What if the Boston bomber was your pt - page 16

by imintrouble

31,193 Unique Views | 160 Comments

I'm just sitting here listening to the coverage of the terrorist attack. The suspect is in the hospital, injured, and obviously being cared for by nurses. What if that nurse was me? Related Article: Life after the Boston... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from KelRN215
    I wonder how they decided who these few are. I can see from an administrative and security standpoint wanting to limit the number of people involved in his care but I imagine caring for him day in and day out would be very emotionally taxing. If I had to care for him, I certainly wouldn't want to do it every day.

    There's no way anyone is ever alone with him. I have cared for hospitalized patients who were imprisoned (in juvenile detention for far less severe crimes) and even they were shackled and guarded by two prison guards at all times. From what I hear, he is handcuffed to the bed, shackled and in the custody of the US Marshals. The entire campus of BI where he is is on high alert and heavily guarded.
    Many facilities "know" who their "go to" people are.....they may have asked for volunteers and submitted those names to the authorities. It is true that prisoners are shackled to the bed etc...what the procedure is for this young man we have no way of knowing.

    Security checks are easy these days and many of us already have fingerprints on file. Give them a name and DOB and you're checked.

    I am SURE BID is well guarded.
    Last edit by Esme12 on Apr 26, '13
  2. 1
    Quote from Esme12
    Many facilities "know" who there "go to" people are.....they may have asked for volunteers and submitted those names to the authorities. It is true that prisoners are shackled to the bed etc...what the procedure is for this young man we have no way of knowing.

    Security checks are easy these days and many of us already have fingerprints on file. Give them a name and DOB and you're checked.

    I am SURE BID is well guarded.
    BIDMC itself is heavily guarded and, per friends who work there, they are "on high alert".

    According to the Attending MD who was there that night, staff DID have difficulty treating him knowing what he had done to our city:
    'What have we done? We just saved him.' How the medical team who treated Dzhokhar Tsarnaev battled first instincts not to help the teenage terror suspect | Mail Online

    Having now cared for one of his victims, the fury I feel towards his man has multiplied a thousand times.
    Last edit by Esme12 on Apr 26, '13 : Reason: TOS
    Esme12 likes this.
  3. 3
    I didn't really follow the story at all last week and just got the details today for the first time. The whole thing stinks like yesterday's diapers and I don't think you have to be a conspiracy nut to doubt the veracity of what we have been told. It must be considered a real possibility that those two may not be responsible. I don't have a firm opinion on it and don't want to debate it, so all of that aside, just consider that the nursing care that kid gets is probably the last human decency he will know in this world, as I think it's likely he is going to be convicted and executed. All the more reason to just treat him as one would any other patient. If he did do it, treating him with dignity now is demonstrative of the very best of all of us, and perhaps he would reflect on that. And of course we have to entertain the possibility that he is innocent and all that that would imply. Either way, it would be vitally important to provide care to the best of one's ability because in doing so you would have the opportunity to impact someone in utterly extreme circumstances in a very profound way. Think of it differently, as a very rare privilege. What an interesting way to consider it!
    Do-over, BrandonLPN, and Pepper The Cat like this.
  4. 0
    It would be more difficult for me to care for Jerry Sandusky. the now jailed former Penn State assistant football coach than it would for me to care for that teen bomber. Why? Because Sandusky started an organization called "The Second Mile" aimed at helping underpriveleged and troubled children, and the reason he did that was because he was a secual predator, and he groomed some of those kids in order to abuse them. He raped numerous boys. That activity ruined a lot of lives.
    Last edit by Franemtnurse on Apr 26, '13 : Reason: more information
  5. 0
    Prisoners are admitted ot our hospital with guards at bedside 24/7. The guards watch us. They listen to us. They observe our body language.
    Those guards KNOW their prisoners. Know what they've done. Who they are when they're behind bars at the prison.
    I worked with a nurse whose husband was one of those guards. She said it angered her husband when the prisoner/pt was treated with kindness and respect. In his eyes they didn't deserve it. They were scum who got what they deserved. He might have been right. He might have been completely right.

    I gave the above alot of thought. How would I feel as a guard, watching the prisoner/pt being brought snacks, warm blankets, and his pillow fluffed when requested? How would that make me feel?
    It would enrage me. I'd be mad at the nurse who exhibited one once of compassion, to someone so dangerous they have to be shackled to the bed.

    One of the posters...way back...mentioned there might be a problem caring for the bomber if her family found out. I understand that completely.
  6. 0
    Quote from Franemtnurse
    It would be more difficult for me to care for Jerry Sandusky. the now jailed former Penn State assistant football coach than it would for me to care for that teen bomber. Why? Because Sandusky started an organization called "The Second Mile" aimed at helping underpriveleged and troubled children, and the reason he did that was because he was a secual predator, and he groomed some of those kids in order to abuse them. He raped numerous boys. That activity ruined a lot of lives.
    Thank you, I agree.
  7. 1
    I think the hardest part of caring for a celebrity and/or infamous criminal would the scrutiny that you (the nurse) would be under. There'd be a gaggle of lawyers just waiting to tear you apart. This would be the real basis on which I'd be tempted to refuse such an assignment.
    anotherone likes this.
  8. 2
    Quote from imintrouble
    Prisoners are admitted ot our hospital with guards at bedside 24/7. .

    *** The guards annoy me. One recent prisoner I took care of had tried to escape from prison and jumped from a 3 story roof. He was intubated, sedated and chemicaly paralized. He had huge external fixators on both of his fracured femers. The guy wasn't going anywhere. I had to tolerate two fat guard taking up space in the small ICU room. They would get annoyed whenever I turned the volume down on the TV so I could do my assesments. They resented being asked to move whenever we had to bring in several staff to do cares. They just sat there watching TV and eating (constantly) while making comments about how easy this over time was.
    Esme12 and anotherone like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** The guards annoy me. One recent prisoner I took care of had tried to escape from prison and jumped from a 3 story roof. He was intubated, sedated and chemicaly paralized. He had huge external fixators on both of his fracured femers. The guy wasn't going anywhere. I had to tolerate two fat guard taking up space in the small ICU room. They would get annoyed whenever I turned the volume down on the TV so I could do my assesments. They resented being asked to move whenever we had to bring in several staff to do cares. They just sat there watching TV and eating (constantly) while making comments about how easy this over time was.
    The unit I work on gets a lot of prisoners. Sometimes the guards are really annoying. many make inappropriate jokes about the prisoners, staff ......huff and purf when we come in etc....
  10. 1
    MrChicagoRN likes this.


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