New RN - Should I take an unappealing Med-Surg offer? - page 2

Dear Nurse Beth, I am a recently-licensed RN looking for some career advice and guidance. This summer, after graduating nursing school, I have been working at an outdoor education summer camp as a... Read More

  1. by   Nurse Beth
    Quote from RNNPICU
    I would take the wound care. If you are not keen on med-surg, you could really be miserable. Take a look at the multitude of threads on people who are not happy in their jobs. Also, the hospital may want you for 1-2 years, ideally more. Do you really want Med-surg for that long if it is not something you are interested in? The wound care job sounds really interesting. make clear to them you are a new grad and would need a REAL orientation, not just 1-2 weeks. it sounds like it would be a good match, plus coupled with the environmental job.
    Good Luck
    Remember a residency provides the new grad transitional support for months and often up to one year in an acute care setting. This vs working part-time without benefits in a narrow field. It is easier to go from broad to narrow than from narrow to broad when you are job seeking.
  2. by   Tiftoez76
    Dear OP: where did you do your Preceptorship? I'm currently in the middle of mine and can tell you I do NOT want to work Med-Surg for a month much less a year. I went back to school to finally finish my nursing degree and fulfill a lifelong desire to help people. Not just pass meds, but help the whole person! I'm not sure where I will land my first job, but my advice to you is to follow your heart. I know from previous experience that working a job that you are unhappy it is harmful to your health, your spirit and your happiness!
  3. by   FlorinRN
    Hi Sarah, congrats on getting offers! Hospital and Med-Surg is the way to go, despite being difficult to move away. That pathway would open your career choices: think BIG. While wound care is very interesting (I worked in a nursing home, so have seen enough of them), it narrows down your choices, at this point in your nursing career. Best of luck!
  4. by   beekee
    Nursing is such a broad field. In the course of a 40 year career, you will likely practice in a wide variety of specialties. It's possible, but probably unlikely, you will not want (or possibly be able) to do wound care for 30, 40+ years. I'm an older, second career nurse, and I knew pretty quickly that I would not want to do bedside care for 10, 20+ years. I started to look at job postings. For the jobs that got me interested, I looked to see what the preferred qualifications were. So, I'm in the dreaded med-surg position. Is it hard as hell? Yup. But, I consider it a step to my ultimate goal.

    However, I am not you, so your career goals are different from mine. Good luck with your decision.
  5. by   SHGR
    Quote from Nurse Beth
    Remember a residency provides the new grad transitional support for months and often up to one year in an acute care setting. This vs working part-time without benefits in a narrow field. It is easier to go from broad to narrow than from narrow to broad when you are job seeking.
    One thing to consider is what the "residency" is actually comprised of and what it actually offers. One hospital here has a seminar once a month or so and calls it a residency. It's not very supportive. Get more details, talk to the residency coordinator, talk to some of the new grads in the program before you base your decision on this.
  6. by   Lil Nel
    So true. The large teaching hospital that I worked at for three months had a Residency Program for new nurses. It was indeed a once a month seminar. The residency coordinator was lovely, but overall, I didn't see how helpful the program was for new nurses. But it is a nice label for the hospital to hang out to entice new employees.
  7. by   twinmommy+2
    While job satisfaction is important, you will learn so much during a new RN residency I would say take door #2. If it is wound care you are wanting to specialize in you will get a lot of wound care in Med/surg. And its a great thing to have on a resume if you ever want to move to another area of nursing, much better than a per diem job.
  8. by   Whull1
    Don't take the residency. You will be miserable the entire time you're there because your heart is not in it.

    As for the "year of general RN experience," that rule doesn't apply anymore. As a new Grad, I went straight into the NICU because that's what I love! I then went to General ED to give it a try and am now back in NICU. LOVED ED, hated adults. During my time in NICU, I was able to cross train in General Pediatrics and Newborn Nursery!

    I branched out because I wanted to make sure NICU was for me before I go back to Grad school. I am happy to say I have submitted my applications and am playing the waiting game!

    good luck to you! Remember do what's right for you!
  9. by   LollygaggerRN
    Really, Nurse Beth, a "death sentence"? Dramatic much?

    I was an older new grad five years ago. MedSurg is not for me. It would never be for me. I can't even imagine doing it for a day. Just not my thing.

    Five years ago as a new grad I took three PT jobs in three different cities in two different states to avoid the hospital. Fast forward to now and I am working in an outpatient procedure clinic...no nights, weekends or holidays and making $46 per hour. If that is a "death sentence" I'll take it.

    I know this post is old, but I hope the OP took the position that will make her happy and satisfied!!
  10. by   Nurse Beth
    Quote from LollygaggerRN
    Really, Nurse Beth, a "death sentence"? Dramatic much?

    I was an older new grad five years ago. MedSurg is not for me. It would never be for me. I can't even imagine doing it for a day. Just not my thing.

    Five years ago as a new grad I took three PT jobs in three different cities in two different states to avoid the hospital. Fast forward to now and I am working in an outpatient procedure clinic...no nights, weekends or holidays and making $46 per hour. If that is a "death sentence" I'll take it.

    I know this post is old, but I hope the OP took the position that will make her happy and satisfied!!
    lol I am so guilty as charged! Of hyperbole. You nailed me, because in real life, yes, I am dramatic and passionate.

    However, it would be a nail in the coffin of being a career counselor (oops I did it again) to advise new grads to start out working part-time and/or per diem. Your example non-withstanding, it takes at least a year of full-time work to achieve competency.

    For some new nurses working 12 hour shifts, even 3-5 days off in between shifts is too long while acquiring new skills.

    Thanks for sharing and glad it worked out like it did for you

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