Can I be a nurse if I hate science?!

  1. I want a career where I can work in a hospital and help people. I thought of being a doctor, but I volunteered in a hospital and loved the nurses job more. I took all the requirements in highschool to potentially fulfill a nursing program, and hated every minute of it. I don't mind the material, it's just no matter how hard I study, I get low grades (65%). I took a different path in college, but I'm still thinking of what I'm missing in nursing. I recently looked at the courses students take in nursing programs, and was uninterested as soon as I seen Microbiology, chemistry..etc. What I'm asking is if the difficulty level of science is the same in nursing school? Should I switch from my program to an lpn program and work my way up to an RN? What do I do?!
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  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   Okami_CCRN
    Nurses are required to take college level chemistry, microbiology, anatomy & physiology I & II, as well as pathophysiology and nutrition.

    Beginning in an LPN program and transitioning to an RN program would still require you to fulfill the science requirement.

    Science is an inherent part of nursing, and a thorough knowledge of it will be of huge benefit to not only yourself, but your future patients if you chose to become a nurse.
  4. by   klone
    You're asking if college level science courses, such as what you would encounter in a nursing program, are as difficult as the ones you took in high school?

    As a general rule, college level courses are going to be much harder than high school level courses.

    If you hate science and do poorly in it, I would recommend finding another major than healthcare.
  5. by   imhorsemackerel
    You will have to work for that grade if you're going to school for LPN. Science is important to understand the body and the processes that go on especially when a client takes a particular medication or has a certain disease. You will find that A&P will be a lot of memorization, and nursing goes further requiring you to apply the concepts you learned. When I went to LPN school (it was a vocational school), I still had to take the school's A&P class even though I took 1 & 2 at a community college. Some of my friends who are going for RN school will have to take A&P 1 and 2, but for them a lot of the material will be familiar this second time around. We didn't go in depth with microbiology, but every school may be different. Either way, when you go for RN, they will require it. My school does not require chemistry, though.

    I guess if science really is your weak spot, then whatever school you go to, make sure you enroll in class where the professor is engaging with their students. Sites like ratemyprofessor can be helpful. Although, you should take them with a grain of salt. Some of my favorite professors were given low ratings. Also, due to their reputations for being good professors, their classes may fill up quickly. So I guess you just have to learn to appreciate science.
  6. by   Here.I.Stand
    I took A&P, Chem II (similar to AP chem as far as content), and Physics my senior year in HS. Yes, college level science classes are more rigorous than HS ones.

    Plus, many nursing programs have minimum passing scores of 78-82% -- contrary to the saying "C's get degrees," in nursing school C's are failing. Actually if your program requires 82%, a B- is failing.

    Nursing is so much more than handing out pills and bandages, or taking vitals at the clinic! (Actually, most clinics don't even have nurses working in pt care; MAs are cheaper.) You need a good working knowledge of A&P, pathophysiology, microbiology, and to a lesser extent, chemistry in order to understand what is happening with your pt, how to assess your pt, what complications to expect, how your interventions will affect the pt...

    What is it about nursing that appeals to you? Have you spoken to a career/academic advisor to explore other options that would have similar attributes?
  7. by   OrganizedChaos
    I would suggest a different career since science is deeply ingrained in nursing.
  8. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from shayjulia
    I want a career where I can work in a hospital and help people. I thought of being a doctor, but I volunteered in a hospital and loved the nurses job more. I took all the requirements in highschool to potentially fulfill a nursing program, and hated every minute of it. I don't mind the material, it's just no matter how hard I study, I get low grades (65%). I took a different path in college, but I'm still thinking of what I'm missing in nursing. I recently looked at the courses students take in nursing programs, and was uninterested as soon as I seen Microbiology, chemistry..etc. What I'm asking is if the difficulty level of science is the same in nursing school? Should I switch from my program to an lpn program and work my way up to an RN? What do I do?!
    I don't know how to say this more gently, so here goes:

    If you saw nurses working in the hospital and loved their job but you hate science, then I think you probably didn't see their job as clearly as you thought you did.

    What about other careers in healthcare? Your niche might be elsewhere. There are lots of options where you can help people in the hospital. Informatics, social work, child life, physical therapy, speech therapy, imaging technicians. I'm not saying that these are all entirely without science, but you might find them and/or their course work more enjoyable.
  9. by   Wolf at the Door
    NO. Find another avenue to explore and you will be happier.
  10. by   katyq82
    I had a tough time in science prior to taking my nursing prereqs, but looking back I see that it was more a fear than a dislike. I still find science tough but I enjoy it and it is easier now because I can relate it to the disease process. If you truly dislike science then I would have to agree with the previous posters that nursing isn't for you. But on a positive note, why don't you write down the things about your impression of nursing that appeal to you. Perhaps also elements of non-nursing careers that appeal to you. Then write down the things you know you are good at or feel you have an aptitude for. See what is similar on those two lists. Then look for career options where you will do those things/use those talents. Do you enjoy talking with people, connecting them with resources? Maybe social work. Do you find meaning in your religion? Maybe chaplaincy. Are you great at organizing details? Maybe you would be well suited for a medical office manager type of role. Or maybe something outside a medical setting. If you are still in college or just graduated, you should visit your college's career center for help determining what is a good fit for you. That is what they are there for. There are also lots of resources online. Good luck.
  11. by   IEDave
    It's also a common misconception that LPN/LVN training is "easier" than RN. It's somewhat faster (3 semesters vs. 4) and the emphasis is more narrowly focused (bedside vs. "whadda ya got") but it's no less rigorous. Having your bio down cold is important in nursing; hence, I have to side with the rest that you re-think this. As mentioned, there are other routes to take; I'd be thinking social work or medical billing/coding, but talking face to face with a career counselor would be your best bet.

    ----- Dave
  12. by   Froggybelly
    At some schools, the requirements to be accepted into an LPN program are considerably lower than an RN program, but that means you're competing with RN-ready students applying to both programs as a backup plan. At the school I attended, anything less than a 4.0 in the prerequisite courses (sciences and English) put the applicant onto the waitlist. Many of them filled LPN spots and transferred to RN programs later. 65% in your sciences wouldn't allow entry into any programs I've heard of, and in my large class (70+ people), those who made it in by the skin of their teeth failed out of the program. Nursing is a social science, but a lot of what you'll learn has to do with biology and chemistry. If you are not passing those courses, you will have an extremely difficult time in nursing school. I would seek out tutoring or consider another field that doesn't require so much scientific capability.
  13. by   Wannabenurseneko
    I'm not a Nurse yet but I'm currently working on my prerequisites ;You will have to study a lot of science , so you might want to think long on hard if you want to choose nursing as your career part .
  14. by   countrynurse09
    I don't know. That would sort of like being an accountant that doesn't like math. Nursing IS a science.

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