My best orientation mistakes - page 3

by skicoachrn 22,507 Views | 61 Comments

I am week 4 in a 6 week orientation as a new RN in LTC/Rehab. I have done some really stupid stuff so far :lol2: Highlights: 10)__ Tried to hook up an IV antibiotic with kangaroo (g-tube) tubing! 9)__ Unhooked a... Read More


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    Ruby Vee. that is a priceless story!!!!!!!!!
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    Quote from bradleau
    Sure hope that most of what you wrote is "being funny". Where were you during clinicals when the insulin syringe was hopefully learned. I would be very afraid to have someone like you caring for anyone in my hospital. I can understand the IV machine issues....but when I came off vacation and found that I could NOT remove an IV line from the pump...I found someone who showed me that we NOW had the new safety clamp. Also I knew enough to follow a line from pt to pump, etc. Yes, I did get peed upon....by an adult that was baby like. Kind of forgot about that issue as I did not work in peds or nursery.
    I guess my most strange thing that happened, while in school, I went into a male patients room. First thing noted was female breasts. I continued to assess and found the appropiate penis. I excused myself, found my instructer, and gave her a good laugh. This man was being treated with female hormones for his cancer...there for explaining the breasts.
    I have also tripped over family sleeping on the floor,tripped over a standing wheelchair scale...receiving a score for least graceful of 9.5 from my two patients.
    I would hope that you can get supervised practice with the equiptment you will be using, and practice on your own with supplies that are not needed for patients. Right now you are DANGEROUS!
    Aren't you being a little harsh??? She was on orientation, nervous, and did NOT administer a lethal anything! And if her preceptor was appropriately orienting her, these IV pumps, doses, syringes, etc, should have already been covered. Perhaps she was not being trained well? And no, I don't think calling her DANGEROUS is helpful, either.

    And how is it 'a good laugh' that your cancer patient had 'breasts' from hormone treatment? Would it have been just as funny if he had been having female hormone treatment for a sex change operation?
    JHU2016, LaughingRN, grownuprosie, and 9 others like this.
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    i agree with dbs candy i very much fail to see the humor in laughing at a patient undergoing hormone tx for cancer.

    but i disagree with 'being a little harsh' i dont understand why there would be any reason to draw up insulin ina 60 cc syringe. does anyone else think that is insane?
    not to mention it is a high alert medication.
    hey at leas the OP is open and honest about these things.
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    How much hormone therapy does it take to get breasts. Anyway. Got my eye on a really cute sundress for thus spring.
    whichone'spink, Sparrowhawk, and SBarn like this.
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    Oh my! What I have to look forward to in a few months when I start clinicals in my LVN program! So glad that there are topics like this out there so I know how much "fun" we'll all be having!
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    Well, this is a humor thread after all. Goodness, such expertise here....that is the thing about nursing that is hard, all the EXPERTS who never make a mistake....ever. Obviously the insulin thing did not get me very far. After I opened the syringe and looked at the bottle I went DUH and laughed a little bit. It was funny how stupid it was. Sorry I freaked you all out a little bit. Same with the kangaroo tube. I opened the package, looked at the ends of the tube and banged myself on the forehead for wasting a whole tube feeding set...funny, no? My preceptor laughed with me too. Should I have cried and quit? Should she have reported me as unsafe? If that is the general consensus, than my humanness makes me unfit to be a nurse. I'll leave it to all you superpowers out there. :bowingpur
    JHU2016, diva rn, CameoRN, and 14 others like this.
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    I am a baby beginner nurse anyway. While I feel very insecure and awkward in my learning, I know my heart is absolutely there with my patients, and I do not do what I feel even slightly uncomfortable doing.
    dbscandy likes this.
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    skicoachrn, you are doing fine because you DO recognize how DUH something looks when it's not correct. I've been nursing for 36 (OHMY!) years and there are still times I will make a mistake. Because experience and time do NOT make you a perfect nurse. Don't believe that from anybody. It simply brings memorization of rote activities, a deeper knowledge base, details that will become second-nature and critical thinking which is inborn in many people (alas, some NEVER get it, including nurses who do [B]tasks[B] very well).

    Especially today when there are so many changes and advances, and the work is craziness non-stop, mistakes can, and do, happen to the best of us!!! You need to simply keep doing what you're doing. Question everything, even if it seems you question too much. Someday soon, you will find yourself gradually feeling more confident, more self-assured and answering your own questions with your experience & knowledge.

    Best to you as you find your way. I hope you will always have co-workers & leadership who will nurture you and help you keep the faith in yourself and your abilities.
    JHU2016 likes this.
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    Quote from bradleau
    Sure hope that most of what you wrote is "being funny". Where were you during clinicals when the insulin syringe was hopefully learned. I would be very afraid to have someone like you caring for anyone in my hospital.
    I would hope that you can get supervised practice with the equiptment you will be using, and practice on your own with supplies that are not needed for patients. Right now you are DANGEROUS!

    That is incredibly rude. The error was caught before it did any damage, and unfortunately with all you learn in four full years of school, you are bound to forget or mess up one or two things. No one was hurt. This is a humor thread! Obviously it's scary or nerve-wracking at the time but you have to be able to laugh at your mistakes later or you'll have a nervous breakdown by the time your first year of nursing is over!

    Also I do understand the humor about the patient with breasts story...she wasn't laughing AT the patient, but rather by how shocked she was to see breasts on a man! She found out AFTER why it was, I'm sure it was just quite the unexpected surprise until she realized what the reason was!

    The story about the poor Spanish-speaking woman is pretty cute too! I wonder WHAT on earth kind of son you have to have who would teach the nurse to swear at his own mother (:O) but I know people who have been taught...ahem, "the wrong thing to say" by a native speaker of another language and it's always pretty hysterical when you find out what you've actually been saying!
    Last edit by kaiasunshine on Dec 19, '10
    canoehead and AmandaTheNurse like this.
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    Thanks dbscandy. and everyone for the supportive words.


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