Young, Thin, and Cute New Hires - page 6

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

51,653 Views | 295 Comments

My workplace, a freestanding specialty hospital owned by a for-profit corporation that operates multiple facilities across the United States, has been having recent troubles with low Press Ganey patient satisfaction scores. This... Read More


  1. 7
    With all due respect ... this thread, and its placement on the home page ... contributes what, exactly? Does it promote professionalism, camaraderie within the nursing community, or a positive image to first-time visitors to the site?

    Oy.
    EllieBean13, KimberlyRN89, Luckyyou, and 4 others like this.
  2. 7
    I am so sick of thin, pretty nurses being slammed. Sorry.... I am 53 yo, thin, and have been called pretty. Ppl need to stop making appearance an issue. I do not apologize for my looks and I don't see why it is even mentioned in this article. BTW, I work super hard to deliver great nursing care, and to stay healthy.
  3. 1
    in reply to a post with pic of stewardess: I used to be a flight attendant lol ;D
    SummitRN likes this.
  4. 6
    Quote from Altra
    With all due respect ... this thread, and its placement on the home page ... contributes what, exactly? Does it promote professionalism, camaraderie within the nursing community, or a positive image to first-time visitors to the site?

    Oy.
    It contributes a topic that generates discussion. And, after more than 50 responses by multiple members, it seems that many people have their opinions on this issue.

    There are masses of other threads that discuss 'unsavory' topics: addicted nurses, overweight nurses, body odor, cheating, etc. I feel they all have their place on these forums.
    LadyFree28, imintrouble, prnqday, and 3 others like this.
  5. 1
    Quote from mc3
    Yes, but who is the 24 year old going to learn from, when the 50 year old isn't there? Another 24 yr old???

    just saying...........

    mc3
    If another 24 year old knows how to make the pizza, why not?

    So much of nursing has been learn by experience, trial by fire, sink or swim anyway.

    Frequently I've seen new nurses oriented by someone with 6 months or a year experience even when an "older" nurse has been available.
    anotherone likes this.
  6. 2
    While I understand that basics of what you are saying, ie "don't judge a book by its cover", it is the thought that you "can do the same exact thing" as a more seasoned nurse with 20 years of patient care experience under his/her belt that worries us! There are things you simply haven't seen, and wouldn't know to anticipate. Safe patient care demands an experienced presence in the mix who can mentor and advise less experienced colleagues.
    2yearrnba and Susie2310 like this.
  7. 7
    I have a couple thoughts:

    I've never liked the equating of being thin or muscular or physically fit with being shallow or vapid. If anything, I think it should be associated with positive character traits. It requires self discipline, motivation and hard work.

    And, yes, of course any facility is in trouble if it doesn't have nurses with a wealth of experience. I don't care how bright and energetic or "up to date" new grads are. Experience trumps all. You don't know what you don't know 'cause you don't know it yet.
    LadyFree28, NB19938, tnmarie, and 4 others like this.
  8. 7
    Quote from DeBerham
    What I'd suggest is to get over it. NOTHING good will come from being so superficial. Is it their fault that they're attractive? No. Is it their fault that they are young? No. Are you liable to let your jealousy over SUPERFICIAL things ruin some potential relationships? Yes.
    I'm not jealous by any stretch of the imagination. I mentioned that the group of new hires ranges from early 20s to early 30s. I am in my early 30s, so I am in the same age range of some of these newly hired nurses. Jealousy is not the synonym of observation.
    Quote from DeBerham
    I'll say though that you may need an attitude adjustment just as much as these new nurses because your feelings will translate in to actions in how you treat/interact with them... and then we'll get to read new posts about how we continue to eat our young.
    I do not need an attitude adjustment, but your suggestion was certainly appreciated. I get along with this group of newly hired nurses wonderfully and appreciate the help that they will contribute to ease our staffing issues once they begin to come off orientation.
    Quote from Vespertinas
    This post reeks of reverse ageism. You said yourself that the hospital is probably hiring with cost-consciousness in mind so new RNs who are not recent grads are the ideal.
    There are masses of 40+ year-old newer RNs who changed careers or are late-entry nurses in the large metro area where I live, yet management hired no newer middle-aged nurses with one to three years of experience.

    Some people seem to have missed my point, which is that units need a healthy mix of experience and inexperience. Then again, some people are dramatic 'offendonistas' who purposely seek to become offended when no offense was intended.
    LadyFree28, MusicalCoffee, tnmarie, and 4 others like this.
  9. 1
    Right or wrong, when you're in the service industry, looks are a part of the package, as far as employers are concerned. This doesn't exclude other attributes such as personality and experience, of course. As far as ageism in nursing, it exists for sure....but who has to know? I highlight only the most relevant jobs on my resume, although I've been working for 24 years.
    anotherone likes this.
  10. 3
    Quote from QualityNurseRN
    While I understand that basics of what you are saying, ie "don't judge a book by its cover", it is the thought that you "can do the same exact thing" as a more seasoned nurse with 20 years of patient care experience under his/her belt that worries us! There are things you simply haven't seen, and wouldn't know to anticipate. Safe patient care demands an experienced presence in the mix who can mentor and advise less experienced colleagues.
    I agree with you. Fine points.

    Just throwing this out there, as a talking point to anyone. You walk in and your patient has committed suicide. What do you do? Who do you talk to first? What do you chart? What do you say to the police? What papers do you fill out?

    My guess, unless one has been very unlucky, this isn't something one comes across very often. And I'm hoping, if I'm in such an upsetting and touchy situation, I'll have some experienced hands guiding and mentoring me.

    I guess my point is that, there are things that only happen once in a blue moon. And if we throw away our most experienced nurses in favor of padding pockets... bad news.
    LadyFree28, tnmarie, and Esme12 like this.


Top