Why do you think so many healthcare workers are mean and arrogant? - pg.5 | allnurses

Why do you think so many healthcare workers are mean and arrogant? - page 5

Not all of course, but many physicians, nurses, and other health care workers have mean and arrogant personalities. Why do you think this is? Is it that.... 1. You have to be very... Read More

  1. Visit  Virgo_RN profile page
    0
    Quote from mianders
    If you work in a hospital that allows physicains to verbally abuse you then perhaps you should change facilities. The hospital I work at has a strict policy about staff (this includes physicians) treating each other with respect. The responses to your post did not appear like "snippy defensive responses" although your response to theirs did.
    We have a similar policy. Nurses can (and have) file an incident report if a physician treats them poory (abusive language, raising voice, etc.). Not just nurses, ANYONE can write up anyone else for behaving in such a deplorable fashion.
  2. Visit  chadash profile page
    0
    Well, narcissism is everywhere, and some may be drawn to the bigger than life heroic image of health care, then, oh my, it ain't what they thought, it takes alot more than it gives, and their narcissistic supply is totally depleted, so that makes them cranky. I know it make me cranky
  3. Visit  classicdame profile page
    2
    The reason so many are mean and arrogant? They are tired.
  4. Visit  sharona97 profile page
    1
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    at the age of 43, i think i've been around long enough to state that i perceive an ever-increasing lack of respect and civility in our population.

    to the extent that the op is correct (my only experience comes as a patient but i have seen it), i think it's a mixture of:

    1) mean, arrogant people getting into positions with limited accountability (athletes, surgeons, ceos, high-end chefs, actors, etc ... pretty much anybody who's irreplaceable)

    2) the feces-follows-gravitational-pull principle means that their attitudes get handed off to those below them.

    3) then begins the lateral effects, otherwise known as misery loves company.

    4) number 2 repeats itself over and over all the way down the chain.

    add to all of that the unique stress of the medical environment and it just gets that much worse. patients are scared and vulnerable and just add to the problem.

    overall, though, i still think it's a symptom of the lack of compassion and civility in our culture.

    as the bumper stickers so eloquently state:

    mean people suck
    so true, yet i still believe in the power of change. not following the path of generalizational poverty and welfare. patterns of abuse. i believe people who put forth effort to be good people(ya'll in the south know what i mean) can be just that. but man is it going to take a generation or two to get some of it back?

    it all begins with me and you. good post!
    ♪♫ in my ♥ likes this.
  5. Visit  Tweety profile page
    1
    Quote from mikethern
    Holy crap, look at all the snippy defensive responses. May I remind you that I mentioned in my original question as a possible explanation......
    " 5. Most people in the world these days lack manners." ... (not just healthcare workers)

    Furthermore, if you think that all careers have workers as arrogant as physicians, you need to spend a few weeks in an operating room. The verbal abuse that some surgeons hand out is unsurpassed.
    I didn't think the answers above yours were all that snippy and defensive. Perhaps your way of looking at those around you is a bit extreme than it really is and you need to take another picture.

    Or perhaps I'm just too laid back. I'd say 95% of the people I encounter on a daily basis aren't arrogant or mean. They are just like me, stressed to the max trying to get through the day the best they can with the resources in front of them.

    I can deal with the 5% who are arrogant and mean. When I waited tables I came across more arrogant people as customers than I ever have encountered in nursing.

    I hope I'm not sounding arrogant or mean, just honest. We all have our of experiences.
    sharona97 likes this.
  6. Visit  sharona97 profile page
    0
    Quote from mikethern
    Well, it's true that O.R. nursing is the only type of nursing I have ever done. I just assumed all nursing was like this. I guess I am wrong.
    There are zillions of posts on this bb about bad days, wish i could have punched her in the face, I need to move on, how nurses eat their young. It's just not you Mike. YOU ARE NOT WRONG. From the other point of view I have seen sympathy and let us know how you are doing etc, this is a bb to vent on, which you did.

    What's good for one on this bb should be good for the next IMO.
  7. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    0
    Quote from mikethern
    not all of course, but many physicians, nurses, and other health care workers have mean and arrogant personalities.

    why do you think this is?
    [font="comic sans ms"]actually, i don't think so many health care workers have mean and arrogant personalities. i'm sorry for you that you do.
  8. Visit  TiredMD profile page
    5
    Quote from jlsRN
    Nurses used to order patients and families around, hospitals wouldn't let mothers stay overnight with their young children, strict visiting rules were enforced, and the public was expected to obey.
    Reminded me of a really interesting article I read in the NY Times. Interesting snap shot of how we used to practice.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/01/he...ce&oref=slogin
  9. Visit  Djuna profile page
    1
    Quote from TiredMD
    Reminded me of a really interesting article I read in the NY Times. Interesting snap shot of how we used to practice.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/01/he...ce&oref=slogin
    Some things change for the better, others change for the worse. Whilst in general society has become more self centred and rude, I believe we have made progress in many areas of life such as rights for women, children, gays and lesbians, minorities and the intellectually or physically disabled.
    Last edit by Djuna on Jan 3, '08
    lamazeteacher likes this.
  10. Visit  panamabrt profile page
    0
    Maybe they are in it for the wrong reasons.......$$$$.....not for the right reasons which is the natural nurtering feeling one desires to help others...
  11. Visit  ♪♫ in my ♥ profile page
    0
    Quote from TiredMD
    Reminded me of a really interesting article I read in the NY Times. Interesting snap shot of how we used to practice.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/01/he...ce&oref=slogin
    Thanks TiredMD for the post.

    What an eye-opener. Having just been through major surgery with my six-year-old daughter, I can hardly comprehend having had to leave her there by herself. We stayed up with her round-the-clock and, I believe, made the nurse's life a bit easier. DD certainly benefited by having mom or dad immediately hold her hand and talk to her each time she awakened during the night.

    My how times have changed, and definitely for the better in this regard.

    Of four doctors and eight nurses that we dealt with during our stay, the four docs were all very approachable and considerate as were six of the nurses. Fortunately, nurse #7 was called off our case after a few hours and nurse #8 wasn't ours to begin with.

    Now the PA, that's another story...
  12. Visit  nursemike profile page
    1
    Quote from ruby vee
    actually, i don't think so many health care workers have mean and arrogant personalities. i'm sorry for you that you do.
    i heartily agree. as a patient, as a family member of a patient, and as a nurse, i've found the vast majority of healthcare workers to be decent, caring, and compassionate. likewise, i've found most patients and their families to be appreciative and respectful.

    the exceptions do tend to stand out, but i have also noticed that there are times when good people--even me--have a bad day or a bad moment. i don't know many people in any walk of life who are perfectly awful, but i don't know any at all who are perfect. the patient's husband who is rude to me at the beginning of my shift may be a kind person acting out of worry and frustration. that doesn't make it okay, but if i respond with empathy and understanding, i may win an ally, rather than making an enemy.

    a trend i've noticed on my unit is that if i page a neurology resident, they often want to discuss the matter with their senior, or defer an order until the dayshift team arrives, whereas if i page a neurosurgery resident, i usually get an immediate decision. partly, i think this is because a lot of our neurology residents are fairly new, but i also think it takes a certain cockiness to cut somebody's head open and mess around in their brains. but i notice, too, that the neurogurgeons seem a bit more cordial to the nurses. that probably has a lot to do with experience and familiarity, since the more senior neurology residents are also quite cordial.

    i have heard some attendings of either service referred to as arrogant. i don't deal with attendings enough to have a strong opinion. but i have seen residents sitting at the bedside, holding a patient's hand, often enough to be skeptical of stereotypes of uncaring or arrogant doctors.


    i once had a call from a clerk who was getting grief from radiology because my patient wasn't there, yet. she called me in the middle of something more pressing and seemed to feel it was her job to pass the grief on to me. later, she told me it was rude of me to hang up on her. i explained, truthfully, that i did not hang up on her, but when i threw my phone across the room, it hit the wall and hung itself up. to which she replied, "well, as long as you didn't hang up on me--because that would be rude."

    stress doesn't always bring out the best in us. some behaviors should not be tolerated, but a lot of times a little patience and a sense of humor can de-escalate a situation more effectively than any amount of "standing up for ourselves."
    Last edit by nursemike on Jan 3, '08
    surferbettycrocker likes this.
  13. Visit  jackson145 profile page
    2
    In my work experience, it's been co-workers being nasty to other co-workers rather than employees being mean to patients/customers and vice-versa. It also seems like, at least in healthcare, everyone feels the need to dump on whoever is one rung lower on the hospital ladder. Nurses give techs a hard time, docs treat nurses like servants, techs take advantage of housekeeping. I've seen someone who is a nurse for many years that becomes a NP and looks down on former co-workers.
    Why do we do this? Are we all so insecure? Everyone spends so much time stressing the importance of their particular job and how hard they worked to get there. I imagine (most) everyone feels this way about their job, whether they have a license or tech cert, a 2yr degree or a 4 yr one, or 10+ years worth of education.
    I think it's fine to be proud of your accomplishments, but they should never define who you are. We are so much more than our employment.
    BBQvegan and sharona97 like this.


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