Teachers' Group Votes Against Helping Children w/Diabetes - page 4

my sister sent this to me and i just wondered if anyone else had heard about this and what they thought of it. she has a 12year old son with diabetes and she has fought with the school system over... Read More

  1. by   Mermaid4
    Interesting. I see that recognition of a change in a child's behavior as extremely important with teaching or any profession connected to children. Using that point, it wouldn't "be exactly fair" to expect a teacher to at least suspect something if a child is acting oddly or differently when sexual, physical or emotional abuse is occurring. I am not suggesting that teachers be diagnosticians, but if a responsible parent informs a teacher what signs hallmark the aura of a seizure or hypo glycemic reaction, or that lethargy combined with a fruity smelling breath at least warrants further action, I expect and laud that teacher for at least trying to get things done and initiated...And to the person who said that as a nurse I should at least omewhat recognize the familiarity of issues affecting people out on the street who may be having symptoms to which I am unfamiliar given my chosen specialty of OB, I do agree for the most part, although I also think that being away from something for numerous years does NOT qualify me to either intervene or diagnose...JUST like your teacher issue...I don't think most seasoned teachers are being credit here and it interests me that they are not being advocated more...But, that is why so many abuse laden children are getting missed in the system. It isn't that teachers don't care. It IS because that is something they either aren't or don't feel they should be made familiar with. A little education goes a long way...I don't expect anyone to cure, diagnose or treat. I just expect them to open their eyes long enough to perhaps save a child....MY child.....Thanks again for your point...I still disagree with the majority of it....But, your point is well taken...NOT sending my children to schools housing teachers with similar thoughts.
  2. by   fab4fan
    I hope I misunderstood you, because nowhere did I see anyone say he/she didn't care about these children. Remember, while you are worrying about your child, there are probably 29 other children with parents who feel that their child's needs are just as pressing. Who is the teacher supposed to worry about first? The child with severe asthma? The child with HIV? The child with a tube feeding?

    What responsibility does the schoolchild have in terms of managing his illness? I used to be a peds nurse, and most of the kids we saw were very savvy about their disease...even the very young ones. It seems to me that a parent who wants his/her child to be mainstreamed would also be just as concerned that the child understood his illness, too. (Obviously, I am not including children who are not mentally competent to do so.)
    Last edit by fab4fan on Sep 10, '04
  3. by   renerian
    I would not want a teacher giving any of my 5 kids a shot. One of my boys had seizures and they would call 911.

    renerian
  4. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    I agree with the teachers' union, and the other posters here. Teachers are there to teach and must not be expected to act as nurses, as well. The schools will just have to suck it up and hire some NURSES.
  5. by   mattsmom81
    Just a few thoughts...IMO, if a diabetic child is so brittle he will likely have a reaction at school, perhaps he should be home schooled OR put in a private school where a school nurse is available to assist do fingersticks at intervals, etc.

    I am appalled at the mainstreaming I see today: children immobile in wheelchairs, with seizures, trachs, you name it. Teachers don't need to be babysitting kids with such problems IMHO and this is what I see parents of special needs children expecting today.. I empathize with parents of, for example, the cerebral palsy child but using the school to babysit someone whose level of understanding precludes any real educational benefit is a ridiculous burden for our public schools to shoulder IMO. I've heard that today's teachers are expected to suction, manage tube feeds, change diapers, manage seizures, etc in the classroom....and from the other children's POV (my kids and their friends) it is disruptive. I sure wouldn't want the liability.

    I'm surprised the school system is not taking a stronger stand against this stuff...if they insist the teachers take on extra responsibilities I would think the school system itself would share liability. And a couple lawsuits would put the district in a real pickle.... but I guess the taxpayers would just have to pick up the slack, eh?
  6. by   Mermaid4
    Well, thankyou for acknowledging your misunderstanding. No where did I EVER say the teachers you speak of don't care. Care doesn't predispose that cognizance is apparent...Nothing anyone says here will detract me from my views and I hope you respect that I am in no way attempting to change yours...That is the purpose of discussion, at least as far as I am concerned...My children go to schools where teachers are not so skittish about getting directly involved. That is not to say that any teachers you represent are fearful, wrong or incompetent, but I would not allow my compromised child to be in a class ( and I thoroughly interview them) where a teacher isn't willing to get involved. That is why they send the paperwork home about "tell me about your child and his or her needs and concerns." If I tell you, you had better be paying attention...I know you aren't going to like this, but I am paying your salary, or at least contributing to it and in Massachusetts, not one but a possibility of two pensions...Live with it..Learn, and if you (teacher) can't or won't be on the same page as I am, you will be teaching other people's children with no prejudice or hard feelings from me....Period...
    And again, you did most definitely misunderstand me...
  7. by   renerian
    When I attended school many moons ago some of the kids were mainstreamed into the standard classes. Actually I learned alot from those children and without having been exposed to it at a young age I may not have developed a sense of what exactly that means for the one with health problems.

    The behavioral children did go to other classes.

    renerian
  8. by   smk1
    Quote from Mermaid4
    Well, thankyou for acknowledging your misunderstanding. No where did I EVER say the teachers you speak of don't care. Care doesn't predispose that cognizance is apparent...Nothing anyone says here will detract me from my views and I hope you respect that I am in no way attempting to change yours...That is the purpose of discussion, at least as far as I am concerned...My children go to schools where teachers are not so skittish about getting directly involved. That is not to say that any teachers you represent are fearful, wrong or incompetent, but I would not allow my compromised child to be in a class ( and I thoroughly interview them) where a teacher isn't willing to get involved. That is why they send the paperwork home about "tell me about your child and his or her needs and concerns." If I tell you, you had better be paying attention...I know you aren't going to like this, but I am paying your salary, or at least contributing to it and in Massachusetts, not one but a possibility of two pensions...Live with it..Learn, and if you (teacher) can't or won't be on the same page as I am, you will be teaching other people's children with no prejudice or hard feelings from me....Period...
    And again, you did most definitely misunderstand me...
    ok please don't take this the wrong way, it just seems that your manner of posting or "tone" seems very demanding and uncompromising. Which, of course no one would want to compromise their childs healthcare, but if I were a teacher (based solely on your posts), I would be hesitant to get too involved, because I would think to myself, "this person doesn't seem likely to be understanding of a mistake." I obviously don't know you, am just basing this off of what I perceive to be the tone to your posts on this thread. In the litigious society that we live in, I have to say that putting yourself in the position of responsibility over someones care, when you aren't trained/educated to do so is a scary thing,...and even more so if you percieve the person that is going to hold you accountable as a mite uncompromising. Again I obviouly don't know you and it is hard to tell tone from a BB, so i apologize if I'm out of line.
  9. by   renerian
    One thing about the net and email is the lack of face to face, the interpretation of body language and tone.

    renerian
  10. by   Katnip
    Mermaid, most people are responding to the OP who says she wants the teachers to be able to give a shot.

    Most teachers I know, especially if warned of a child's potential problem WILL call 911 for a change in mental status. That is VERY different from actually providing medical intervention.

    And the school districts my kids went to, teachers were well educated about signs of abuse and referred those kids the the school social workers.
  11. by   fab4fan
    Just for the sake of clarity, I am not a teacher, nor do I represent teachers in some way. I just happen to fully support the position of the AFT.
  12. by   kidluvinRN
    I also fully support the position of the AFT and think that their position actually supports the need for nurses in the schools. Who better to provide the care than nurses!

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