Australian NCLEX pass rates? - page 2

by ccampbell66

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HI! I am an US citizen seriously considering getting my BSN in Australia. Does anyone have any idea of the NCLEX pass rates for Australian students? Does anyone know if Australian BSN programs are similar to those in the US?... Read More


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    Quote from ccampbell66
    HI! I am an US citizen seriously considering getting my BSN in Australia. Does anyone have any idea of the NCLEX pass rates for Australian students? Does anyone know if Australian BSN programs are similar to those in the US? Does anyone know about how difficult it is to come back from Australia and get licensed in a particular state?

    Thanks!
    Carter
    G'day Carter,

    The issue with many Australian nursing programs is the deficiency in Maternity Nursing, which may preclude you from immediately registering with your State's Board of Nursing. This is because Maternity Nursing in Australia has been roped under Midwifery.

    For the many American nursing students (ex-classmates), their pathways were:

    - returning home and enrolling in a unit of Maternity nursing
    - extending their student visa for another 12 months to pursue Maternity Nursing as post-grad studies.

    Mental Health and Pediatrics are either fashioned into the course or offered as electives.

    Best of Luck
    Silverdragon102 likes this.
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    I would say that the reason the NCLEX pass rates are so low for foreign educated nurses is that in the US, the entire nursing degree is geared at passing it, with exams etc having NCLEX style questions. Obviously this is not the case in Australia. We have no standardised nursing exam, passing our university degree is enough to meet the requirements for being registered. Also, in Australia, we do not do OB units as that comes under midwifery, which requires a further year of study. Medications and scope of practice etc are different such as having nurse initiated medications. We do not have CNAs or respiratory therapists, those duties come under our job descriptions. I wouldn't advise doing a nursing degree in Aus if you want to practice nursing in the US. Very different system, lots of hoops to jump through.
    elkpark likes this.
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    Joeldew,

    Thanks for your input. I have been accepted to the nursing program at QUT. I'm trying to decide whether or not to go. If I go I would graduate 10 months earlier than if I stay in the US. The downside is I assume I would have to take some bridge classes in order to be able to pass the NCLEX. Time wise then it may work out to be the same. I just don't know what to do. It would be so helpful to talk to someone who is from the US that studied in Australia, or if not that, then an Australian nurse who came to the US to work. If you have any advise or a contact for me please let me know. Thanks! Carter
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    Thanks for your input suga_junkie.
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    I am an American currently living in the US. I have been accepted to the nursing program at QUT in Brisbane. from the research i have gathered, it appears that QUT is a highly regarded University. I'm trying to decide whether or not to go. If I go I would graduate 10 months earlier than if I stay in the US. The downside is I assume I would have to take some bridge classes in order to be able to pass the NCLEX if I came back to the States. Time wise then it may work out to be the same. I just don't know what to do. It would be so helpful to talk to someone who is from the US that studied in Australia, or if not that, then an Australian nurse who came to the US to work. If you have any advise or a contact for me please let me know. Thanks! Carter
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    The simple answer is to obtain your nursing degree in the country that you wish to practice. If you train overseas you will ALWAYS be considered an internationally educated nurse. Remember, the training overseas does not prepare you to practice as a nurse in the US. The medications are different, the scope of practice is different, the units of measurement is different, the treatment protocols are different not to mention the cultural differences.

    That said, it is possible to be successful training overseas and returning to the US but most facilities have an abundance of locally trained new graduate nurses waiting to be hired and being an IEN even as a US citizen can be a barrier.
    elkpark likes this.
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    Duplicate threads merged......

    OP The problem with getting an education overseas is that you will have trouble getting your licinse and take NCLEX here in the US. Specfic to Australia as has been already mentioned in this thread will be the lack of maternity nursing......which is included in the US education. Since you will be missing a chunk of your education by US standards you will have difficulty finding a state to endorse you education to allow you to sit for NCLEX. You have difficulty getting a straight answer because the requirements vary state to state and are looked at on an individual case by case basis.

    YOU already have a bachelors degree have you looked into ABSN (accelerated BSN nursing programs) or direct entry Masters here in the US?
  8. 1
    Quote from Esme12
    OP The problem with getting an education overseas is that you will have trouble getting your licinse and take NCLEX here in the US. Specfic to Australia as has been already mentioned in this thread will be the lack of maternity nursing......which is included in the US education. Since you will be missing a chunk of your education by US standards you will have difficulty finding a state to endorse you education to allow you to sit for NCLEX. You have difficulty getting a straight answer because the requirements vary state to state and are looked at on an individual case by case basis.
    Also, as someone already mentioned in passing but didn't really explain, if you are educated somewhere else in the world, you will always be considered an internationally education RN in the US for the rest of your career, and will have extra requirements and "hoops to jump through" at initial licensure and any time you want to apply for licensure in another state, for the rest of your career. Being a US citizen has nothing to do with it -- the issue is where you were educated.
    Esme12 likes this.
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    justbeachynurse and esme12, thank you for your input. Esme12, yes I have looked into accelerated programs, etc. What I find very frustrating in the US is that there are not standardized entry requirements. Every school I look into seems to have a slight twist on what their prerequisites are. I have been focused on the prereqs for a local university. If I want to apply to other programs, then their always seem to be other classes required. Then there are some programs that will not except some of my classes that are over 7 yrs old. It has just been a frustrating process. I will finish my prereqs for the local university after the first summer session, but because of when they will completed I can not start the program (assuming I get accepted) until the January intake. The Australian program starts in July. The nice thing about how Australia's nursing programs are structured is that they build the prereqs into the programs. I would get out approximately 9-10 months earlier from Australia. Granted I would have to probably take some bridge programs, but I would have had a learning experience of studying abroad. I just don't know what ultimately is the better way to go taking everything into account.
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    Elkpark, you make a valid point.


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