What the chances are for a new grad with a English as Second language to get hired?

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    I was graduated in June, 2012, and I have sent a lot of applications out, but I never get a interview from any hospital. English is my second language and I do have a accent, and does this mean that hiring manager won't consider me at all because of that? Anyone is a nurse recruiter or insider please tell me if I stand a chance!!!! Thx
  2. 6 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    In my area, the job market is TIGHT, no matter what your first, second or even third language is!
  4. 0
    Quote from ColleenRN2B
    In my area, the job market is TIGHT, no matter what your first, second or even third language is!
    But at least you have a better chance during the interview, and I am sure you can nail the interview once you have one.
  5. 0
    Quote from kindlylili
    But at least you have a better chance during the interview, and I am sure you can nail the interview once you have one.
    Speaking as both a former new grad and someone who has seen the next generations of new grads join our facility...don't be so sure. There's a wide mix of people who got hired, and a wide mix of people who didn't. And there were both fluent English speakers as well as those speaking with accents in each group.

    I think your accent will be a major issue only if it's hard to understand you when speaking English, or if your grammar skills are very poor.

    I do agree with Colleen: the market is very tight for all nurses regardless of who/what/where and how you speak. Most new grads are taking 6-12 months or more to land any job. So in all honesty, it may be THAT and not your accent that is not landing you interviews. Or it may be that you're up against stronger applicants: those with a higher GPA, more experience, more flexibility when it comes to hours or specialty, networking connections and/or are simply in the right place at the right time.

    Just keep trying, that's all you can do. Best of luck.
  6. 0
    Quote from Meriwhen

    Speaking as both a former new grad and someone who has seen the next generations of new grads join our facility...don't be so sure. There's a wide mix of people who got hired, and a wide mix of people who didn't. And there were both fluent English speakers as well as those speaking with accents in each group.

    I think your accent will be a major issue only if it's hard to understand you when speaking English, or if your grammar skills are very poor.

    I do agree with Colleen: the market is very tight for all nurses regardless of who/what/where and how you speak. Most new grads are taking 6-12 months or more to land any job. So in all honesty, it may be THAT and not your accent that is not landing you interviews. Or it may be that you're up against stronger applicants: those with a higher GPA, more experience, more flexibility when it comes to hours or specialty, networking connections and/or are simply in the right place at the right time.

    Just keep trying, that's all you can do. Best of luck.
    Thanks so much for the input, and yes, I will continue to apply for jobs.
  7. 0
    Also keep in mind that if English isnt your first language, presumably you are bilingual, which, depending where you live can be a HUGE plus. Play that up-let them know that you are fluent verbally and with written language in your native language. Focus on areas where there is a large population of people that speak your language...you know what I mean?

    Best of luck from one new grad to another!!
  8. 0
    The job market is so tight right now that anything can be a problem, things that once were not a issue now can be problem. Anything such as language, grades, too tall, too short, too ugly, too old, too this and too that will be a way in which they can exclude you because there are so many applicants they have the upper hand and only pick the cream of the crop. This will change for sure we just don't know when...I think in about 3 years.


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