Dealing with tough interviewers

  1. 0
    I'm going back into job hunt mode trying to get my acute care experience. However it's proving rather tough. I've been actually been dumbstruck by some of the responses.

    Out of the four interviews I've been to, only one interview actually put my current job in a positive light.

    Interview #1 for Telemetry responded by: "You are in long term care, and this position requires acute care experience. I know this is an entry level position but why should I choose someone who has been exposed to LTC so long vs a student who I can pay cheaper and is fresh from the hospital setting?"

    Interview #2 for Critical Care: "You made the right choice by taking any nursing job you can get with the current job market. A lot of new grads make the mistake of dismissing nursing homes in their job hunts. A lot of nurses with your background excellent time management skills."

    Interview #3 for Med Surg: "Why choose long term care? It's not exactly the dream job for nurses."

    Interview #4 never really talked about my job. I was the one talking about the job saying how the job required a lot of multitasking, time management, and making judgement calls (especially due the nature of 3rd shift).

    These interviews were from about six months ago, so I never did get the positions. Interview #2's position was actually cancelled and I had a high chance of actually getting that job. Honestly during interview #1 threw that at me, I was basically nervous for the rest of that interview not knowing how I could recover from that.


    Honestly, how can I put more positive spin into my job? The only thing I can think of how it requires a particular skillset to survive.
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  3. 4 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I think you have relevant experience, you are passing meds, managing care, families, doctors. Don't sell yourself and your experierence short. I assume most of your patients come from Med/Surg floors, so you can talk about the level of care you provide and the experience you have with meds, treatments, feeding tubes. I would think any hospital would be happy to hire someone with that kind of experience
  5. 0
    I too, have had that type of response over the years, when going from long term care to acute care.

    Here is a short version from a cover letter I sent. Please feel free to take anything you think may assist you in your search.


    My experience in long term care, polished my time management and organizational skills. I use humor along with sharing of my knowledge to assist in patient/resident care. I learned to make priorites and be able to assess situtations quickly. My knowledge and considerable experience as a leader inspires, teaches, and guides those I supervise by providing a clear vision, clear expectations, and an environment that fosters teamwork.
    I feel confident that my knowledge, skills, and experience are a good fit.
  6. 2
    Quote from Catch22Personified
    Interview #1 for Telemetry responded by: "You are in long term care, and this position requires acute care experience. I know this is an entry level position but why should I choose someone who has been exposed to LTC so long vs a student who I can pay cheaper and is fresh from the hospital setting?"
    I'm sure this was terrifying the first time it was asked without warning. But the next time this happens it is the PERFECT opportunity to sell yourself. Coming from LTC:

    - you are independent, unlike a new grad - you'll require less orientation
    - you can handle 10,0000 patients/shift, unlike a new grad (or RN from another area)
    - you have supervised others and can delegate intelligently (CNAs, med techs, etc)
    - you have proven that you are a safe nurse (assuming no write-ups!)
    - you have experience thinking on your feet, prioritizing, and critically assessing situations independently & with limited support, unlike a new grad (or RN from another area)
    - you are a reliable employee (because you had to be) who doesn't call out sick, show up late, or no-show
    - unlike a new grad who will take any job they get (just like you did), you have much clearer reasons for accepting their position. you're more likely to stick around past the 1 year mark.
    Kooky Korky and Dakeirus like this.
  7. 0
    Quote from coast2coast
    I'm sure this was terrifying the first time it was asked without warning. But the next time this happens it is the PERFECT opportunity to sell yourself. Coming from LTC:

    - you are independent, unlike a new grad - you'll require less orientation
    - you can handle 10,0000 patients/shift, unlike a new grad (or RN from another area)
    - you have supervised others and can delegate intelligently (CNAs, med techs, etc)
    - you have proven that you are a safe nurse (assuming no write-ups!)
    - you have experience thinking on your feet, prioritizing, and critically assessing situations independently & with limited support, unlike a new grad (or RN from another area)
    - you are a reliable employee (because you had to be) who doesn't call out sick, show up late, or no-show
    - unlike a new grad who will take any job they get (just like you did), you have much clearer reasons for accepting their position. you're more likely to stick around past the 1 year mark.
    This is a fantastic reply. My first thought was more like - well, I guess you wouldn't.


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