So Sick of Pushy Patients and Verbal Abuse - page 2

For the most part, I am described by others as being extremely patient and kind. But my fuse is wearing thin! with the increasing number of entitled, demanding patients, as well as verbally and... Read More

  1. by   Been there,done that
    Oh sure.My hospital has a program in place.

    There is big red X right on my patients azz.
    THAT is the spot I am supposed to kiss.
  2. by   crb613
    It may be a little different for me since I am in the ER. If a patient becomes verbally abusive, disruptive....I call the police. We do not fool with them....act like you have some sense or I am done. I am speaking of the a&o, not medical conditions, or injuries that would render a person unable to control their actions.
    You cannot get away with this type of behavior on the street, so don't come to my ER....become abusive, or disruptive, and expect to get away with it....ain't gonna happen!
  3. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from Limitless_84
    Your patients are paying customers who are receiving a service for their money.
    In this sluggish economy, many of the patients are not paying for the services that we render. Many are uninsured due to unemployment, underemployment, etc. So, a huge number of patients really are not paying customers after all.

    In many cases, it is the taxpayer who is footing the bill for these 'consumers' of healthcare.
  4. by   AntFlip7395
    Quote from Limitless_84
    Your patients are paying customers who are receiving a service for their money. Coming from the perspective of a mother with a medically fragile child, and also a BSN student, I can certainly empathize with some of the "demands" patients can make. I have always demanded competent care for my child, for instance, whether or not the nurse or physician has wanted to give it. I have been forceful when necessary, rude occasionally, and in every instance my child's well-being was at stake. Sometimes people are just douchebags, but I think fairly often they're simply sticking up for themselves the way they know how to.
    Nursing is not "a service for their money". We do not get direct reimbursement for our care. There is nothing wrong with expecting competent care for your child, but this expectation must be accompanied with a mutually respectful relationship with his/her caregivers. Do not expect to get the kindest, most competent care if you are not willing to be courteous and flexible while being firm about what you feel is best for your child.

    At this point, you are a nursing student. Once you are on the other side of the fence, as a nursing professional, I expect your viewpoint will change. You truly have little idea how it is for health care professionals. I believe it is important to listen to people and accomodate them, but this must be within reason. In other words, their "demands" must not jeopardize them, my other patients, or my nursing license. I could give so many examples of patients and families, the latter being the most prevalent, having ridiculous demands and how outrageously they act when their demands are not met. The saddest part of it all is that the powers that be often go ahead and accomodate them because they are afraid of losing business. This sets a precedent of coddling behavior that only makes it harder for the nurses to cope. While I realize that a hospital must make money to survive, there needs to be a code of conduct for patients and visitors that sets limits. I think the reputation of a hospital should stand on clinical excellence first and step far, far away from this butt-kissing trend. Just my
  5. by   ledzepfan
    Quote from AntFlip7395
    Nursing is not "a service for their money". We do not get direct reimbursement for our care. There is nothing wrong with expecting competent care for your child, but this expectation must be accompanied with a mutually respectful relationship with his/her caregivers. Do not expect to get the kindest, most competent care if you are not willing to be courteous and flexible while being firm about what you feel is best for your child.

    At this point, you are a nursing student. Once you are on the other side of the fence, as a nursing professional, I expect your viewpoint will change. You truly have little idea how it is for health care professionals. I believe it is important to listen to people and accomodate them, but this must be within reason. In other words, their "demands" must not jeopardize them, my other patients, or my nursing license. I could give so many examples of patients and families, the latter being the most prevalent, having ridiculous demands and how outrageously they act when their demands are not met. The saddest part of it all is that the powers that be often go ahead and accomodate them because they are afraid of losing business. This sets a precedent of coddling behavior that only makes it harder for the nurses to cope. While I realize that a hospital must make money to survive, there needs to be a code of conduct for patients and visitors that sets limits. I think the reputation of a hospital should stand on clinical excellence first and step far, far away from this butt-kissing trend. Just my
    Thank you
  6. by   Mulan
    Quote from ledzepfan
    Amen. One patient at my hospital wanted a milkshake but she was NPO (she was admitted with abd. pain)
    Her nurse wouldn't give in when the pt. became loud and belligerent.....so the pt. called a Condition H.
    She got her milkshake and then smirked that she should do that more often so she can get what she wants.

    Our hospitals "plan of action" in dealing with rude,demanding,unreasonable patients/family is to "remember
    they are sick and under a lot of stress". Well some people are just simply a$$holes whether they are sick
    or not. We have a Patient Liason employed at our hospital, but whose side does she come down on? Guess.

    Okay, so what's a Condition H, and how does that get an NPO patient a milkshake?
  7. by   pedicurn
    Quote from ledzepfan
    Amen. One patient at my hospital wanted a milkshake but she was NPO (she was admitted with abd. pain)
    Her nurse wouldn't give in when the pt. became loud and belligerent.....so the pt. called a Condition H.
    She got her milkshake and then smirked that she should do that more often so she can get what she wants.

    Our hospitals "plan of action" in dealing with rude,demanding,unreasonable patients/family is to "remember
    they are sick and under a lot of stress". Well some people are just simply a$$holes whether they are sick
    or not. We have a Patient Liason employed at our hospital, but whose side does she come down on? Guess.
    What would happen if you referred her request to surgical ??
    Here - our surgeons would boot her out if she needed to be NPO and refused to be
    Last edit by pedicurn on Jun 12, '11
  8. by   crb613
    Quote from limitless_84
    your patients are paying customers who are receiving a service for their money. coming from the perspective of a mother with a medically fragile child, and also a bsn student, i can certainly empathize with some of the "demands" patients can make. i have always demanded competent care for my child, for instance, whether or not the nurse or physician has wanted to give it. i have been forceful when necessary, rude occasionally, and in every instance my child's well-being was at stake. sometimes people are just douchebags, but i think fairly often they're simply sticking up for themselves the way they know how to.
    expecting competent care is fine, and all patients deserve it. i don't care if you are "paying" or not there is no excuse for bad manners. there are other ways to ensure your loved one gets the care they need. many times patients do not understand just because they want something, or something done a certain way.....their way may not be in their best interest.....and this customer stuff is ridiculous. you are not my customer, you are my patient....there is a difference.
  9. by   pedicurn
    Quote from wooh
    I still remember the day I got written up because I insisted on assessing my patient before getting that patient's uncle a sleep chair. Oh,and to add to my "rudeness" I also gave the patient's mother (a baby admitted with respiratory problems) a teaching sheet on secondhand smoking.
    Patients and their families don't care about what they NEED, it's all about what they WANT. And hospital management rewards their behavior.
    oh my goodness
    And if you did what the families wanted ... you might have been written up too.
  10. by   AngelicDarkness
    To the poster who stated we cater to what families and patients want not need - BINGO!
    Had a patient in the past who had mini-TIAs resulting in a temporary loss of independence, and a lot more need for care. In my facility, we had 1 nurse and 1 psw each shift for 98 people, and we had to find the time to care for this bedridden patient because family CANCELLED private care ("Not worth the cost"). The management fought it for a day and then decided that the staff have time to assist this lady every "30 mins". I've never been more disgusted with a family before.
  11. by   ledzepfan
    To anyone who doesn't know what a Condition H is in a hospital, google the name Josie King
    or Condition H. I don't know Josie King's mother personally, but I doubt she petioned, from the
    depths of her personal hell following the death of her daughter, for the creation of Condition H
    so an NPO pt. could GET A MILKSHAKE JUST BECAUSE SHE WANTED IT!!!
  12. by   Mulan
    It sounds like what most hospitals call a rapid response team.

    Still doesn't explain how an NPO patient was able to get a milkshake.
  13. by   ledzepfan
    The pt's admitting doc was a surgeon. She was NPO because not all the test results were available
    to the doc to determine cause of abd. pain and he didn't know if he needed to do surgery.
    The pt. got her milkshake because it was determined by the Condition H team and the nursing supervisors
    that it was most important to make the patient "happy" "satisfied" whatever you want to call it.
    Her nurse, a competent and caring nurse, quit shortly after this incident. I don't blame her.

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