Wrote up a CNA, but I was the one who got the boot! - page 2

by MotherRN

11,476 Views | 54 Comments

About two weeks ago, I had an unfamiliar CNA on my night shift. She was 'helping out' with a shortage apparently. I am new on the job as well. I had previously been instructed to ''hold accountable' the CNA's on my shift by... Read More


  1. 4
    This is why I don't want to go back to a nursing job.
    MBARNBSN, anotherone, applewhitern, and 1 other like this.
  2. 2
    I think any time one issues an ultimatum one has to be prepared for the response not to be the one they wanted.

    It sounds like you are better off not being there. I hope you find something else soon.
    anotherone and MotherRN like this.
  3. 0
    Just a quick question, what were you doing when the call light was going off? When I worked 3-11, or 11-7, I answered call lights. Maybe you were passing meds, or doing something else. I was just curious.
  4. 1
    I have worked dysfunctional places. I try to focus on pt care and join with others that are trying to get the job done. And to pay a lot of attention to dynamics.... Hope you find a more functional environment.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  5. 3
    Quote from realnursealso/LPN
    Just a quick question, what were you doing when the call light was going off? When I worked 3-11, or 11-7, I answered call lights. Maybe you were passing meds, or doing something else. I was just curious.
    Good point, realnursealso. Even when I was busting my butt and really didn't have time to help the CNAs, I always tried to squeeze in some high-profile work, just to prevent the image of "never helping the CNAs". Even though it would set me behind on my med pass somewhat, I'd go into the dining room if they were short a person and help with breakfast or lunch. Maybe it was phony of me but I saw it as an investment for good relations, ultimately making my job easier. (CNAs ain't happy, ain't NOBODY happy.) Many CNAs see a nurse's job as "not so hard" and "sit around a lot and write while I do the dirty work." and even though it's not true in most cases, their perception is their reality. I ended up with a lot of CNAs that did not mind when I asked them to do things, because they knew I pitched in for them without even being asked.

    It's frustrating, though, because a nurse can do a CNA's job, but not the other way around. I didn't get a lot of "thank you's" when they punched out on time and said "goodbye" while I scrambled to finish my work.
    AnonRNC, VivaLasViejas, and tnmarie like this.
  6. 6
    I was on another hallway finishing with a resident. I came out of that room to answer the light, quite a distance from where I was. When I came around the corner, there she was, fruit cup in one hand standing at the wall chart, with her hip popped out, taking a leisurely bite, then went back to charting. She was facing the light the whole time and wearing a beeper. And only a few steps from the room. When she saw me coming, she just ignored me and kept eating/charting. She had been ignoring the light all night. So, I asked if she was going to get that and was asked the same question in return. I asked as her manager and was given an insubordinate response in return which then exploded in her hour long "You don't tell me nothin" rant in the hall outside resident rooms.

    Name another job where an employee would see their manager coming and just flat out ignore them, then be insubordinate and expect this to be okay. Only in a LTC facility where upper management doesn't hold the CNA's accountable.

    Please understand that if the light goes unanswered, then I get in trouble for poorly managing my shift and get written up. I don't have time to answer all the lights. I have more than enough nursing to do on my shift, which I also get written up for if it does not get done because I was answering too many lights. Please understand that this CNA had only been there for two hours of a four hour shift. She was filling in for a peak shortage, but really just riding the clock and not doing much work. I didn't know she was a protected employee from the day shift who had been with the facility for years. But what I learned from her rant that night was that I was being sabotaged and blamed for things that were being openly discussed on the day shift. Why was anything being discussed with CNA's about me? So, when she came on my shift, she didn't feel she had to respect me in anyway shape or form. She told me I was not her manager and had no right to instruct her in anything. Of course, in a perfect world, things would have been by the book. But, not on my job. So I actually learned more from the ordeal about my status on the job and found that useful. Whether I had quit two weeks ago or got fired yesterday, doesn't really matter. I was only there for about 24 shifts-two months PRN. I wouldn't be able to use the place as a reference anyway. At least I will get another two paychecks out of them.

    What I had to resort to in the end was going in the room to see that the resident was okay and turning off the light (as instructed by the DON) and telling the resident someone would be right with them if it was a non urgent request. Then go back to the 10 things that had been interrupted by answering the light. Things like wound care and med passes. Some of these residents call you because they want their tray removed. Or the refuse to wait to be put to bed and are in danger of falling on the floor if you don't get them dressed and put them in the bed. Just don't have the time. With all the money this place makes, they should bring in two extra CNA's for four hours at meal/bedtime to put these people to bed in a timely manner. But, CNA's who intend to work. They are about a third the cost of the nurses so it would save in nursing overtime when we run late because we were doing CNA work due to the patient ration being too high for the CNA's and nurses.

    I'm all about teamwork. But, I'm not about doing your work while you ride the clock and play.
  7. 0
    [QUOTE=CloudySue;7002114]Good point, realnursealso. Even when I was busting my butt and really didn't have time to help the CNAs, I always tried to squeeze in some high-profile work, just to prevent the image of "never helping the CNAs". Even though it would set me behind on my med pass somewhat, I'd go into the dining room if they were short a person and help with breakfast or lunch. Maybe it was phony of me but I saw it as an investment for good relations, ultimately making my job easier. (CNAs ain't happy, ain't NOBODY happy.) Many CNAs see a nurse's job as "not so hard" and "sit around a lot and write while I do the dirty work." and even though it's not true in most cases, their perception is their reality. I ended up with a lot of CNAs that did not mind when I asked them to do things, because they knew I pitched in for them without even being asked.

    I did the same. I had certain residents I knew I could handle on my own because they were able to stand up and support their weight so I could toilet them and help put them to bed. On my one of my last shifts I did total care for one paranoid resident with dementia who thought the CNA was a demon or something else scary and didn't want her to touch him. I did all his care without being asked. And I helped the other CNA on a different night who had a similar problem with this same resident. I was part of the team. The other nurse and I even bought them pizza about a week ago as team building on our shift for our regulars. In general, it was the extra CNA that night. Unfortunately, we have a problem child or two still who slack in their work as well. But, the majority were working together. It was a military order them about environment. That's not my personality.
  8. 0
    I left out the NOT in military environment. I am definitely not an authoritarian. Let's put it this way, if I were a professor, I'd be the cool professor sitting on the desk engaging the students in free exchange of ideals or out on a field trip.

    I really ought to be in education but it doesn't pay. Who knows, I may end up there yet!
  9. 3
    Quote from MotherRN
    ...yeah, I had a mysterious 'egging' of my car after the whole incident happened...so I guess they might know where I live.
    ......are they the freshman in highschool??? who even does that. losers!
    CloudySue, tnmarie, and MotherRN like this.
  10. 3
    I am not suprised. I saw this at my own job. There are a few that will actively get together and decide to gang up on some one else. Nurses and aides get involved. If you are the chosen one, there is very little you can do. Good luck. Hopefully you will find another job soon without so many psychos.
    Not_A_Hat_Person, tnmarie, and MotherRN like this.


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