Things nursing school FAILED to tell us - page 5

Wouldn't it have been great if they told us this stuff in nursing school? NOTE: A LOT OF MINE WERE MEANT FOR LTC NURSES The human body is capable of holding 200 cups of H2O/coffee in your... Read More

  1. by   gizelda196
    Timothy

    Great Post!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Thanks
  2. by   scrmblr
    Quote from Franemtnurse
    How back-biting and nasty nurses can be with one another. How sad and shocking!!! These are people who have the lives of patients in their hands and have to do teamwork at times whether or not they like it. Why not do it in a friendly atmosphere? And an aide who has been there for ever think s/he has authority over a newly hired BSN and can tell him/her how to do his/her job.
    I've learned that listening to the aide is a really good idea. Put your ego aside and listen...Sometimes they will teach you things you need to know
  3. by   kadokin
    Quote from scrmblr
    I've learned that listening to the aide is a really good idea. Put your ego aside and listen...Sometimes they will teach you things you need to know
    Any nurse who hasn't figured this out all ready needs to get a clue, but quick. What particular incident,if any, finally brought you to this realization. Go ahead and share w/us, we love it. Oh, and while you're at it, listen to your pt as well.
  4. by   HappyJaxRN
    Quote from A476
    I THINK THAT ALL OF THAT IS NEED TO KNOW INFORMATION. HOW DARE THEY NOT SAY SOMETHING ABOUT THAT STUFF. WHEN I START SCHOOL I WILL HAVE ALL OF THOSE QUESTIONS ANSWERED BEFORE I SET FOOT IN A CLINICAL . BUT MAYBE NOT. I HOPE I NEVER RUN INTO PROJECTILE VOMMITTING OR TOO MUCH POOP.

    :chuckle Wishful thinking unless you're going to be a pencil pusher....And er um...you may see a lot of it in school....I know this one girl in my class, she would always get the poop patients....she would be up to her elbows sometimes by what she was describing...and she would go on and on about it for a couple of days...what does she do now as a nurse? You'd never guess........:uhoh21: She works in the GI lab! Hhhmmmm! Must be fate.
  5. by   psychonurse
    Things I have learned since I got out of nursing school....(let me think it has been soooooooo looonnnggg ago)........

    You will have more than 1 or 2 patients when you get out of school. That is all that I had when I was in school..it was a great suprise to me when I got out of school and got my first assignment as a GN.

    You will learn that you can eat food no matter how foul the smells were in the last room that you were in before you ate.

    You will eat cold Thanksgiving food even though the color of the gravy and the sputum that you are sucking out of their lungs is the same color
  6. by   cindyRN 2006
    SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO Funny.
  7. by   fusster
    That patients will hide cigarettes in places you'd never guess to look (and may never find), then act completely innocent when you ask them about the smoke coming out of their room

    That people have what i'll just call "natural urges" even when they're incredibly ill, and their significant other has no problem satisfying them, even when they're in the hospital
  8. by   MamaTheNurse
    Quote from karenG

    that patients will tell me one thing and the doctor something completely different!

    that the really ill patients are the ones who never complain

    NEVER EVER use the word 'quiet' - its fatal and will result in the shift from hell
    true dat!!!
    also, as an RN, I've learned more tricks that make mine and my patients' lives easier from old LPN's and PCT's than I can count - for example, hooda thought shaving cream could be used in bath water to keep very smelly patients fragrant or put in styrofoam cups and placed strategically around a room would effectively eliminate that rotten meat smell that only a GI bleed can produce......(while he was in the room, I had a doc ask me why we had the shaving cream in cups around the room - I answered very tactfully, as the patient was alert and oriented (for once in ICU) - "Aromatherapy" )
  9. by   Zee_RN
    ......that you'll spend time on your hands and knees at the bedside, trying to get the bedside table to slide under the bed or to the measure the drainage in a chest tube drainage set (Pleuravac).

    ......how to transport a ventilated patient with invasive lines and 7 IV pumps to Radiology (at least one floor below you) for his umpteenth CT Scan.

    ......how to deal with the family member that has *some* medical knowledge (just enough to be dangerous but not enough to really know anything).

    ......that some people can literally cough out a dobhoff tube (amazing thing, to see the dobhoff going in the nose, coming out the mouth and laying there across the patient's chest).

    ......that the larger and more immobile the patient, the more frequently they will soil the bed.

    ......that the first thing your 3:00 AM admission (dx: nausea & vomiting for 3 days) will want is something to eat because "I haven't eaten for 3 days!"
  10. by   TennNurse
    also, as an RN, I've learned more tricks that make mine and my patients' lives easier from old LPN's and PCT's than I can count - for example, hooda thought shaving cream could be used in bath water to keep very smelly patients fragrant or put in styrofoam cups and placed strategically around a room would effectively eliminate that rotten meat smell that only a GI bleed can produce


    Learn something new every day... now THIS is valuable information!!

    I learned that the process of signing into the ER causes an instantaneous urge to pee, especially if it is one of those rare (you didn't hear me say this) slow days when we can call someone back right away.

    I've learned that there is no ailment, injury, or amount of bodily fluid loss known that will keep a pt in the ER from wanting food within 5 minutes of checking in.

    I've learned that the majority of the population, when thinking that they may stop by the ER later on in the day, say between 11a and 11p, will decide not to eat anything all day. Once gowned, IV'd, and hooked to the monitor, they will reveal this fact in the most plaintive tones imaginable, as if this was inflicted upon them by hospital staff.

    I've learned that chips, coke, and a dash around the waiting room will cure 99% of cases of pediatric N/V/D.

    I've learned that so many parents, when bringing their child to the ER, relinquish not only their responsibility for their child's health, but also for their manners, toilet training, and babysitting.

    I've learned that 99% of the working population will check in, converse with RN and MD throughout multiple examinations, engage in Q&A regarding dx and treatment, but will wait until after all discharge papers are typed up and they have been taken out of the computer before mentioning, "Oh, I need a note for work."

    I've learned that any civilian who has ever heard of Toradol is allergic to it.

    That's all I can think of right now.
  11. by   SheriLynnRN
    Quote from jess78911
    no matter how you describe your day to your significant other, they will never understand what your day at work has been like (wouldn't you love to be able to bring them to work for a day?

    This is so true! My husband always has a thousand "logical" suggestions on how I could have made things easier on myself, or how he would have done it. He just doesn't get it. There's a huge difference between caring for surigcal patients and paving runways for Air Force fighter jets.
  12. by   grace90
    I don't remember my instructor telling us that after 8 hours of listening to a crack addict tell you why she HAS to have more pain meds and having 2 doctors refuse 4 times to order more, that when she threatens to go AMA, undoes her IV line from her PICC and gets ready to get her clothes, that you almost gladly get the form for her to sign and don't want to discourage her from leaving, even tho you do, because you're SO sick of her constant whining and fake puking and heaving.
    Whew, that's a mouthful. My last shift in a nutshell. Ok, a coconut shell.
  13. by   danggirl
    Ha ha this is great. Yeah...they failed to tell us how many different bodily fluids can come out of how many different orifaces all in the same person. I don't recall anyone telling me to have as many pockets as possible and to try to fill them with half the dressing cart and half the med cart just to get down the hall. I loved the one about the bladder...a nurse can drink gallons during the day and only pee twice: once when she gets up in the morning and once when she gets off shift 14hours later. Running shoes can be your best friend. Tape and/or a pair of hemostats can fix most problems. Laugh at yourself and your patient will relax. DON"T ice the ng tube. and no matter how many time you wash your hands, you still go home with the smell of someones pits on your arms.

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