Chronic Tardiness - page 5

We waiting for a nurse to float from another floor this morning because we had two call ins. She was 25 minutes late. We bowed down at her feet "oh thank goodness you're here". She's 'sorry I'm... Read More

  1. by   purplemania
    I think people who are chronically late are attention getters. My SIL is late to everything and, after interrupting whatever is taking place, spends several minutes explaining her behavior. All eyes on her---------
  2. by   mattsmom81
    PRN, the hospital was foolish not to run with this incident as a PR booster for your hospital and its nurses. These are the kinds of stories the public needs to hear about nurses, IMO. Good job!
  3. by   puggy
    At our facility we start report on time regardless if everyone is there or not. Those that are tardy have to get report from the unit manager and on night shift from the house supervisor. These incidents are written up and placed in the nurses file. We have very few late nurses.
  4. by   kimmicoobug
    I live all of four minutes away from my job. I leave 15 minutes before my shift starts and then have 10 minutes to write down meds, highlight pertinent information on the cardex. That sorta stuff.
  5. by   atownsendrn
    Hate tardiness. We have one particular nurse on nights that has a very hard time getting to work. It has always been a joke with the staff. But in my new position I feel like it needs to be addressed. I discussed it with her during her evaluation - and she has been doing much better. She hasn't been late in three weeks. Then yesterday - she didn't realize that I was doing patient care for someone that needed to leave at 5:30 - she called at 6:15 saying that she had just got out of the shower and needed to get something to eat before she came in. Needless to say she was shocked when she walked in with her hair wet, a bag full of take-out food, and 10 minutes late and there I was. Unfortunately there is no disciplinary action that I can take until she is late 2 times in a pay period. But you better believe I will be checking her time very carefully from now on.
  6. by   TreceRN
    It doesn't seem to be a problem in my hospital. Our facility DOES discipline chronic tardiness. We keep track of those that come in late on our database, but the biggest problem with that is that the charge nurse has to call our staffing office and tell them that "so and so was late" and they often don't want to do that 'cause they feel like they're tattling. If someone has more than three "tardies" in 6 months, they start up the employee counseling road and can be terminated. I don't know of anyone that has actually been terminated. If they start down the formal discipline road, they either get it together or they quit. We HAVE to treat everyone the same as managers; not only is that the fair and honest thing to do, but if you don't the person being disciplined can "grieve" the counseling and have it overturned by HR. It is also considered a "terminatable" offense to falsify your timecard, and we have fired people who've come in 1/2 late and wrote on their timecard that they were on time.
  7. by   Heartsofangels
    I am always a 1/2 hour early for my shift. By the time I get report and do narcotic count it's 3pm and I can get started right away. There is this one nurse who is always late. She was always driving in at ten past. And of course they won't do anything because we are short of nurses, and this nurse only does the bare necessities, nothing more. One night I was sick of her being late again, so when she walked in I looked at her and said "late again." Of course she made something up, but she's been on time ever since!
  8. by   bamagirl
    We have a policy at the hospital where I work. We have to clock in on a time clock so if someone is late it is recorded. We have a nurse who is chronically late. We have up to 10 min past time for our shift to start to clock in. This nurse is always clocking in up to 10 min late. Then she is still late getting to the unit to start work. The behavior is tolerated by management because she "clocks in on time." I think "Tolerance" has gone too far.
    Originally posted by 3rdShiftGuy
    We waiting for a nurse to float from another floor this morning because we had two call ins. She was 25 minutes late. We bowed down at her feet "oh thank goodness you're here". She's 'sorry I'm late'. Earlier I had called her floor where they said "she's always late".

    Have we created due to the nursing shortage an environment where tardiness is tolerated because we are greatful they even show up? Seem so at this hospital that tardiness is tolerated. The people don't even seem to have an excuse or care, they just want the hours to be 7:15 instead of 6:45. Of course they usually are the ones chomping at the bits to go home on time.

    So the question is, what is your policy on tardiness. Is it enforced. Have we created a culture of mediocrity in nursing because of the "shortage"?
  9. by   EarthAngel
    Over the years I have lived extensively overseas. Different cultures ahve different views on timeliness VS. tardiness. I wonder, how many of the chronically late nurses are ones from these types of cultures? Also, I wonder if it has anything to do with the shift the person is on. Does changing shifts help? Maybe they arent morning/day/night people?
    Just something that came to mind, as I am a person that can be on the dot for ANYTHING after 9 am. Before that, its the luck of the draw!!:imbar
  10. by   ktwlpn
    Originally posted by EarthAngel
    Over the years I have lived extensively overseas. Different cultures ahve different views on timeliness VS. tardiness. I wonder, how many of the chronically late nurses are ones from these types of cultures? Also, I wonder if it has anything to do with the shift the person is on. Does changing shifts help? Maybe they arent morning/day/night people?
    Just something that came to mind, as I am a person that can be on the dot for ANYTHING after 9 am. Before that, its the luck of the draw!!:imbar
    All of my co-workers-both the late and the prompt are natural born american citizens.I don't think that is a valid excuse anyway.I am not a morning person but have worked day shift for over 10 yrs now-and I am routinely on time because I make the effort to do so.....Should I be excused and permitted to stroll in after 9am because I am not a morning person?
  11. by   EarthAngel
    I am not yet working as a nurse, I graduate August 2003 from an LVN program and am looking forward to joining the forces. I didnt say it was an excuse, it was just a curiousity.
  12. by   cokie
    i agree, i think that people are late for the things that they CAN be late for. i wonder if these same nurses were late for the interview that got them hired. my friend who is spanish tries to use her culture as an excuse for being late to things she and i do together. i have never seen her late for work, and i tell her so. one time we were going to carpool somewhere, and i left without her (she was late), we passed on the road up to my house, she parked her car on the street (not at my house), and we left from there. she is no longer late to things with me.................
  13. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Originally posted by nialloh
    My brother was also an RN in the hospital I work in. He found the perfect solution for the social butterflies who are on time but like to chat for 15 - 30 minutes before getting report. He would sit in front of an empty chair and give it a full report, and it was the other nurses job to make sure she was in it. (he told them all in advance he was going to do it). He only had to do it once. If he sits in front of a chair, the other nurse comes running over.
    Worked for him

    :roll THERE YA GO!!! :roll

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