General Discussion about Filipino RNs currently working in the U.S. - page 10

for filipino rns currently in the us whether still undergoing the proper documentations or already working please kindly share your experiences on this thread. topics maybe from experiences at the... Read More

  1. by   suzanne4
    Quote from Bamexlegs
    Hello! I am pinoy nurse currently working in UK. I have been here for 7 years now, able to get the British citizenship and mortgage. I just passed the NCLEX 75Q and have my visa screen certificate so hopefully will be in USA soon once the retrogression is lifted.
    The threads here are very informative and as well as encouraging for us nurses and I hope that the transition from UK to USA will be as smooth as possible. I will be leaving my husband and two kids behind and will probably bring them over once I a settled there.
    So, I will still continue to keep on reading for new posts in the hope og getting more tips in surviving the great US of A.
    More power to the nurses!!!!
    What ever you do, make sure that your husband and children are included on your DS-230 petition, or it will be at least two years before they will be able to join you. No issue if they are included and then come over later, but if not included, then the long wait goes into effect.

    You will find that there are some agencies that will tell you that you can just petition them once you get over here, do not trust them on that. It will be two years minimum per the US government before they can join you that way.

    Best of luck to you.
  2. by   acetabulum
    REp,you mention abt. Citibank,is it possible that i can use my credit account in this card once im there working?thanks...
  3. by   Bamexlegs
    thank you suzanne!

    will definitely take your advise and will include them in the ds-230 petition. now, i just have to wait patiently for the retrogression to be lifted.

    i also started to read some very interesting topics and managed to get some good tips eg. credit, mortgage, work environment, insurances, pensions and working out your taxes and availing some tax breaks.

    more power and hope to read more form the members and their experiences.

  4. by   Bamexlegs
    If you have an account in HSBC here in UK, you can transfer your account to USA and that includes your CREDIT HISTORY!!! but you have to pay around 100 for the transfer and one big problem is the availability of the bank. I was informed by their rep that it is available in major cities like, LA, San Francisco, Chicago or the big apple. So you have limited number of branch but at least you have a good start there.
    Good luck:spin:
  5. by   florencenightingale
    Nice thread! Great job Lawrence!

    Anyway, here's my question...I am planning of taking Master's Degree in Nursing here in the Philippines and some CEUs, will US accept/credit them?
  6. by   suzanne4
    Quote from florencenightingale
    Nice thread! Great job Lawrence!

    Anyway, here's my question...I am planning of taking Master's Degree in Nursing here in the Philippines and some CEUs, will US accept/credit them?
    The degree will be accepted as a generic master's degree, it will not be accepted for the Advanced Nurse Practitioner or the Clinical Nurse Specialist without completing additional coursework in the US. Both of those areas actually require special licensure from the BON in addition to the regular requirements for the RN license.

    The CEUs must be accepted by the state BON where you are planning to get licensed. Most that are overseas are not accepted, as they are not usually assigned a special number for the course for that particular state, and that is required for them to be used. They will be for your own learning, but not for credit in the US more than likely.
  7. by   Rep
    Quote from acetabulum
    REp,you mention abt. Citibank,is it possible that i can use my credit account in this card once im there working?thanks...
    Your credit history is tie up with your SSN#, So when you are new here and with a new SSN# means your credit history is virtually ZERO.

    I have a HSBC Visa Credit card in the Philippines and when I told this to a employee of the bank where I have a debit account, she said that the HSBC credit card does not mean a thing here even if I have a good history with that account. The thing is my Philippines HSBC Visa has a credit limit much higher than my credit card here.
  8. by   florencenightingale
    Quote from suzanne4
    The degree will be accepted as a generic master's degree, it will not be accepted for the Advanced Nurse Practitioner or the Clinical Nurse Specialist without completing additional coursework in the US. Both of those areas actually require special licensure from the BON in addition to the regular requirements for the RN license.

    The CEUs must be accepted by the state BON where you are planning to get licensed. Most that are overseas are not accepted, as they are not usually assigned a special number for the course for that particular state, and that is required for them to be used. They will be for your own learning, but not for credit in the US more than likely.
    Thanks Suzanne.
  9. by   khirbz
    So is there is basically no use to have a master's degree here in the philippines as it is not credited in US?
  10. by   RNHawaii34
    Quote from khirbz
    so is there is basically no use to have a master's degree here in the philippines as it is not credited in us?
    after working as an rn for 6 months here in the u.s., getting a master's degree sorta crossed my mind, you know, maybe to become an educator, or maybe a nurse practioner..after searching the internet, and calling different universities, i realize how complicated it is to get in the master's program. you need to pass certain requirements, ( gre, gmat, etc.), and the tuition is not cheap either, and as a foreign graduate rn like me, i need to have my bsn transcript evaluated before i can even apply for the master's program. now, from what i understand, if you have a master's degree in the philippines, or man, it needs to be evaluated too, it is not comparable to the master's degree here in the united states...because like suzanne posted above, it will be only credited as a generic master's degree. so, the bottomline? you will still need to get more classes here in the u.s. in addition to your master's done in pi. i don't know what's the man curriculum like in pi, but i am very aware of what it's like here in the u.s. ( i been searching and requested college/university applications, brochures, and their curriculum breakdown, and guess what? you still need to do a coursework, write papers, clinicals, blah blahs...and when you say papers, you have to follow their standards). so, if i were you? probably i will wait until i get a job in the us first, then get my msn. why waste your money there, when your not even sure if your man is credited here, right? for me? probably continue working, and maybe decide later whether to get my master's degree...i'd love to be a nurse practioner, or maybe an nurse educator, nurse manager later, but i am happy that i am working now, and yet i am aware that i still have a lot to learn in this profession. trust me, it is not easy, you might think you all figure it out, but it is not...but hey, it is good to be always be positive..aim high, nothing is impossible !!!
  11. by   suzanne4
    Quote from khirbz
    So is there is basically no use to have a master's degree here in the philippines as it is not credited in US?
    It will not get you an EB-2 for immigration purposes. In the US, you will need to do additional hours to meet requirements for licensure as a Nurse Practitioner or Clinical Nurse Specialist. The hours from PI do not fulfill the requirements needed in the US.

    And as we keep mentioning, nursing in PI is very different from that practiced in the US. Unless you actually complete the degree there, you will find it hard for any university in the US to accept any of the hours or credits from there. This is even the same for those that transfer programs in the US, you always lose quite a few credits.

    If you have not already started, you would be better off doing the degree in the US and get part of the tuition paid by your employer.
  12. by   sparklingchase
    Quote from ancella marie
    I'm working for a year here in Florida, and I can say that my transition was very, very good. My family and I have been blessed by an American who's very supportive from the time that we arrived until the present time. She is like a mother to us. And when we came there were 10 Filipinos who picked us up in the airport, plus this American that I have told you about, and I can tell you that seeing them at around 12 midnight made us feel welcomed and understood - and it meant a lot.
    There were about 15 Filipino families when we came. And they are pretty close to one another. They would come visit us and introduce themselves. They would dropped by on their way to the grocery store to check whether we would want to buy something, since we don't have a car yet.
    There are places here in the United States that have very good public trasportation services but in our place car is a necessity. And I advice you to take driving lessons and pass your driving test - both written and practical there in the Philippines. This saved my husband and myself in taking the DRug test online which would normally take about 4 hours. We only took the written and the practical test to get our licenses.
    At work communication was my problem. I know that I understand spoken English but when I started work, I found it quite alarming that there are people that I simply cannot understand. When this happens I just ask them to repeat what they said and sometimes politely I would ask them to speak slowly.
    A preceptor was assigned to me. And I can say that background in basic bedside nursing would have helped me adjust better, I needed it for my self, not for them, because they will teach you how to do it, but it would have been better if I have the necessary basic skills.
    I hope somehow I have been of help to those who will read this. I wish you all the best of luck
    So glad to hear good news from nurses already working abroad. Hopefully when I'll get the chance to work outside the country, God willing, I'll have a good story to tell from my experience as a certified nurse.
  13. by   john83
    Quote from suzanne4
    If you have not already started, you would be better off doing the degree in the US and get part of the tuition paid by your employer.
    Hi ma'am Suzanne! Are there employers/petitioners who would fully sponsor or at least partially help in the expenses for those who are still here and have not started(eventually start)the immigration process/have started the immigration process?

    Do they have distance learning options given such provision(s) above? I think it would greatly help the nurse in transition(while waiting for the papers).

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