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pedicurn

pedicurn LPN, RN

CVICU, Obs/Gyn, Derm, NICU
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pedicurn is a LPN, RN and specializes in CVICU, Obs/Gyn, Derm, NICU.

pedicurn's Latest Activity

  1. pedicurn

    Nurses, perception difference and education

    Quite frankly disagree. The nurse educator I work with has a lot of education and a high level of intelligence. Her perception is often of more value than mine. That is because she is very smart and has a couple of good quality nursing degrees. She doesn't even have a whole lot of experience. Maybe ? five years. I don't get upset about that. Many of the doctors I work with .... well they have even more intelligence (usually) and possess even more education. Their perception of many situations carries more weight than mine and the nurse educator. Do I get upset about that ? NNNOOOOOOO I value their input and seek it often. They are smarter than me and took way more classes in medical school. I have grown a lot. My perception has improved and developed over the years .... the docs have helped me with that. Are they snooty arrogant whatevers for gently and respectfully insisting their perception might carry more weight than mine ? No. They are more intelligent than me and have more education. I don't get upset about that. It's important that docs be highly intelligent and have lots of education Some nurses have less education than me and probably not as smart. Do they frequently come ask me for my input ? Do they value my perception? Yes ... that's why they keep asking me. They tell me they like seeking my input because I am 'smart' and 'see things more fully'. Does that mean i'm better than them? No *sigh* PS I would hope a health professional's educational level contributes to perception. That's why we seek higher education
  2. pedicurn

    Nurses, perception difference and education

    I've been busy away from here. Have come back, read the posts and wish to state: - I admit it was a poor example. I mentioned that. - However the original topic ' Nurses,perception difference and education' is a valid topic and people needn't get so upset if it is discussed. - Some people really get their underwear in a twist whenever nursing educational difference is discussed (some of these people are not even nurses). I'm getting tired of this. Crabs in a bucket. If nurses want to be real professionals they need to get over this issue. - Other professions insist on more standardised academic entry and higher academic standards ... wonder why so many nurses and observers get so upset whenever suggestion is made that nurses should have those sorts of standards too? Really some people need to get over themselves. Pink collar highly skilled role vs profession?.... hhmmmmm - Insinuating that someone is some kind of snooty, arrogant uppity individual for even mentioning the topic is silly. Crabs in a bucket -again
  3. This nurse's life is made so much harder by the selfish behaviour of the daughters. Irregardless of wanting a social life or not .... both of them should be pulling their weight and doing all the household work plus doing their share of caregiving. Perhaps some cultures understand this better than others?? I think one of the reasons multigenerational families work better for some cultures than others .... family members understand the responsibility and benefit of such an arrangement. Also with tough times ahead and changed financial environment (middle class disappearing) perhaps it would be a good idea for families to learn from other cultures and make the multigenerational household work for them? I think we will turn full circle. Persons of Western/northern Euro ethnicity will be forced to alter their 'family view' and do this for financial survival
  4. Not wishing to judge at all ... just making an observation here Some families seem to pool financial resources and this helps make the multi-generational household work eg Italian, Lebanese,Greek, Croatian people where I live will buy a home together. Parents leftover money plus welfare check will pay for non-family caregivers if needed, medications and extras. This seems to work for southern european and asian cultures but seems not a lifestyle choice preferred by other cultures (from my own observation). Not wishing to step on toes here .... I understand the pressures many families face and the challenges that render a nursing home the better choice than previous situation. However .... I would suggest that cultural factors do play a part in this issue. Having Western Euro, Southern Euro and MiddleEastern roots I can see the cultural issues at play here
  5. One could argue it does depend on what kind of parent they were As some parents don't care too much about their children when they are growing up ..... those kids might have to be saints to want to care for their elder parents. Often I've had to call families to come in and see their dying parent ..... they are not keen sometimes and reading between the lines I would say their parent may have been abusive. I don't think I would want to come in and see a dying pedophile parent. And I would definitely put a pedophile parent in a nursing home. Sad but fact of life for some people
  6. Agree In Sydney we see more of certain cultural groups in nursing homes and less of others. We see more Lebanese, Greek, Italian, Croatian caring for their elders at home and way fewer ethnically UK Euros caregiving at home. Though when I was a growing up it was not uncommon for Irish Catholics to insist on having their elders at home but I think that has changed now
  7. pedicurn

    Nurses, perception difference and education

    All well and good. And yes they often do finally start to take action when they are at their lowest point. However I would add - many of them don't have much to live for at this stage with health, family, money, job, friends all gone. If they have been to rehab upteen times I'm more interested in keeping them out of hospital by sorting their infection or whatever.' It is way less expensive having the community nurse or psych nurse visit these people at home and keep 'plugging up the holes' rather than having them coming into hospital
  8. pedicurn

    Nurses, perception difference and education

    Similar playing field .... just like doctors, engineers etc. I fail to see the issue with that. Works well for the others Nothing wrong with more nurses attaining some basic generic professional skill as well as their professional nursing skill. You know we have an issue when we receive a variety of response from new nurses regarding the difficulty of their state boards. Hearing 'it was way too easy it was pathetic, I can't believe I went to university for this' is as bad as hearing 'oh my goodness, it was the most difficult thing I have ever done' ... both make me cringe.
  9. pedicurn

    Nurses, perception difference and education

    Not at all As long as their perception originates from the same playing field
  10. pedicurn

    Nurses, perception difference and education

    Yes you are quite correct ... agree Intellect is a big part of it. Perception relates to intellect The nurses with the broader perception I am advocating for have good intellect. Without intellect and related broader perception we cannot be real professionals
  11. pedicurn

    Nurses, perception difference and education

    Agree However that was not what I was referring to. My initial post was about differences of perception due to nurse educational differences and was making the argument that a variation of generic professional skill (relating specifically to how we handle information) results in differences that we don't need
  12. pedicurn

    Nurses, perception difference and education

    Actually no - many of our p'ts like this do manage to take their meds a lot of the time. We are not going to be able to fix many of them. But what we can do is try to maintain their delicate balance to keep them functioning and out of the hospital. It's what happens in the short term that will determine whether he comes back in two days To answer your question 'how long does it last before they end at the hospital's revolving door'? Likely we see him again after two months - instead of two days.
  13. pedicurn

    Nurses, perception difference and education

    Perhaps I should have chosen a better example. My point seems to be lost along the way I was asserting that perception difference is broad in nursing and this causes us difficulty. Life as a nurse would be easier if we were on the same page and unifying education might be a good way of attaining this. So much nursing time and energy is wasted, one way or another - dealing with this
  14. pedicurn

    Nurses, perception difference and education

    Sounds quite wishy washy for a profession. It's almost in the fluffy bunny / unicorn/ rainbow realm ( that I was forced to endure during some of nursing school lectures) The argument further cements my creeping dissatisfaction with the premise that nursing is a profession. Making a general statement here ... When we state the degree of analytical endeavor we pay to any particular nursing problem is dependent on our nursing styles, personalities and beliefs .... then I believe we have lost the plot as a profession
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