I'm supposed to wear an "Ask me if I washed my hands!" button?! - page 18

Today, administrators launched a handwashing campaign, part of which includes having patient care staff wear giant buttons that say, "Ask me if I washed my hands!" Patients are encouraged to ask... Read More

  1. by   UM Review RN
    Perhaps I have a unique preception because I have experience as a nurse, an administrative assistant and a patient. And I could relate some hair raising incidents I have observed as a patient.

    I've noticed that you have a "unique perception" with nearly every thread you participate in.

    I'll bet you walked 50 miles to nursing school one way, too, right?

    Yer a Pot-Stirrer, Granny, yessiree.
  2. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Perhaps I have a unique preception because I have experience as a nurse, an administrative assistant and a patient. And I could relate some hair raising incidents I have observed as a patient.
    Others might as well, only they don't feel the need to state it. That also doesn't mean that the automatically will have the right solution for everything, including this particular subject.

    (done here)
  3. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    I've noticed that you have a "unique perception" with nearly every thread you participate in.

    I'll bet you walked 50 miles to nursing school one way, too, right?

    Yer a Pot-Stirrer, Granny, yessiree.

    Actually, I drove 30 miles to my college:chuckle Then 25 miles to AMC where I worked I am not a pot stirrer, I just love a spirited rational discussion

    Grannynurse
  4. by   daisybaby
    Come, now. Once again, a thread that began as an intelligent and respectful discussion has begun to evolve (or perhaps, digress) into an unpleasant series of off-topic tangents that appear to serve no purpose.

    My intent was to give an example of how far removed from the trenches management has gotten (or has always been?), and what a gaping hole exists between the mindsets of administration and those providing patient care. While the entire hospital's goal is improving the quality patient care, clearly we are not on the same page regarding how we should go about improving it. As a team.

    Timothy, you seem to understand exactly the point I've attempted to make, and thank you for illustrating it so eloquently. Others kept this post productive by sharing infection control strategies that include the entire health care team as opposed to singling out nurses. Light-hearted comments along the way helped to release a little frustration at the fact that sometimes we feel like administration just doesn't understand. That's the spirit in which my original post was intended. Angie, Marie, you seem to know exactly where I'm coming from. I think most of you do.

    So please, no more sidebars of who's going to sue whom, nobody cares about the darn button, quit whining, etc. etc. There's no need to perpetuate this thread by drifting from the original topic in order to get the last word in. Clearly, no one's mind is going to be changed here.

    This is now FAR from a rational discussion. Seems more like being contrary for the sake of being so. I implore you, if there's nothing left to say that's productive and relevant, just let it go.
    Last edit by daisybaby on Oct 26, '05
  5. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from daisybaby
    Come, now. Once again, a thread that began as an intelligent and respectful discussion has begun to evolve (or perhaps, digress) into an unpleasant series of off-topic tangents that appear to serve no purpose.

    My intent was to give an example of how far removed from the trenches management has gotten (or has always been?), and what a gaping hole exists between the mindsets of administration and those providing patient care. While the entire hospital's goal is improving the quality patient care, clearly we are not on the same page regarding how we should go about improving it. As a team.

    Timothy, you seem to understand exactly the point I've attempted to make, and thank you for illustrating it so eloquently. Others kept this post productive by sharing infection control strategies that include the entire health care team as opposed to singling out nurses. Light-hearted comments along the way helped to release a little frustration at the fact that sometimes we feel like administration just doesn't understand. That's the spirit in which my original post was intended. Angie, Marie, you seem to know exactly where I'm coming from. I think most of you do.

    So please, no more sidebars of who's going to sue whom, nobody cares about the darn button, quit whining, etc. etc. There's no need to perpetuate this thread by drifting from the original topic in order to get the last word in. Clearly, no one's mind is going to be changed here.

    This is now FAR from a rational discussion. Seems more like being contrary for the sake of being so. I implore you, if there's nothing left to say that's productive and relevant, just let it go.

    I'm sorry, I have gotten the wrong impression of this board. I though it was a public message board and as long as one did not violate TOS, one could post what one wishs. I guess I was wrong.

    Grannynurse
  6. by   maikranz
    "Can't we all just get alooooooooooooooong......" :icon_hug:
    Sorry, I have seen the buttons and think they're silly. Almost like
    the campaign we had here about mosquitos and West Nile; no way was I carrying around a flyswatter!
  7. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from maikranz
    "Can't we all just get alooooooooooooooong......" :icon_hug:
    Sorry, I have seen the buttons and think they're silly. Almost like
    the campaign we had here about mosquitos and West Nile; no way was I carrying around a flyswatter!
    Were the flyswatters just symbolic, or could you use them on people that asked assinine questions about them?

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  8. by   caroladybelle
    So I went to work on Friday, and there was a bag of buttons on the counter....about washing hands. The Nursing staff asked if we could make the Attendings wear them.

    At the staff meeting, our manager (a really nice woman) told us about wearing the buttons, and that they were going to do a study on usage of soap/hand sanitizer on our floor.

    Three questions asked (beyond forcing MDs to wear them):

    Do we really think that Housekeeping has the patience to keep accurate records and not borrow supplies from other floors?

    Is any nurse ever going to say "No" when asked if s/he washed her hands?

    And I, ever the smart aleck, asked what would happen if we all just used two/three times as much soap each time we washed our hands?
  9. by   scampi710
    Quote from grannynurse FNP student
    Actually, I drove 30 miles to my college:chuckle Then 25 miles to AMC where I worked I am not a pot stirrer, I just love a spirited rational discussion

    Grannynurse
    :1luvu: A nurse after my own heart! :wink2:
  10. by   ZASHAGALKA
    On top of, I think, doing a good job of handwashing, I have taken to squirting several ounces of soap/alcohol based cleaners around my area down the drain each shift.

    If that's the standard I'm going to be judged on, then I'll be the number one nurse in the hospital (who cares if it's actually true or not - it's all about being within or to the left of first standard deviation on some report, right?)

    Just call me the curve buster. I use more soap then even the infection control nurses, ergo, my hands are always clean, even when they're not.

    and the sign says . . . .

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  11. by   mstigerlily
    I like you.

    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    On top of, I think, doing a good job of handwashing, I have taken to squirting several ounces of soap/alcohol based cleaners around my area down the drain each shift.

    If that's the standard I'm going to be judged on, then I'll be the number one nurse in the hospital (who cares if it's actually true or not - it's all about being within or to the left of first standard deviation on some report, right?)

    Just call me the curve buster. I use more soap then even the infection control nurses, ergo, my hands are always clean, even when they're not.

    and the sign says . . . .

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  12. by   ZASHAGALKA
    And the sign says . . . nurses caught not washing their hands will be shot on sight.

    So I wasted the soap and whined to admin: 'Hey what gives you the right!!? To put out a badge to put me down to or to keep me in my place . . . .'

    signs signs everywhere signs, blocking up the scenery, breaking my mind . . .

    "and the sign says, you got to wash your hands to go inside"

    Ugh!

    "well thank you admin for thinking about me, but I'm alive and doing fine. . . "


    So i threw down that badge and said "Imagine that! Me, working for you!"

    And the sign says . . .

    DO THIS, DON'T DO THAT, CAN'T YOU READ THE SIGN?!?

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Last edit by ZASHAGALKA on Oct 29, '05
  13. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from scampi710
    :1luvu: A nurse after my own heart! :wink2:
    And in January, I will be driving 110 miles, one way, to go to grad school. Just think, I'll have a whole two hours to sing those golden oldies from the 60s, off key and at the top of my lungs.:Melody:

    Grannynurse

    Het maybe I can do a research study on the number of nurses who really do not wash their hands

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