RPN looking to get a job in a Dermatology office in ontario

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    Hi,

    Im a new grad RPN with little but some knowledge of dermatology. Im extremely interested in getting a job in a Dermatology office, but when i look for jobs online they are all for RN's. Are RPN allowed to work in Dermatology offices, or do I have to go back to school to become an RN? If not, What would be the best way to go about getting a job in an office?

    Please help, Im really interested in this,

    Thanks!
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  4. 0
    Quote from J3ssa
    Hi,

    Im a new grad RPN with little but some knowledge of dermatology. Im extremely interested in getting a job in a Dermatology office, but when i look for jobs online they are all for RN's. Are RPN allowed to work in Dermatology offices, or do I have to go back to school to become an RN? If not, What would be the best way to go about getting a job in an office?

    Please help, Im really interested in this,

    Thanks!
    I know that one of the girls I graduated with worked at a derm clinic in Peterborough, not sure of the name then
  5. 0
    Moved to the Canadian forum
  6. 0
    Hello -

    I am and Alberta LPN and for the last 16 months, I have held a 1.0 RFT position at the Alberta Health Services Dermatology Clinic in Edmonton.

    Absolutely, LPN's work in Dermatology - there are 2 of us at my specific clinic. There is no difference in our scope of practice compared to RN's.

    Dermatology Clinics with multiple physicians usually have a variety of different clinics within the speciality with very different skills for each clinic.

    Clinics I work in within Dermatology:

    Phototherapy: LPN's run their own clinic here. We collaborate with physicians, process orders, monitor patients, administer UVB, UVA and PUVA treatments to treat various derm concerns. Cool to "see" your own patients.

    General Dermatology: Room patients, medical history, assist in biopsies, wound care, administer medications (Kenalog, DPC, lidocaine, Cantharone, Botox), suturing, suture removal, phone calls (results, patient concerns, pharmacy, home care).

    Leg Ulcer Clinic: Various highly specialized dressings, orders tests (ADPI + toe pressures), ordering and collaborate and troubleshoot with homecare => highly intensive and messy clinic.

    Patch Allergy Testing Clinic: Apply the patches, remove the patches, transcribe interpretations.

    Surgical Clinic: Prepare surgical traps, sterile procedures, lidocaine admin, pre and post procedure health assessment, post op dressing changes, obstain consent, direct surgeon assist with procedures. See patients in follow up.

    Melanoma Clinic: Order tests (CXR, PET, CT, blood work), assist the interdisciplinary team (Dermatologist + Surgeon + Medical Oncologist) treat and assess very sick patients. You form very close relationships in this clinic.

    Derm can be hard to get into, it's very busy and it's not one of those laid back clinics some nurses hope to get into when considering leaving the floor for a more laid back job. Derms see many patients and there are many procedures going on. It can be repetitive and just as busy as working on the floor.

    Good luck and PM me with any questions.
  7. 0
    Quote from r90s
    Hello - I am and Alberta LPN and for the last 16 months, I have held a 1.0 RFT position at the Alberta Health Services Dermatology Clinic in Edmonton. Absolutely, LPN's work in Dermatology - there are 2 of us at my specific clinic. There is no difference in our scope of practice compared to RN's. Dermatology Clinics with multiple physicians usually have a variety of different clinics within the speciality with very different skills for each clinic. Clinics I work in within Dermatology: Phototherapy: LPN's run their own clinic here. We collaborate with physicians, process orders, monitor patients, administer UVB, UVA and PUVA treatments to treat various derm concerns. Cool to "see" your own patients. General Dermatology: Room patients, medical history, assist in biopsies, wound care, administer medications (Kenalog, DPC, lidocaine, Cantharone, Botox), suturing, suture removal, phone calls (results, patient concerns, pharmacy, home care). Leg Ulcer Clinic: Various highly specialized dressings, orders tests (ADPI + toe pressures), ordering and collaborate and troubleshoot with homecare => highly intensive and messy clinic. Patch Allergy Testing Clinic: Apply the patches, remove the patches, transcribe interpretations. Surgical Clinic: Prepare surgical traps, sterile procedures, lidocaine admin, pre and post procedure health assessment, post op dressing changes, obstain consent, direct surgeon assist with procedures. See patients in follow up. Melanoma Clinic: Order tests (CXR, PET, CT, blood work), assist the interdisciplinary team (Dermatologist + Surgeon + Medical Oncologist) treat and assess very sick patients. You form very close relationships in this clinic. Derm can be hard to get into, it's very busy and it's not one of those laid back clinics some nurses hope to get into when considering leaving the floor for a more laid back job. Derms see many patients and there are many procedures going on. It can be repetitive and just as busy as working on the floor. Good luck and PM me with any questions.
    Hi r90s

    Just came across your post and I find where you are working to sound quite interesting
    I'm thinking of relocating to Edmonton sometime in the near future. Would you be ok with me PMing you for more info?
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    Absolutely!!
  9. 0
    Alberta LPN Just curious to know if you had to take any added skills to work in the dermatology clinic, sounds like you have a large role inclusive of suturing ....wow, sounds like a very interesting place to work. Never seen those postings come up.
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    All the training I got was on the job - Derm has a pretty steep learning curve compared to a lot of other areas.

    Alberta Health Services clinics are hard to get into, period... and Derm is even harder - the postings rarely come up. Lots of skills used and the hours are great - Monday to Friday 08:00 to 16:15, all stats off, plus two weeks off at Christmas.
  11. 1
    Quote from r90s
    All the training I got was on the job - Derm has a pretty steep learning curve compared to a lot of other areas.

    Alberta Health Services clinics are hard to get into, period... and Derm is even harder - the postings rarely come up. Lots of skills used and the hours are great - Monday to Friday 08:00 to 16:15, all stats off, plus two weeks off at Christmas.

    I am SOOOO glad you stated that. I've got 2003 start date and can't even get an interview for clinic positions!

    A lot of posters here think I make it up that you just can't walk into a clinic job.
    loriangel14 likes this.


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