Is your colleague a mind reader? Or just plain lazy - page 2

by madwife2002 7,248 Views | 21 Comments Senior Moderator

Everybody around me at work reacts to situations by becoming angry, retaliatory, vindictive and mean. Nobody I work with and I mean nobody I work with looks at the whole picture with their work colleague they automatically... Read More


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    Quote from jtwilburt
    You should help because it's not about how you work or how they work, it's about moving your patient forward on the timeline to recovery. Your patient is whoever you are able to help while you are working, not necessarily just who you are assigned to. Nurses are still the most trusted professionals ... the "not my patient, not my job" undermines that trust. Recognize the need for help, help the other nurse for the sake of the patient and then, after the work is done pull the other nurse aside and help them get better so their won't be a next time.
    After doing this job for 27 years, you sill learn things are really diiferent than you originally thought....
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    No matter what the problem is, nurses should help each other unless you feel you're being taken advantage of.
    Last edit by nurse4sale on Jan 20, '13
    Ir15hd4nc3r_RN likes this.
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    Fear! From my experience, asking for help is usually time consuming in itself. Finding someone that is not as busy as you is usually the case. I was accused by a nursing assistant that I was dumping when I asked him to do something for me once. He was a gossip and trouble maker. I would find him talking in rooms with another employee far from his post. I use to ask myself how could a staff member such as this possibly think I was dumping when I had no break. I would find my patients personal needs not met and do them myself. After calculating the time a patient sits in their own feces, the time it takes to get assistance, and the time difference when I waited, I saw no hope. Many of these problems can be solved with proper management. Someone has to take the bull by the horn. Nurses on the floor have no time for such nonsense. A good supervisor will address it in meetings and get out on the floor and observe. A little team work would help too. Set an example!

    People that are complaining constantly? Your solution is you. As a manger, you should know the pace of your unit and its challenges. Facilitating a teamwork atmosphere and try facilitating an atmosphere of compassion for each of your employees for each other. This is a key role of all nurses. Without it, our care is cold and the attitude of the unit rubs off on the patients.
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    I love the nurses who complete all their work on four easy walkie talkies while laughing/comaining at the nurses who cant handle their own assignment of 4bed ridden complete care trachs and pegs and q30 orders if some sort. yes this has happened often
    Ir15hd4nc3r_RN and sistasoul like this.
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    I think it is really sad that many medical professionals do not believe in teamwork and have a "fend for yourself" attitude. I wonder how you treat your patients!
    Ir15hd4nc3r_RN and anotherone like this.
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    I have been working for about 18 months, and I have never gone running to mommy about colleagues or anything for that matter. Your employees need to grow the **** up.

    Also, I've never been a nurse manager, so take this with a grain of salt or contemplate it. Your choice. If this happens often, maybe some root-cause analysis about the culture of the unit needs to be done. Because you are the leader, some changes can start with how you handle the complainers and what you do with the results of your root-cause analysis.
    anotherone and nurse4sale like this.
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    Quote from nurseladybug12
    I think it is really sad that many medical professionals do not believe in teamwork and have a "fend for yourself" attitude. I wonder how you treat your patients!
    It is a shame, nurseladybug12, but it's not like that in every profession. Take the doctors for instance. Not only do they have each others backs, you never hear them talk bad about one another like the nurses do. Some nurses just never grew-up past grade school.
    anotherone and NutmeggeRN like this.
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    Quote from dudette10
    I have been working for about 18 months, and I have never gone running to mommy about colleagues or anything for that matter. Your employees need to grow the **** up.

    Also, I've never been a nurse manager, so take this with a grain of salt or contemplate it. Your choice. If this happens often, maybe some root-cause analysis about the culture of the unit needs to be done. Because you are the leader, some changes can start with how you handle the complainers and what you do with the results of your root-cause analysis.
    What you say is very true, except where I work it has been a slow process of 2 steps forward 1 step back.
    In the past couple of years we have made great strides if I look back at the whole picture. We are just not where we need to be yet.
    If I could just focus on the culture it would be great, but there is a much larger picture outside the man management aspect.
    I encourage each member of staff to look at themselves and decide what they can do to make a change because you can only change your own behaviors.
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    If you are getting daily complaints on nurses by nurses, then this is an issue that needs to be addressed in a staff meeting with all present. And as a manager whos job, in part, is to foster a better team--bring it to them. Include the CNA's in this as well, and the clerks. "what can you do, what will you do, I expect that you do" What ideas do they have? Are the assignments evenly divided? Would it be feasible to have partners--2 nurses who help each other, spot for breaks, lunch breaks that type of thing? Have you worked your floor? If you have not, then this is another way to look at how the floor runs itself, and a better understanding of where things go awry. Include CNA's in group report. Everyone has a game plan. You could round and be present and sure that all are doing what they need to for patient safety and care. If you have a charge nurse (especially one who doesn't take an assignment) what can that person do to help if your partners are both busy with a patient? Once everyone is on the same page of the needs of the floor, and it can vary day to day, patient to patient, perhaps it is then easier to say "what can I do for you right now, I have a few minutes". When everything becomes a critical emergency all at once, then is when stress becomes overwhelming. Your charge nurses need to be pro-active. With all due respect, you need to be pro-active. Make assignments according to strengths, partnerships that compliment each other, and if you are an IV expert, rapid response proficient, or have a keen eye on subtle changes in condition, be part of your team. Often people will bring things to managers that they don't feel the managers are well informed on. Be present, be absolutely clear on chain of command, what to do if you are in the weeds, and who your go to people are. If the employees are empowered to problem solve independently, then they most often are more willing to do so.
    Ir15hd4nc3r_RN and SCSTxRN like this.
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    Sometimes peopel assume that you know what their thinking , which is not the case all the time. Hopefully we can make them understand that they need to speak up to be heard.


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