High School Hopefull

  1. Ok, so I need some advice if at all possible.

    My ultimate plan in the big scheme of things is to become a CRNA.

    Im in my Junior year of high school now in New Jersey, and I figured I should start getting really focused and think about what I am going to do with my life.

    In my freshman and sophmore years, ill admit, I probably didnt do my best school work, but so far in Junior year im a straight A student. In my previous 2 years of high school id say my that my grades averaged up would be like a C+, B- or so.. this kind of scares me college wise. But like I said, so far, straight A's. Im also doing sports this year for extra curricular activites.

    Now im not quite sure if I should apply for a generic BSN program ( not sure of the competitiveness for colleges )

    or should I go to like a community college just so I can get my RN, then work a little and apply for a RN-BSN program ( <-- easier to get into?) then after working in an ICU for a year apply to a CRNA program ( again , im concerned with competitiveness and my grades in my first 2 years of high school )

    any advice?
    I guess to sum my situation up, if everything goes according to plan, if I get a good SAT score and a very good GPA my junior year, do you think I have a chance at my route to becoming a CRNA even though my grades werent that stellar in my first two years of high school?
    Last edit by essarache on Nov 10, '07
    •  
  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   gt4everpn
    hello!! glad to see some hs students here! i'm two years outta hs myself , a sophmore in college and i work as an lpn(practical nurse) anyway i say go for your rn-bsn!!, you, like myself are young and have 4 years of time to waste in a classroom lol!! ( i dont really mean waste, you know what i mean) i want to be a crna myself but first i want to be a ccrn for a while!! best of luck to you!!
  4. by   Tweety
    Good luck to you.

    Either plan sounds good. I would go ahead and apply to both, just to see what happens. They take other things besides grades into consideration.
  5. by   luvschoolnursing
    Don't know your situation, so can't give you defanate advice, but keep in mind that the community colleges generally offer very good nursing programs at much less cost and at least our local one transitions very nicely into a local 4 year program for BSN. (spoken from a mother of 2 high school kids who is going to be in college debt soon!!)
  6. by   essarache
    hi, thanks to everyone who replied. ive been doing some research and it looks like a lot of community colleges around my area have the 2 year degree. my main question is, say if I do exceptionally well in community college do you think I will have a problem transfering to a RN-BSN program? considering my first two years of high school grades?

    but again, my goal first off is to get into a 4 year college to get a bsn
    Last edit by essarache on Nov 11, '07
  7. by   Tweety
    RN to BSN programs are relatively easy to get into, especially if you choose one of the many online versions around the country.
  8. by   essarache
    Quote from Tweety
    RN to BSN programs are relatively easy to get into, especially if you choose one of the many online versions around the country.

    ok good to know, so if realistically I do really good in community college getting my RN, I wont have a problem entering a RN-BSN program ( even if its online )

    my only question to you is, for specialty school later on to get my masters to be a CRNA, would they frown upon taking an online course??
  9. by   Tweety
    Quote from essarache
    ok good to know, so if realistically I do really good in community college getting my RN, I wont have a problem entering a RN-BSN program ( even if its online )

    my only question to you is, for specialty school later on to get my masters to be a CRNA, would they frown upon taking an online course??
    No, as long as the program is from an accredited college, usually National League of Nursing.

    I'm a community college graduate and just got my BSN online. It doesn't say on my diploma "BSN (and he did it online)". The school I went to was NLN accredited which has rigorous standards that are acceptable for grad schools, so don't sweat that. I just got accepted to grad school myself.

    CRNA is a very competetive program to get into, few spots for lots of applicants (I guess the fact they make over 100,000 per year makes it attractive), so make sure you study hard and make as good as grades as possible from the get go and you should get in. Being involved in other activities, like school nursing assocations and community service looks good on the resume as well.

    Good luck. Please feel free to ask questions.

close