New Grads: Lets take action together!!!! - page 2

by aubrn

2,531 Visits | 17 Comments

New Grads, I just have a simple idea to help us all out of this situation where we cannot get jobs because no hospitals are hiring new graduates anymore. I think if we ban together and get petitions going stating that since... Read More


  1. 4
    The big problem is money. New grad orientations/preceptorships cost a LOT of money for the facility. They are finishing what school didn't do (bummer for you).

    If you can get someone who can hit the floor after a week, vs someone who needs 2-3 months with another nurse (costs 2 nurses for one set of patients), you take the one who can hit the floor running.

    School ripped you off. None of these preceptorships were EVER done until maybe 10 years ago. Hospitals know this because they have to clean up the mess....it's just not cost effective.

    Yes- it is very unfair for you. In the meantime, get ANY type of experience....it's not the end of the world to not get into a hospital at first- take what is there.

    Also- whatever you say won't phase them since you aren't their employee. They'll just wait for the time when they do hire new grads- and take the ones who haven't complained about them.

    It's really lousy and disappointing. But get what experience you can- that shows the willingness to do what ya gotta do, when you have a chance at getting into a hospital.
  2. 2
    Short handed does not mean shortage. Right now the hospitals are PURPOSEFULLY not filling positions with either experienced or inexperienced nurses. The economy sucks. They are taking advantage of that. There are tons of openings listed on hospital websites and through recruiters month after month after month. They have no intention of hiring, only maintaining the funds that were allocated to them through the corporate budget by keeping the position technically open, but not really.

    The medical community is very political. You do NOT want to start making a nasty, entitled sounding stink the very minute you come out of the gate. Not if you want to work. It is counterproductive.
    witc and joanna73 like this.
  3. 4
    Im glad to see that there are people here with common sense. I am a new grad and have friends that had a hard time getting jobs as new grads. I think what many new grads dont realize is the fact that just because you became an RN, doesnt mean you will do well.

    The hospital has to invest lots of money into a new grad. Most new grads going to a med/surg floor are getting 2-3 months of full time training. That amount can be anywhere from $10,000-15,000 depending your pay. I have seen people that graduated that struggle and just cannot "get it" when it comes to the actual work. For a hospital to invest this money into someone who might not work out doesnt make much sense. Add on hospitals with internships that offer critical care, they invest even more money with 2-3 months of a stipened pay of say $2k a month for 3 months, then 2 more months of following. $20,000 risk is not a small risk.

    Just read through the posts here and you will find many unhappy new grads contemplating quitting their jobs for something else. If the hospital invested $10k into an employee and they leave....they are in the hole for nothing. You have to look at both sides of the story.
    llg, Meriwhen, workingharder, and 1 other like this.
  4. 0
    It's very unfortunate, but everyone is affected by the economy, not just nurses. I have friends working in other fields who are also struggling. For now, new grads need to try to make the best of their situation.

    Yes, nurses are working short everywhere. However, employers have no intention of hiring the required staff. Maybe in another few years. Experienced nurses are also being cut. Some of these posts are very unrealistic. You can be as upset as you like, but it isn't going to change right now. Keep networking and applying. Something will come up.
  5. 0
    Quote from 8mpg
    Im glad to see that there are people here with common sense. I am a new grad and have friends that had a hard time getting jobs as new grads. I think what many new grads dont realize is the fact that just because you became an RN, doesnt mean you will do well.

    The hospital has to invest lots of money into a new grad. Most new grads going to a med/surg floor are getting 2-3 months of full time training. That amount can be anywhere from $10,000-15,000 depending your pay. I have seen people that graduated that struggle and just cannot "get it" when it comes to the actual work. For a hospital to invest this money into someone who might not work out doesnt make much sense. Add on hospitals with internships that offer critical care, they invest even more money with 2-3 months of a stipened pay of say $2k a month for 3 months, then 2 more months of following. $20,000 risk is not a small risk.

    Just read through the posts here and you will find many unhappy new grads contemplating quitting their jobs for something else. If the hospital invested $10k into an employee and they leave....they are in the hole for nothing. You have to look at both sides of the story.

    I agree with all of this, but for the fact that 5 years ago, facilities were doing all of the above costly training PLUS paying sign on bonuses, relocation fees, loan repayment, and giving away great benefits, life FREE daycare; all to new grads. Now, they are not doing any of those things, and don't want to hire new grads. It is not because of the cost of training (because they happily paid out of the a** before), it is because the economy is bad, and they feel as though they can do what they want, without repercussions.

    The new grads of today, do not have the sense of entitlement that those of the early 2000s had. We know it is hard, we just want a chance. No sign on bonuses, no relocation, just a chance.
  6. 1
    Quote from DreamNurseRN
    I think the OPs point is not all hospitals are NOT hiring, so there is demand for RNs, but most hospitals are not hiring New Grads. And honestly it irks my nerves. All of the sudden with a down economy, although they still need nurses, New Grads are "too much of an investment", when 5-6 years ago, the were paying out the *ss in signon bonuses, relocation fees, and loan repayment for those New Grads. But now, it is "too much of an investment" just to give a New Grad a d*mn job.

    And I ditto, what the OP said about positions being open for months. I called a nurse recruiter at a local hospital, about position that I had seen open for six months or better; and she told me point blank "We are not hiring new grads, the hospital would rather invest less in experienced nurses, right now. And to tell you the truth don't know when we will hire new grads again".

    You can bet when things do turn around, and the nurses who are working just because they have to, go back how to be stay at home moms, and those they want to retire finally do, and those that really never liked nursing anyway leave for other fields; when all of the facilities are back on their knees, I will write them a letter just to let them know, the really shot themselves in the foot with this.

    Draw up the petition, I'll sign it!
    On average, it costs $70,000 to train a new grad. Sad fact it, nursing school is not preparing (most of) us to be nurses when we graduate. School is training us to pass the NCLEX. I'm a new grad, and I was very ?lucky? to get the toughest clinical instructors at my school. Thank goodness for them wupping my butt, or I'd be floundering now. I see 4th semester student who are graduating in 1 month in preceptorship on my floor and it TERRIFIES me. Sorry.

    Quote from dirtyhippiegirl
    I think anger would be better directed at the nursing school recruiters who will talk until they're blue in the face about nursing shortages, recession-proof careers, etc. to get you to invest your student loan money in their program.
    Word. All about the $$$$$. Of course the nursing schools (especially the expensive, convenient online ones) are touting the "nursing shortage."

    Quote from xtxrn
    The big problem is money. New grad orientations/preceptorships cost a LOT of money for the facility. They are finishing what school didn't do (bummer for you).

    If you can get someone who can hit the floor after a week, vs someone who needs 2-3 months with another nurse (costs 2 nurses for one set of patients), you take the one who can hit the floor running.

    School ripped you off. None of these preceptorships were EVER done until maybe 10 years ago. Hospitals know this because they have to clean up the mess....it's just not cost effective.

    Yes- it is very unfair for you. In the meantime, get ANY type of experience....it's not the end of the world to not get into a hospital at first- take what is there.

    Also- whatever you say won't phase them since you aren't their employee. They'll just wait for the time when they do hire new grads- and take the ones who haven't complained about them.

    It's really lousy and disappointing. But get what experience you can- that shows the willingness to do what ya gotta do, when you have a chance at getting into a hospital.
    Another thing to consider is that hospitals can always find registry & per diem nurses. In my area, per diem starts around $55 and goes up to $75-80/hr. Almost every nurse I know that's worked for >1 year has a second per diem job. Why pay to train a new grad when you can bring in a registry nurse? Long-term it doesn't work as well (theoretically), but then, most new grads stay < 1 year anyway, so they're not a good long-term investment either.

    Quote from 8mpg
    Im glad to see that there are people here with common sense. I am a new grad and have friends that had a hard time getting jobs as new grads. I think what many new grads dont realize is the fact that just because you became an RN, doesnt mean you will do well.

    The hospital has to invest lots of money into a new grad. Most new grads going to a med/surg floor are getting 2-3 months of full time training. That amount can be anywhere from $10,000-15,000 depending your pay. I have seen people that graduated that struggle and just cannot "get it" when it comes to the actual work. For a hospital to invest this money into someone who might not work out doesnt make much sense. Add on hospitals with internships that offer critical care, they invest even more money with 2-3 months of a stipened pay of say $2k a month for 3 months, then 2 more months of following. $20,000 risk is not a small risk.

    Just read through the posts here and you will find many unhappy new grads contemplating quitting their jobs for something else. If the hospital invested $10k into an employee and they leave....they are in the hole for nothing. You have to look at both sides of the story.
    Thank god there's other people with good noggins on their shoulders. Hopefully you're one of the lucky new grads that has a job.

    Quote from DreamNurseRN
    I agree with all of this, but for the fact that 5 years ago, facilities were doing all of the above costly training PLUS paying sign on bonuses, relocation fees, loan repayment, and giving away great benefits, life FREE daycare; all to new grads. Now, they are not doing any of those things, and don't want to hire new grads. It is not because of the cost of training (because they happily paid out of the a** before), it is because the economy is bad, and they feel as though they can do what they want, without repercussions.

    The new grads of today, do not have the sense of entitlement that those of the early 2000s had. We know it is hard, we just want a chance. No sign on bonuses, no relocation, just a chance.
    It's not JUST because the economy is bad, but because healthcare is becoming more and more about cost-effectiveness. Personally, I blame the CEOs/VPs/Board of Directors of the insurance companies. MDs (and consequently hospitals) are getting paid less and less for their services. They increasingly have to see more and more patients per day to meet their costs. It's all about what you can bring to the table, and frankly, we as new grads don't have a lot. Blame our schools for exaggerating the "nursing shortage" and then not training us so that we're ready to go after graduating.
    llg likes this.
  7. 2
    I totally understand your want to petition. Some of the above posts remind me of the nurses I work with....like to take the slaps in the face for fear of losing a job or hoping that staying positive equates to employment. The staffing ratios are totally unsafe so nurses are needed! Even tough there are freezes the nurses that do have work are glorified SLAVES...I've had 10 patients on night shift, yes medsurg but some can't turn themselves, are AMS and fall risks, want pain meds round the clock, and then MD ***** at you for calling them at 4am (sorry Dr this hospital is open 24hrs, dont be on call if you dont want to be called/paged) I switched critical care and witness them pushing RNs on stepdown to 4pts and ICU RN's to 3. How is that safe?!? Nowadays if you dont know someone who can get you in, and are lucky enough to find work you are stuck with a 2 to 3 year contract which leaves you paying the hospital back $5,000-10,000 when they didn't give you a sign on bonus in the first place. Unfortunately the society we live in just watches and shakes their head in hopes they dont have to deal with it. Kudos to you for wanting to be pro-active. I am employed but I will help however I can, just let me know how.
    Last edit by janfrn on Nov 21, '11 : Reason: text speak
    FocusRN and wetzoo like this.
  8. 1
    The hospitals don't really need new grads. It's expensive to train you, it will take months before you are truly functional in the position you take. And you may get the job and realize you hate it! It sounds like you have a lot of energy and that is definitely a good thing. Sending letters to hospital CEO's telling them when you do get experience, (finally), you won't consider working for them...BAD IDEA. You should never burn bridges. I understand how frustrating it is to be a new grad and just not be able to find a job when you were all but promised multitudes of opportunities in nursing school. DirtyHippie is right, the nursing schools need to address this issue instead of trying to enroll massive numbers of $tudent$. Maybe you just need to look outside the box. Go rural, apply in Alaska, don't be afraid to move if it is feasible for you. Please don't get a reputation for being this aggressive. It won't service you in the future.
    joanna73 likes this.


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