help!!!! what would you do? - page 2

i work with a nurse that has been acting funny at work. she will leave in the middle of the shift, one day she left and i had to take over her pill pass . i found beer spilled out on the mar. and the... Read More

  1. by   night owl
    Hey Rusty, you're such a gem!...That's why we love you! I'll have to agree with everyone on this...She has to be reported because your patients safety is at risk here. God forbid something should happen and you knew about the drinking, how would you feel then knowing harm to your patient/s could have been prevented? You'll be doing her a great big favor by turning her in so that she can get the help that she needs. She doesn't have to know that it was you who complained does she?
  2. by   Peeps Mcarthur
    Ageless,

    I meant at work, in an enviroment where the alcoholic would want to conceal thier activities.

    Beer also has alot of carbonation to cause burping and other noxiouse fumes.
  3. by   MollyJ
    I would report my concerns to the DON and ASK her who I should call when/if this nurse smells of beer again. While confrontation shouldn't occur with her under the influence, a supervisor needs to document the incident and send her home so that it can be dealt with in a timely fashion (on paid leave until referral to EAP with eval).

    Peeps, many people convince themselves they aren't alcoholics because "they only drink beer" but alcohol is alcohol and it will get you drunk and/or feed your monster if taken in adequate quantities.

    Also, there's the weird behavior, too, which bespeaks against being "framed".
  4. by   Peeps Mcarthur
    Peeps, many people convince themselves they aren't alcoholics because "they only drink beer" but alcohol is alcohol and it will get you drunk and/or feed your monster if taken in adequate quantities
    That's a good point about alcoholics, but at work it's not very stealth.

    This is a "private drinker"........Alcoholics hide thier addiction not spill it on paperwork at thier place of employment.


    I guess I've been "suckered" one too many times myself.

    Have you ever seen or heard of someone having beer at work?

    For me, only at a construction job once.
  5. by   MollyJ
    Yes, peeps, I've heard of people having alcohol at work. You're right, finesse would indicate the dependable vodka in OJ, but as people lose more and more control they do more and more out of control things LIKE just flat bringing their beer to work. Also depending on how eroded a person's financial situation is, beer is pretty cheap. (So, sorry Rusty, it probably WAS domestic...)
  6. by   BadBird
    Definately fill out a statement of concern, notify your direct supervisor, DON, HR. patient safety must come first and this nurse needs help desperately.
  7. by   2MagnoliaTrees
    Don't confront her, inform supervisor ASAP and then the ball is in their court and document when, where, how and what you told the supervisor in case something needs to be brought up later about it.
  8. by   JailRN
    Go to the supevisor and DON. Stick to the facts, not "I thought" or your opinions. You have to protect the patients and that doesn't include doing her job yourself. They pay you one salary, yours. not hers, and believe me, you won't be doing her any favors by enabling her to continue her path.

    Good luck!!
  9. by   Youda
    You must report your SUSPICIONS to the nursing supervisor immediately. That is your duty as a health care provider. Some States have a mandatory criminal misdemeanor conviction (read here losing YOUR license or certification also) if it is ever discovered that you "suspected" and did not report it. So, be very careful here. There is no issue. You MUST tell your supervisior. Remember it isn't up to you to investigate, only to report. After that, go about your own duties caring for your patients and let your administration handle it appropriately.
  10. by   tex
    You are at risk for putting your nursing lic in jeopardy with the state. By not reporting what is going on asap to your immediate supervisor. The state board of nursing can jack with your own ability to work as a nurse. By the fact the patients were and are in immediate jeopardy, and you are not acting as a prudent, sound nurse. They take this as serious as someone sleeping on duty, taking narc's, abuse. Read your nursing practice act....Tex
  11. by   CATHYW
    It is very interesting that she chose beer, as someone else said. Usually it is vodka, because it cannot be smelled. I am suprised some patients haven't complained. Can you imagine being the patient and having someone that reeked of metabolizing beer leaning over you? That would make me sick fer shure!

    As the others said, it isn't just a matter of you being clued in because you were passing her pills for her-innocent patients' lives are at stake. Talk with your supervisor immediately, if you already haven't.:

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