No I wouldn't recommend nursing - page 11

It surprises me how many students are going into nursing. I had my BSN since 1992 and have worked in the hospitals since then. Nursing is back-breaking labor with the reoccurring role of cleaning... Read More

  1. by   mtngrl
    I left my low-paying hospital job in med/surg due to inadequate orientation, and the fact I was to be the charge nurse and the only RN on the floor! I did not feel that was safe for the patients at all! I am a new nurse! It is too much responsibility when you are the only RN with 30 patients on the floor and you are the only one that can do the IV pushes, etc. I would spend so much time doing the LPN's pushes that I would barely see my own patients! It is just not fair to have one RN on the floor and 5 LPN's. I do contract nursing now. A few hours a day, low stress, and much better pay.
  2. by   nursemelani
    Quote from mtngrl
    I left my low-paying hospital job in med/surg due to inadequate orientation, and the fact I was to be the charge nurse and the only RN on the floor! I did not feel that was safe for the patients at all! I am a new nurse! It is too much responsibility when you are the only RN with 30 patients on the floor and you are the only one that can do the IV pushes, etc. I would spend so much time doing the LPN's pushes that I would barely see my own patients! It is just not fair to have one RN on the floor and 5 LPN's. I do contract nursing now. A few hours a day, low stress, and much better pay.
    What is contract nursing?
  3. by   marineRN
    Well, this is my first post. I have been reading threads off and on for the past four years. I graduate with my BSN in May, and have finally decided to post.

    A couple of things I have learned:

    1. If you do not want to be discouraged about nursing, do not read a post with a title "No I wouldn't recommend nursing".

    2. Some people like to complain. I had a Master Sergeant who used to tell us that we could either be a thermostat or a thermometer. Meaning you can simply mirror the environment you are in or you can change it. Not that I don't understand the frustrations of the nurses who have posted, I have worked as a tech for the past few years and can see some of those aspects. However, we all have the rights as civilian workers to walk if the job is that bad. I don't understand complaining about a job for years and to keep doing it.

    The thruth of the matter is some people are unhappy people. They believe that if they get this degree or that job they would be happy, just like they thought that becoming an RN would be the thing to make them happy. I believe that when people become that negative about their selfappointed position in life, they need to take a step back and reassess their situation. If asked what changes would make them happy in their job, most would not have an answer. The ones that did would probably still be unhappy if all requests were met.

    Happy Living.....
  4. by   scampi710
    Quote from marineRN
    Well, this is my first post. I have been reading threads off and on for the past four years. I graduate with my BSN in May, and have finally decided to post.

    A couple of things I have learned:

    1. If you do not want to be discouraged about nursing, do not read a post with a title "No I wouldn't recommend nursing".

    2. Some people like to complain. I had a Master Sergeant who used to tell us that we could either be a thermostat or a thermometer. Meaning you can simply mirror the environment you are in or you can change it. Not that I don't understand the frustrations of the nurses who have posted, I have worked as a tech for the past few years and can see some of those aspects. However, we all have the rights as civilian workers to walk if the job is that bad. I don't understand complaining about a job for years and to keep doing it.

    The thruth of the matter is some people are unhappy people. They believe that if they get this degree or that job they would be happy, just like they thought that becoming an RN would be the thing to make them happy. I believe that when people become that negative about their selfappointed position in life, they need to take a step back and reassess their situation. If asked what changes would make them happy in their job, most would not have an answer. The ones that did would probably still be unhappy if all requests were met.

    Happy Living.....
    Welcome to nursing :hatparty:

    Nursing is not a job. It is a profession, and as such we have professional ethics, responsibilities, and standards to effect and perform quality life saving care.

    In our profession there are multitudinous barriers we have to overcome on a daily basis if we are to fulfill our professional standards of care.

    Our primary focii are our patients, their safety, required interventions, medications, and getting them through the system optimally with us maintaining professional non-judgemental standards of care. (That means no patient abuse) which is often apparent in emergency staffs.

    Unfortunately, the hospital systems and their "mission statements" are anything but easy to deal with. The beancounters who essentially "make policy" really have very little reality orientation or clinical expertise.
    They crunch numbers and write up statements that look good to the public/BOD's/and regulatory watchdog associaltions like JCHO.

    The REALITY as RN's is that we are understaffed, frequently work with inadequate monitoring equipment, do not have the support of our administrators when we intervene appropriately for the patient and the intervention conflicts with "policy", are rarely supported by each other when administrators step into the arena (although we do support each other in private), are required to have vast stores of anatomical, physiological and medical knowledge, work long shifts often without breaks, are condencended to by physicians/surgeons, work weekends, holidays, rarely get requested days off or requested vacation time (because "of staffing"), have huge professional liability, and are usually scapegoated if a patient is harmed, are manipulated into feeling guilty and/or inadequate if we verbalize desent regarding policies/issues by the passive/aggressive nurse management style when the nm's state "there is no reason you can't do (whatever) everyone else does", we are hardly paid a scale commessrate to our skills/knowlege (in the south anyway), and are constantly exposed to diseases which can easily incapacitate ourselves and our families as well.

    I believe anyone who has stayed in this profession has every right to verbalize their frustrations, inasmuch as there are no sounding boards or outlets for us.

    When you are a professional nurse for 10 or 15 years, you might then make an empathetic and intelligent assessment as to what we are all about.

    It is NOT "a job".
  5. by   ilostu12
    here's how see it, nursing that is


    A new top because a pt with dementia spit out there medicine: $18

    A new pair of good nurses shoes, because of all the walking you do in 8/12 hour shift: $115

    The frustration of faullty equipment, long hours, lack of support from managers/supervisors and low pay, etc: the cost varies

    The one heart felt 'Thank you' from a pt you cared for (which may very well be few and far between): Absolutely and totaly price less!!


    Like other posters have said, nursing if not for everyone. But that one 'thank you' I may get, makes it ALL worth while......at least for me.

    Would I recommend nursing.........in a heart beat!!
  6. by   kharma09
    As the nurse to patient ratio and acuity level continue to increase (as seen in my own personal experience) I don't feel that the payscale is in proportion to potential liability (whether due to time constraint and an untimely short cut or simply a frivolous lawsuit which nearly everyone knows CAN happen and sometimes a flawed legal system allows to conclusion). As well, I wish that the health care system in general offered nurses better healthcare benefits as we are wearing out our bodies at a quicker rate than, in my own opinion, many other professional areas.

    I have to agree with some of the other nurses here when I say that I just don't know how I will be able to physically continue in this profession to retirement. I like the ideal of nursing being a calling and i'm impressed when I hear someone say that they want to become a nurse but sometimes I don't think it's the most logical of choices. My daughter is impressed by the money which I make (I don't work OT) but she says she will never consider nursing because she's seen the mental and physical toll which it can take. I would like to BE a nurse, but sometimes I just feel like i'm an educated assembly line worker.
  7. by   Otessa
    I would completely reccomend nursing. I have been in healthcare for 18 years and an RN for 14 of those.

    I have worked in a Nursing Home, Telemetry, CVICU, CCU, Float Pool, ICU and now as a Project Coordinator in administration. I am going back for my Masters Degree within the next year.

    How many other jobs would afford you these varied opportunities. I would have to agree that bedside nursing until I am 50 or 60 is NOT an option due to the toll on your body and long hours. I have made a great income with a flexible schedule-not many jobs would be quite like that.
  8. by   fuzzpuff
    I was at a clinical last night in L&D. The patient/ nurse ratio was 1:1. I was there for two days 6 hours each. I did not see any back breaking labor, I saw a lot of nurses sitting at the nurses station charting. Is this typical of L&D? Post Partum was even slower.
  9. by   nursemelani
    Quote from fuzzpuff
    I was at a clinical last night in L&D. The patient/ nurse ratio was 1:1. I was there for two days 6 hours each. I did not see any back breaking labor, I saw a lot of nurses sitting at the nurses station charting. Is this typical of L&D? Post Partum was even slower.
    I have not worked in L & D, but from what I have heard, there are slow days and busy days. As opposed to med-surg, where it is almost always hectic and stressful.
  10. by   sassyRN73
    I am a first year nursing student, and I have worked in a hospital as a secretary for six years and I have seen all of the B.S. nurses have to put up with on a daily basis. However I have had many other jobs in several different fields (computers, environmental laboratory, offices) and the same stuff happens there the mandatory overtime for salaried employees, the mandatory travel, the 70 hour workweek for a measly $12 per hour (an no ot for salaried personnel) the complete lack of support from management, and I am positive that there is no other place other than nursing that I want to be. I am well aware of the pitfalls and yet in the end I know that taking care of patients is my calling and my choice of profession. Change will hopefully come from within our profession so we can welcome new nurses to our ranks without hesitation.
    Peace and tranquillity to all the nurses out in the trenches!!!
  11. by   mtngrl
    Quote from nursemelani
    What is contract nursing?
    Well in my situation I don't work for an agency, I do work for the employer that I am employed at, but I only work a few hours a day, just to administer meds and maybe do some basic stuff. I pick from the hours they have available....I am not required to do any certain amount. The pay is high but there are no benefits and there is a lot of driving involved. Usually the work is 2-3 hours. I might do 1 or 2 of these a day. You are not guaranteed hours or even that you'll have a job next week. But it's paying the bills for now. Though I am always on the lookout for a permanent position somewhere. I never know how much money I am going to make with this job. It's a good second job, though. If I get a new job I would still like to pick up a few hours of the contract work.
  12. by   stambam
    I cant help but laugh at these negative posts on nursing. There is no other career where you can easily pick up and move to another state and still find a job in a week, Pay is great, overtime available, and you get to help people. Sureyou may have to work on weekends, at night or holidays but i would much rather do that then what i do now. here is my current job situation...Unrealistic sales goals, management pressure to hit numbers, constant travel-away from family, dealing with customers that dont give a damn about you, kissing butt just to get a deal, and when you cant sell(even though the quotas are unrealistic and you work your butt off, you may still get fired. and no pay unless you sell something. Nursing isn't bad compared to sales. And oh, if you all think that pharmaceutical sales is the greatest thing since sliced bread, its not. if the drug you sell isn't covered by the drug plan by that docotr, good luck getting him to prescribe it. and that job is not sales, its PR. nursing and any similar job is the way to go. yeah, cleaning up poop and other bodily fluids are gross, but i know that is n't a a constant hapening day to day. good luck!!!!
  13. by   kharma09
    Quote from stambam
    yeah, cleaning up poop and other bodily fluids are gross, but i know that is n't a a constant hapening day to day. good luck!!!!
    Hmmm, in many areas of nursing it is

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