Why In The Heck Should I Be A Loyal Nurse? - page 3

by TheCommuter 19,027 Views | 86 Comments Senior Moderator

As a nurse, is it really worth it to show loyalty to your place of employment? Perhaps there truly are benefits to being a loyal employee. Maybe not. Your thoughts on workplace loyalty are probably dependent upon the... Read More


  1. 1
    At my employer up until about 2 years ago it was a company I felt pretty loyal to. Then it all changed. Now they are pushing out EVERYONE with any sort of decent experience or any major health issues. They hire complete idiots who will work for next to nothing. Recently the nurses have been referred to as peons and the bottom of the barrel per several doctors (which I find to be amusing consider the real winner doctors they have hired recently) The whole dynamic has changed. Guess what....patient care is no where near what it used to be. Our "satisfaction" scores are plummeting, which of course we get punished for. I am looking hardcore to get out of this toxic environment. There is no loyalty left on either side. I feel bad for those who are just 2-3 years away from retiring as they feel stuck. They have spent their whole working life at this one employer and now they feel too old to start over. They just pray they can last the next few years.
    TheCommuter likes this.
  2. 0
    One place I was working at tried very hard to harass their older staff into quitting. Fortunately they only made it work on 2 nurses. The others are staying till they are fired. I have seen many nurses get thrown under the bus over the years. That said, my unit director is a very kind sweet lady who takes pts when we are short nurses. She is as close to perfect as one could ever be. I have been recruited by another unit and I always say no. I will never leave my current manager.
    But if she goes, I may too. The place overall is just about money. We don't even get a decent holiday meal anymore.
  3. 1
    I started my career in the late 70s, and in all of the years since, I have never seen what the OP describes as standard operating procedure. Executives, including nurse executives may wax and wane in favor, and I have seen entire departments eliminated or merged with other departments. In most of those cases, though, the displaced nurses and even nurse executives were offered other jobs within the network or at the very least, the first opportunity to bid on any open positions. The only nurses jobless at the end of the restructuring were those who chose to be. The only place I've ever "seen" the type of disloyalty to employees described by the OP is in the large California HMO where my sister, as nurse executive, purges her staff from time to time. I'd always assumed it was my sister's disloyalty to her employees, not the HMO's, although I could be wrong.

    In my current job, working for a large healthcare system, what I've seen is that every employee we've had to let go as a poor fit is offered 2-4 weeks pay after their employment ends and all possible assistance in finding a new job within the system. Only the employees who are fired for cause (like the guy whose solution to a recalcitrant Pyxis was to kick in the screen or the guy who was found passed out in the employee bathroom surrounded by vials of Fentanyl with a needle in his arm) aren't offered the chance to find a new position in the system. That's the way it's been everywhere I've worked in the past 35 years.
    Altra likes this.
  4. 5
    Disloyalty comes in many forms. Ever have layoffs anywhere you've worked? That's a form of disloyalty. How about cutting of pensions? That's disloyalty. As an employee, I'm not entitled to one day work 25% less than I did the day before. Yet that's *exactly* the type of thing employers do when they cut benefits, they're suddenly giving us less compensation, yet expecting the exact same level of work. Those are all forms of disloyalty on the part of the employer.
    Last edit by BrandonLPN on Nov 25, '12
  5. 8
    Companies were loyal in "the good old days" because the labor movement was much stronger and unafraid to exercise their power. Pensions and benefits were not just a gift that companies decided to dole out to their employees- those are all the winnings of the labor movement. The decline in pensions, benefits and incentives to stay with one employer go hand in hand with a weakening of the labor movement in the face of globalization, outsourcing and political changes. It's a major pet peeve of mine when people talk about past labor relations as being totally rosy and nice without giving a nod to the fact that labor waged a battle for that stuff.
  6. 4
    Quote from TheCommuter
    In summary, I am loyal to myself. I am loyal to my patients while I am on the clock and providing care to them. However, I will never be loyal to any entity that employs me. As soon as the people in upper management get tired of me, I know they’ll terminate my employment without losing one minute of sleep over me. And as soon as my workplace no longer meets my needs, I will quit without feeling a morsel of guilt. The feeling is mutual these days. It’s nothing personal.

    You are so right "The Commuter....thats exactly how i feel!
    Last edit by TheCommuter on Nov 25, '12 : Reason: [/QUOTE] tags
    MedChica, TheCommuter, nursel56, and 1 other like this.
  7. 0
    I think the reality is that it depends on the type, size, location of the hospital. Bigger hospitals run like a big business and RARELY show loyalty to anything other than money. Smaller hospitals USUALLY feel more like a family and are loyal to their employees..
  8. 3
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    In most of those cases, though, the displaced nurses and even nurse executives were offered other jobs within the network or at the very least, the first opportunity to bid on any open positions. The only nurses jobless at the end of the restructuring were those who chose to be.
    My workplace eliminated a department. Nurses had to find their own jobs within the system or leave. If there wasn't a suitable opening, oh well.
  9. 1
    I look out for myself. I feel no loyalty with my current employer. I will drop them the second I get an offer for better money or sign on bonus somewhere else. I don't work for charity.
    anotherone likes this.
  10. 1
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    I started my career in the late 70s, and in all of the years since, I have never seen what the OP describes as standard operating procedure. Executives, including nurse executives may wax and wane in favor, and I have seen entire departments eliminated or merged with other departments. In most of those cases, though, the displaced nurses and even nurse executives were offered other jobs within the network or at the very least, the first opportunity to bid on any open positions. The only nurses jobless at the end of the restructuring were those who chose to be. The only place I've ever "seen" the type of disloyalty to employees described by the OP is in the large California HMO where my sister, as nurse executive, purges her staff from time to time. I'd always assumed it was my sister's disloyalty to her employees, not the HMO's, although I could be wrong.

    In my current job, working for a large healthcare system, what I've seen is that every employee we've had to let go as a poor fit is offered 2-4 weeks pay after their employment ends and all possible assistance in finding a new job within the system. Only the employees who are fired for cause (like the guy whose solution to a recalcitrant Pyxis was to kick in the screen or the guy who was found passed out in the employee bathroom surrounded by vials of Fentanyl with a needle in his arm) aren't offered the chance to find a new position in the system. That's the way it's been everywhere I've worked in the past 35 years.
    Just because you haven't experienced something doesn't mean that it doesn't exist. Even if you enjoy using your crusty old bat status or whatever to your advantage.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.


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