How do I quit brand new RN job to take better one?

  1. 0
    I got hired into my first RN job in June. It's really not at all what I envisioned myself to be doing long term...it's a small company and I'm not happy with the benefits. My dream job is the hospital I worked in as a tech...and it appears that that dream may soon come true. Question is, how do I graciously leave (or should I even consider leaving) current job with relatively lower pay and poor benefits, for another job that is much better for me? It's a huge organization, great benes, great people, more learning opportunities, etc. I know they would probably be greatly disappointed to lose me but, if I manage to get the job offer at the hospital there is just no way I can turn it down...but I don't want to burn any bridges either. Has any one else experienced this kind of situation and how did you handle it?
    Last edit by buttercup_rn on Sep 12, '12 : Reason: changed information

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  2. 11 Comments...

  3. 4
    If you receive a better offer, and you've weighed the pros and cons of both positions, then make sure you provide the required notice. However, make sure you have an offer in writing before you leave your current job. Also, the grass is not always greener on the other side, so you make find that your "dream job" isn't all you thought. Weigh your options carefully.
    Meriwhen, bisson, KelRN215, and 1 other like this.
  4. 1
    A decade ago I would have said you owe this company a duty to stay at least a year or two...

    But this is not the 90's or the '80 and since the turn of the century all the old rules are no longer.

    The reality of life is that if they need to get rid of you--you're gone. For the most part, though this company is small and could be an exception, there is zero employer to employee loyalty.

    Under the circumstances I'd suggest that you make 100% sure that you have the new job, and then give them reasonable notice and be honest about the why's.

    Consider the words: "low pay and poor benefits." 'Nuff said... It's a competative world and so be competative. Heck, if they are that disappointed they might simply offer you a significant increase in pay and alternative benefits and you just might decide to stay.
    Nola009 likes this.
  5. 0
    I left my first job after just two months. I simply said that I had a great opportunity that I just couldn't pass up. I appreciated the experience, and think it is a great facility. They were actually quite understanding. The DON gave me hugs multiple times before I left, which was quite akward. lol
  6. 0
    I am so happy I came across this post, as it is a possibility that if all goes well with my interview this week...I might just be offered a job and be in the same position.

    I am a recent new grad and have been working at my FIRST RN JOB for almost 2 months now...this current job is not horrible and I do enjoy it on some levels but I have an interview with the hospital I've been wanting to work in with the unit I have also wanted to work in before I even started college!

    Please let me know how it goes for you! Good luck.
  7. 3
    Many nurses have dealt with this situation by remaining at the first job as PRN. You've already been trained to do the work and they may be glad to have you just pick up a couple shifts per month. Staying PRN also keeps your foot in the door in case the other job isn't what you thought.
    peabozzle, Nola009, and CP2013 like this.
  8. 0
    I am in the same predicament. I am actually working my 2nd job (worked the first job for a year in a place I sort of settled for due to extenuating circumstances, but ended up liking pretty well because of the atmosphere, teamwork, people, etc). I started Oct 1, but have basically been miserable here. I am talking to a recruiter at another facility and strongly considering beginning the app process there.

    My main concern is this: should I tell my manager before I start to apply in case managers of the positions I'm applying for decide they want to contact my manager? What is the likelihood of that occurring??

    I feel like talking to my manager and just letting her know I'm looking to find a position that is a better fit for me might be the professional thing to do, but there's always that concern that the manager might feel some discontentment towards me for leaving so soon...
  9. 0
    I received a job offer at a hospital and it starts in a few weeks. However, I am talking to a recruiter at the hospital of my dreams and she said I may be offered a position in the fall. Is it wrong for me to take the job position offered to me and to leave in the fall if I get offered a position at the hospital I've been wanting to work for?
  10. 2
    I wouldn't say anything to anybody until I had a firm offer from the dream hospital. The medical world is a small community, once u have burned a bridge at one place, word travels fast! I wouldn't quit my current job or mention to my manager that I was even looking for another job until I had the other one...then, work your notice and bow out gracefully. I am also a new grad that is looking for my first nursing job (took NCLEX yesterday w/ good pvt), but I am "well seasoned" with work experience. I have found that u do not want to burn a bridge with an employer because u never know when u might have to utilize them again for a reference etc... I was told by my advisor that a new grad should stay on first job for 1 year, but if this dream job is going to be truly a great thing then go for it! Keep in mind though the grass isn't always greener on the other side of the fence, it's greener where u water it, and take care of it....I took a "dream job" once....it was a dream alright, appearances on the outside didn't reflect the inside...it was a nightmare..I learned from it and moved on Good luck to you OP!
    bloodorange and bluegreen26 like this.
  11. 2
    Dream jobs often can turn into nightmares. Myself included. But aside from that, definitely don't burn bridges as you will need manager references in the future. However I don;t think it's burning bridges if you sincerely explain to your manager the reason for leaving for a better offer. You definitely deserve what you want. And you're allowed to leave, given teh proper notice
    bluegreen26 and ICUman like this.


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