Nurse Mobbing/bullying - page 4

:balloons: I am new to the forum and would like to get feedback from others who have experienced mobbing/bullying/harassment in the healthcare field. Please share so others might learn more about... Read More

  1. by   Thunderwolf
    "Mean" nurses, "eating their young", "catty nurses", etc. This is the ongoing black eye nurses give themselves and their own profession. It has been going on forever. But, I think it is a symptom of nursing in general...sort of like an adolescent teenager who refuses to get his/her act together. Nursing as a field has been trying for years, and I mean years, trying to discover itself. It is not limited to nursing, however. Corporate management and business, and the key word is corporate, also fosters this mentality...who can back stab who in order to shine better for the boss. Look for more and the same as hospitals and units become more places of "business" than of healing. When you work in a medical facility and verbal abuse from other professionals (doctors and nurses) is present on an ongoing basis, look at your hierachy. What happens at the top often becomes the rule for the bottom. A good example I can give you is my working at one hospital where doctors, as a norm, screamed and yelled at the nurses on an ongoing basis, with nurses left in tears and belittled in front of patients and families. Nursing as a field in this facility was accorded less respect than what was given to the janitor screwing in a light bulb. What was interesting here is that working at another hospital not 10 miles away, the same doctors (who had priviledges at both facilities) did not display this behavior. Nurses at this other facility were given respect for their skills and the care they provided for their patients. The point here is that management, and I mean the higher management, allowed it as the cultural norm in their facility...and the other did not. If you are caught in a facility that allows abuse of its staff from other staff who are in a higher position of power...if you can't change it, leave it. Why do I say this? Because, the culture will probably not change until the management does. And why do I say this? Because, higher level management will probably not change unless you are in a position of power to change it. Management 101. Believe me, the grass IS greener somewhere else.
  2. by   pickledpepperRN
    [QUOTE]
    Quote from chrysler
    A good example I can give you is my working at one hospital where doctors, as a norm, screamed and yelled at the nurses on an ongoing basis, with nurses left in tears and belittled in front of patients and families. Nursing as a field in this facility was accorded less respect than what was given to the janitor screwing in a light bulb.
    What was interesting here is that working at another hospital not 10 miles away, the same doctors (who had priviledges at both facilities) did not display this behavior. Nurses at this other facility were given respect for their skills and the care they provided for their patients. The point here is that management, and I mean the higher management, allowed it as the cultural norm in their facility...and the other did not. If you are caught in a facility that allows abuse of its staff from other staff who are in a higher position of power...if you can't change it, leave it.QUOTE]
    I found the same working registry.
    I am SO blessed to have the privilege of working with my coworkers. We have outlasted many CEOs, DON to VP of Patient Care, and TQM, Patient Focused Care etcetera...

    WE together will assure safe care. WE insist the nursing process and nursing staff are respected. WE together insist on provinding the finest possible nursing care. WE do all WE can to acheive this.
    SO WHAT is management only cares about the bottom line or tries to divide and conquer? Are they going to have most of their critical care staff give notice at the same time? We have never done this. We do communicate togethern ot as individuals. BUT in the background we know we WILL advocate for our patients or go elsewhere.
    So far with much education and planning we prevail.
    Last edit by pickledpepperRN on Oct 7, '04
  3. by   mattsmom81
    Sad it is so difficult to find an environment of solidarity in nursing. We could accomplish soooo much if we could stick together.
  4. by   DZcarrie
    after going to HR and my NM , i finally got a response about what to do about me being bullied. in short, i was being accused of neglect by fellow coworkers....which was cruel and totally false. i did not take this lightly.

    my NM wrote it off saying: did you ever hear the saying "nurses eat their young?"

    i put in my 2 weeks immediately and she was curious why! shortly thereafter we got a newsletter asking if we had any suggestions to keep other aides from leaving the facility!!!

    UNBELIEVABLE!!!!

    sad and pathetic!!!

  5. by   VickyRN
    Quote from Thunderwolf
    "Mean" nurses, "eating their young", "catty nurses", etc. This is the ongoing black eye nurses give themselves and their own profession. It has been going on forever. But, I think it is a symptom of nursing in general...sort of like an adolescent teenager who refuses to get his/her act together. Nursing as a field has been trying for years, and I mean years, trying to discover itself. It is not limited to nursing, however. Corporate management and business, and the key word is corporate, also fosters this mentality...who can back stab who in order to shine better for the boss. Look for more and the same as hospitals and units become more places of "business" than of healing. When you work in a medical facility and verbal abuse from other professionals (doctors and nurses) is present on an ongoing basis, look at your hierachy. What happens at the top often becomes the rule for the bottom. A good example I can give you is my working at one hospital where doctors, as a norm, screamed and yelled at the nurses on an ongoing basis, with nurses left in tears and belittled in front of patients and families. Nursing as a field in this facility was accorded less respect than what was given to the janitor screwing in a light bulb. What was interesting here is that working at another hospital not 10 miles away, the same doctors (who had priviledges at both facilities) did not display this behavior. Nurses at this other facility were given respect for their skills and the care they provided for their patients. The point here is that management, and I mean the higher management, allowed it as the cultural norm in their facility...and the other did not. If you are caught in a facility that allows abuse of its staff from other staff who are in a higher position of power...if you can't change it, leave it. Why do I say this? Because, the culture will probably not change until the management does. And why do I say this? Because, higher level management will probably not change unless you are in a position of power to change it. Management 101. Believe me, the grass IS greener somewhere else.
    Excellent post; couldn't agree more. The culture of a unit comes from the top. The manager/ DON/ CNO will often try to shift the blame elsewhere, but if the event occurred on his or her watch, then the person at the top is ultimately responsible!
  6. by   VickyRN
    [QUOTE=spacenurse]

    I found the same working registry.
    I am SO blessed to have the privilege of working with my coworkers. We have outlasted many CEOs, DON to VP of Patient Care, and TQM, Patient Focused Care etcetera...

    WE together will assure safe care. WE insist the nursing process and nursing staff are respected. WE together insist on provinding the finest possible nursing care. WE do all WE can to acheive this.
    SO WHAT is management only cares about the bottom line or tries to divide and conquer? Are they going to have most of their critical care staff give notice at the same time? We have never done this. We do communicate togethern ot as individuals. BUT in the background we know we WILL advocate for our patients or go elsewhere.
    So far with much education and planning we prevail.
    Excellent post, spacenurse, and thank you for being such a positive example. I totally agree with Mattsmom81, if we nurses exhibited solidarity, we would be an invincible force!
  7. by   barefootlady
    I have tried to be a reasonable, contributing, hardworking teammember at most, if not every facility, I have ever worked. In the last 5 years I have picked up vibes from other coworkers, I was respected, I was chosen to precept, I was sent to special classes, but I was not always included in the unit click. That was ok, I was older, more focused on family than partying, and I have a full schedule most of the time. Lately, I was told that I am very formidable to deal with. Now, I asked myself, what are you attempting to say, but just not speaking plain English. Well, it seems that a certain bully or two at the new job has found my "look you in the eye and tell you just exactly how it is", a little different and difficult to deal with. If I say "NO" then I mean it and I usually have a good reason for saying it. I do not accept the excuse "everyone" does it this way. I want it done right, so if you have a problem, just say so, we can discuss it, we can even agree to disagree, but if it is not policy, not done with the best interest of the patient, then I will still say NO. After all of the wordy garble, what I am trying to say is, if you bully me, I WILL have an answer, an action, and remedy. Sometimes it is just a misunderstanding, sometimes its real trouble, sometimes it means a new job for one of us, but end the end, don't bully me unless you can take some of the same medicine. After 25 years I am no patsy, so don't come here if you can't swing the bat.
  8. by   elnski
    I used to feel angst and disgusted by the people who love to make themselves appear better in expense of others, even it means causing harm inside and out..and feel oh so sorry for those who cant defend for themselves..all they can do is cry,rationalize things up 2 d point of blaming themselves.. i just cant stand these miserable people who find joy harassing and even planning evil to their colleagues for the sake of their selfish interests..whether its for their id or ego, i am not capable of understanding it...
    but i guess these days i feel saddened when i hear these issues..saddened by the thought that these offenders will have their own dose when the right time comes for them to pay off.. nuthing is void in this world.. surely, those innocent, helpless cries will continue to reverberate together with all the negative energies these offenders has attracted and regenerated...unconsciously consumed they will be, and until at the point of death will remain unhappy...


    know thy self, love ur self....it wont hurt!!!
  9. by   CseMgr1
    Quote from mattsmom81
    I agree that so many religious people have a huge problem with 'seeing the speck in another's eye while ignoring the log in their own'. I no longer am active in the church because of some of the same things you describe...as I tired of the hypocrisy.
    Halleleuyah! My late mother, who was very active in our church until I was twelve, tore up her membership letter right in front of God and everybody for the same reason you no longer go to church. My son, who attends chruch regulary, is petrified that I won't go to Heaven because I don't go. I have to remind him that I know where it is!
  10. by   TracyB,RN
    "had one employer who refused to pay me, then after 3 months of requesting my check from everyone and their brother (and being talked to like I was garbage) they finally paid me. I reported them to the labor board and guess what they got fined $220.00 per day X 30 days for not paying me. I will be getting over $6,000.00 for standing my ground. Most people probably would have feared for their job and walked away. Not me. I didnt need to work for a nursing registry that treated me like that. If they screwed up my check once they would probably do it again."

    WOW!!! That is awesome. How long did it take for the labor board to correct that situation? I filed a claim with the labor board here in IL back in 2000. Well, here it is, almost 2005 & I am still waiting for the $6,700 that a former employer owes me for OT wages. They are "still looking for her." The labor board has issued an alias summons to my old boss. She is NOWHERE to be found. I can't help but wonder if her attorney husband has something to do with this "disappearance."
  11. by   alphafe
    Could it be that nurses have internalized much anger from often having a history of overwhelming caregiving -- often to dysfunctional family members in their own childhoods? I hypothesize that a disproportionate number of nurses are:
    children of alcoholics, incest survivors, battered women, or women who were forced into caregiving roles at an early age (the family member who "parented the parent..." They identify with caregiving but are furious at having to do it and, management/superiors represent the big bad parent... Please comment
  12. by   lifeisbeautiful
    Quote from alphafe
    Could it be that nurses have internalized much anger from often having a history of overwhelming caregiving -- often to dysfunctional family members in their own childhoods? I hypothesize that a disproportionate number of nurses are:
    children of alcoholics, incest survivors, battered women, or women who were forced into caregiving roles at an early age (the family member who "parented the parent..." They identify with caregiving but are furious at having to do it and, management/superiors represent the big bad parent... Please comment
    I agree with you! I noticed in nursing school that the 'know-it-all' competitive and aggressive students were, for the majority, the women with the controlling hubby at home. These women complained all of the time about there lives (like nobody else has problems) and were miserable to do clinicals with. Unfortunately, these behaviors transfer right over into the paid profession of nursing, but are now 10x worse. it all comes down to self-esteem, integrity and respect. Rude, snooty nurses have none of these.
  13. by   mattsmom81
    There is some truth to the sad fact that too often the abused become the abusers.

    It takes a lot of resolve and self work; 'knowing of thyself' to confront prior abuse issues.. Look at incest and child and spousal abusers...how often were they victims themselves earlier in life; or observed it in their familes. Too often humans will subconsciously follow the examples set and not become introspective enough to counter act the effects.

    I feel this phenom is in play in the nursing/healthcare 'family' as well.

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