-Fri. I have considered getting my IBCLC if for nothing else, to have the skills our wonderful and patient LC has and help out our "off shifts" more. It's a matter of time and money for me, however----it is not cheap or easy to get an LC, as you imagine--so I have done the next best thing, been to classes and done lots of reading up on the subject. But I have still a lot to learn!

    I am sorry if my post put you down in anyway-----re-reading it, I think it looked pretty bad in that first sentence---(((STEPH))) I did not mean to be rude.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Dec 14, '05
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    One thing you brought up was consistency, Steph. I have to say, that is GREAT. I find often, many places, teaching patients conflicting information is a HUGE problem, including our hospital, at times. I think it's great you all are on the same page. Believe me, that helps these patients so much. Bravo!
  6. by   NurseWilliam
    Quote from fergus51
    In fairness, that does depend on the situation. I work NICU and premies who are fed formula have an increased RISK of NEC compared to babies that are fed breast milk.
    I have heard the same from a host of L&D and LC RNs. But ironically, one of the major risk factors for NEC is early enteral feeding (Wong et al., 2002). In light of that, I wonder if it is possible that the preemie's gut at a certain point simply may not be mature enough to tolerate anything, including mother's milk? I could be wrong on that, and I am open to correction. But again, evidence of the certainly supports the benefits of the practice of providing preemies with mother's milk when and if at all possible.

    And back to the issue of LCRNs: I met some fantastic LCRNs during my OB rotation in school (I didn't shadow them for obvious reasons). They were very good at presenting all the information to moms, including the benefits of formula feeding when breastfeeding simply was not possible. I don't know if there are a certain percentage of militant LCRNs at every hospital, or if certain hospitals draw them. The LCRNs at the hospital where my son was born 15 years ago were all feminist brutes, and I got the "It's all your fault" look from them quite a bit. But 15 years was a long time ago.

    Nurses- saving the world, one life at a time
  7. by   Spidey's mom
    Deb - nope, no worries . . . I completely understand.

    steph
  8. by   sjt9721
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    I have never had the urge to work with moms and babies. Procreating doesn't require much more than having a working penis and vagina, unfortunately. Not all people are meant to be parents and it must get frustrating to see these types come through the hospital...
    ...and to think you have to have a license to fish!
  9. by   sddlnscp
    Personally, I was extremely grateful for a nurse who did not look down on Mom's who didn't breastfeed when I had my first child. We were in the hospital for 3 days because, try as I might, I could not get him to breastfeed and they did not want to release me without him eating (which was quite fine with me, I might add!). I was in tears by the end of the whole thing and finally, a sweet, sympathetic nurse who could see how much we were struggling and how much it was tearing me up told me, "I was a bottle baby, it will be ok if you choose that". Now, don't get me wrong, she wasn't promoting it, she had been helping me to try to breastfeed throughout this whole ordeal - but she knew I was at my wits end and it wasn't good for either me or my little guy. Well, I looked at this beautiful, intelligent woman and thought . . . wow . . . if she was bottle-fed and she turned out like this, then I guess it is ok if I do that for my child. I have never regretted it and, because of her kindness, I will never forget her - she was another one of those "pulls" at my heart for me to go into nursing. Thank goodness for kind and non-judgemental nurses!!!
  10. by   StuNurseUP
    Does anyone know of any research bieng done on why moms would not want to breast feed? personally I have seen alot of people pressured by thier partners that breasts are for sexual purposes only. I have also seen dads get jealous that mom is "bonding faster" than he is. I wonder how you could fix public miseducation (negative attitudes) about such a positive and healthy practice.
  11. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    hahahahahahahahahaha:roll

    that made me laugh so hard i almost peed my pants.

    I have a nursing school buddy that would fit that profile, so maybe I should recommend that she become a lactation consultant.

    seriously, I think breastfeeding is great if you can do it. New mom's need all the education they can get to do it properly and successfully, but if it doesn't work out then it doesnt work out.

    And if you come across a patient that doesn't even want to try.....oh well! It is their baby and they will be making decisions for it for the next 18+ years so don't get all huffy puffy or call them lazy or bad mothers.....passing judgement is not in our job description, offering assistance, education, compassion, and acceptance IS.
    I read alot of your posts and agree once again with another!! You are right on!
  12. by   StuNurseUP
    "Many times the mother is already malnurished and the baby has taken alot from them physically. Breastfeeding tends to rob them further of nutrients, even with supplements"

    In a research collection I have read, Breastfeeding and Human Lactation,
    It states that women have to be severley malnourished (think Sub Saharan Africa) for them not to pass on proper nutrition to thier babies. Your body just uses your vitamin stores.
    I don't want to make moms do something they aren't comfortable with. At the same time I would like too kno why moms in general aren't comfortable with it and what we as asociety can do to fix it.
  13. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from StuNurseUP
    Your patient advocacy skills are lacking and new moms will pick up on that quickly, as one or two have already noted here. It's not your baby, it's not your life, and it's not your breasts being attacked!

    Since when is a baby needing to eat food designed for it an attack on a woman's breasts? sheesh
    Maybe you need to go back and read your original post...it did come off as very abrasive and judgmental IMHO.

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