Sigma Theta Tau ... and then drop it later?

  1. 0
    I'm a BSN student and my school has provided some information on joining Sigma Theta Tau. Naturally, I began researching it on AN. Per older threads, it looks like it might be beneficial when you are first looking for a job because it looks nice on a resume. However, I was just thinking of putting my nursing GPA on my resume (pretty close to 4.0) and that should cover that. I also have a couple of internships to include on my resume so my resume is not completely barren. Would joining Sigma Theta Tau give me an added advantage when it comes time to search for my first job? Or is the $150 induction fee + $100/annual not worth it? At most, I was thinking of a compromise where I join for a year and after I get my first job, I don't renew. Thoughts?

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  2. 10 Comments...

  3. 0
    It will help later on, when you go to grad school or for other work you can't begin to imagine now. Why not call them up and ask them if you can be on inactive status and reactivate at a later date?
  4. 1
    It looks like you automatically go onto inactive status when you don't renew. I am leaning towards joining for now and then see if I want to renew or not later on. I am interested in grad school down the line (maybe 5-7 years from now, although I love bedside nursing); however, I'm not entirely sure what type of APN I would want to be. I think you have a valid point about it being beneficial for other work I can't imagine at this point. Membership HAS to carry some value, right?
    GrnTea likes this.
  5. 0
    It depends on what job you're trying to get. I have never seen STT as an advantage in getting a floor job. That does not make you look better. I wouldn't waste money on it, personally. I didn't join in undergrad and I had no issues getting a job. I don't think any of my co-workers are in STT, either. I don't see what STT membership has done for any of my friends who joined.
  6. 0
    I personally did not get any benefit from STT and dropped after several years. It is focused mostly on academia and I do not work in a university setting
  7. 1
    If you live in CA (or another state) where the competition for GOOD New Grad programs is fierce (several hundred applicants for each opening), the answer is yes, join. Do EVERYTHING possible in school to boost your resume! Join your Student Nursing Association and serve as an officer, join Peer Assistance programs as a facilitator, become a mentor, do extra volunteer services, keep you GPA up and join whatever honor societies you can (this shows that you are not afraid to be a leader and a team player). Once you graduate, get extra certs like ACLS, PALS, NRP, EGC, etc to make you a more desirable candidate (it shows you have initiative to progress your career). Every pre-interview/phone interview I had for New Grad programs asked about my GPA, leadership activities, and extra certs. I live in CA and graduated in August. less than 40% of my classmates have landed jobs in acute care facilities and those that have did the above or were already working as CNA's or UC's at the facilities that hired them.

    Concerning STTI specifically, they are a wonderful networking resource for when you are trying to get that first job, and a great foot in the door if you plan on getting into a MSN or DNP program. Look at it as an investment in your future. You can always let the membership lapse once it is no longer providing you with a benefit.
    Sigma Theta Tau Intl likes this.
  8. 1
    I joined and then went inactive after my first year. My local chapter is pretty inactive otherwise I would have considered staying active now. At some point I'll probably reactivate my membership. The thing about membership on your resume is that it doesn't just show that you have good grades, but that you invest in nursing as a profession by the membership. The other thing to consider is that you might not get another invite later when you are at the career stage where it would be beneficial to you.
    joanna73 likes this.
  9. 0
    Join and then go inactive later on. This is what I did also. After my first year, I didn't renew my membership, but STTI is listed on my resume. If you decide on grad school later on, STTI is a great resource.
  10. 0
    If you almost have a 4.0 you don't need to put your GPA on the resume...aren't you going to graduate with honors? magna cum laude looks good; it's absolutely breathtaking on mine.

    I've said before don't repeat yourself on the cover letter/resume. When you tell which university you grad from that's where it goes. blah blah school, year, honors mention.
  11. 0
    Quote from tyvin
    If you almost have a 4.0 you don't need to put your GPA on the resume...aren't you going to graduate with honors? magna cum laude looks good; it's absolutely breathtaking on mine.

    I've said before don't repeat yourself on the cover letter/resume. When you tell which university you grad from that's where it goes. blah blah school, year, honors mention.
    I put my GPA and graduation honors on my resume. Magna and summa come with a range of GPAs at every school I've been to, and if you've done very well in school I think it's OK to highlight the heck out of it.


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