My bad attitude My bad attitude - pg.7 | allnurses

My bad attitude - page 7

This might get a little long, and windy. I am sorry. I'm going to start off by explaining last Sunday that I worked, as I feel this is the main problem. It was the 4 or 5 really bad shift for me. ... Read More

  1. Visit  Mersa59 profile page
    #78 0
    One of the things that you can do:
    Document!!
    Document how many staff you have on any given shift. Then document safety issues with your patients.
    Document outcomes, secondary to not enough staff, and how the outcome would have been could of been different if more staff were available.
    keep a runing log going of this to turn into management and administrators.
    If they want patients coming into their hospitals and want their hospitals to be known as patient friendly, safe, effective, a good place to be when your ill....welll they will listen to /facts that have been documented ......Then just maybe your staffing quota will be raised to meet the needs of your specific unit/
    mersa

  2. Visit  bigredrn57 profile page
    #79 3
    Quote from WitchyRN
    Also wanted to add, when managers like this tell you that you have a "bad attitude", I think you should wear it as a badge of pride. it means you aren't afraid to advocate for your patients or yourself.
    Once management finds they can "temporarily be short-staffed," they will continue to do this. For after all, "you fail to see the big picture," and "just you has complained." This is the load of crap they tried to hand me. I was also told I had a negative attitude. I stood up for my patients and my staff. Management took this as a threat to their control or lack thereof. They gave me a choice, resign or be fired. I had no write ups against me. I resigned as I realized I was in a miserable no win situation. Since then I have become a traveller, and make more money. If I don't like a place I don't renew my contract and move on. This is what works best for me. It can for you too. Why be miserable? It's not a surrender. It's an advance in a different direction. Be good to yourself.:spin:
  3. Visit  rozam117 profile page
    #80 0
    Dear Jess -

    I'm a brand new LPN and have had the most similiar experience (with one RN supervisor) and definitely have had the feelings you expressed regarding your character.

    Please keep up the good work...you are an inspiration to those that know you for who you are! Hang in there!

    Ro

  4. Visit  gal220RN profile page
    #81 1
    I wanted to respond to the "bad attitude" comment that is being discussed. There is nothing harder than having a horrible shift- the ones where you do not pee for 14 hours, you haven't had time to drink a cup of water, much less eat- and maintaining your composure. I have certainly been guilty of letting the four-letter words fly like a drunken sailor before crumbling into a pile of tears. In the end, I have to pull myself together and just get through the day. Sometimes, this is the best anyone can do.

    I have also learned that when we are stressed, our brains let our bodies and our emotions know it. That surge of adrenalin, dopamine and all those other wonderful neurotransmitters put us in fight or flight- neither mode that makes for rational thought or action. Our ability to have a conversation that is mutually beneficial is removed- we literally can not do it. So we dumb-down our words to grunts, curses or silence. Can you not picture in your mind how true this is?

    If you are prone to acting out or being negative when stressed, there are some FANTASTIC resources on learning how to deal with those responses. For those of you who retreat into silence (i.e.- just leave, it's not worth it), you might not have as much conflict, but you will all certainly have ulcers.

    At NTI, they presented the material- "Crucial Conversations" by a group of gentlemen who have worked with professionals all over the world. It absolutely changed my life- not only at work, but at home and with my family. You can read the book or listen to the DVD's or even go to their website- just Google "Crucial Conversations"

    Please Please!!! Check it out! I thought it was fantastic!
  5. Visit  rozam117 profile page
    #82 1
    Dear All -

    Thanks for your kind words & advice! I have not let any four letter words go, although I thought them, I have definitely left then cried, and totally totally understand the standing through the shift, no pee break, no food.

    Again, I am a brand new (6 mo graduate with 5 mo experience) LPN. It has become a horror story and I am currently looking for a new employer before I become a 41-year-old fired for the first timer too. It has been very discouraging.

    Thanks again!

    Ro
  6. Visit  MassED profile page
    #83 1
    Quote from JessieRN
    This might get a little long, and windy. I am sorry. I'm going to start off by explaining last Sunday that I worked, as I feel this is the main problem. It was the 4 or 5 really bad shift for me. We started with 8 patients/nurse (very very extreme for our floor). And ER started calling for admits. The oncall MD was rounding, and I made the offhand comment to him that it was too much to deal with, and I didn't feel it was safe for the patients. This put him in an uproar. Next thing I knew he called the ER doc, informed him he would not except any more admits to our floor, and he also called the admin on call, who he demanded come help us. She had worked the previous night due to call-ins.

    Now, the friday before was my yearly eval. I was graded as a "role-model" employee, and my manager offered no compliants at all about my performance. I was also given a 5% raise due to my high quality work. I was also told my co-workers enjoyed working with me, and patients had good things to say about my care.

    Now, let's fast forward to Tuesday, my first day at work since "black Sunday" as we are calling it. It is a much better day. Four patients that I can pet and pamper all I want. And I'm happy. At 4pm I was called to the DON's office. There sits the DON, and both assistant managers, including the one that just praised me Friday. These are the things I was told

    • "A large majority" of my co-workers on my floor complain about my poor attitude, and state I always complian
    • "All of the ICU nurse" hate to have to call me about a patient, because I never take care of the situation, and I am rude.
    • I had received numerous complaints from patients. When I pushed further, they were only able to name one patient's WIFE, who was only in room with the patient for twenty minutes after his admit. She informed me when I first entered the room that we were terrible nurses, and she would be talking to the DON--all before I ever opened my mouth. I immediatly informed management.
    • I was told the MD from weekend had informed them I was rude, and constantly complianed about the worked load. Well, maybe I was a little ill, and maybe I did complian. So did the other two nurses and everyone else on shift. Who wouldn't complain with 8 patients, 4 total cares, and not a tech in sight to assist?
    • Also, was informed I had no right to complain about "bad shifts" that were shortstaffed because its wasn't the norm. Those days were to be expected.
    • Made the comment that "some people will complain if you give them two patients. We think you might be one of those people, and it will not be tolerated".
    • Also stated "all the unit sec" said I was "snappy" when they called to report patient needs". We only have two sec, and one is my mom. The other says she has never complianed about anyone, much less me.
    Now, since then I have spoken to many of my co-workers, including 5 ICU nurses. They have all been shocked by what was said, and stated they have never had a problem with me, and never heard anyone else complain about me. The MD stated he informed them I was "nervous and frazzled" which "wasn't my usual", and he was concerned about the staffing level, and he expressed that he was not happy with them leaving us like that.

    Also, I have complained very rarely to management. The only other time I have complianed about staffing was a couple of weeks ago when we had 7 patients with no tech, and the supervisor had not attempted to find any help. Our manager helped us, and I thanked her--we even give them a thank you card for their help.

    This just really upsets me. I have always been more then willing to help when I could. I have worked my tail off to be the best I could be, even when shorthanded. And I get along with everyone; I have talked to some about leaving, and they have begged me to stay. I just don't understand why this happened. I felt attacked, and I felt like my character was picked apart. It was very degrading. I have worked there 4 years without a single problem. I'm just a little lost right now.
    it is bullying behavior by management when you step forward to report an unsafe situation and then suffer retaliation by management. I would call your local Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Was this review put in your personnel report? All the more reason to call them and inform them - they can advise you on legal recourse. Don't tolerate this - this is why nurses are leaving this damn profession because of jerks like that. It sounds like that doc was sticking up for you and that unit - what does that doc think about the position you were put in? Call your nursing board also... there must be repercussions for management to treat you this way....
  7. Visit  MassED profile page
    #84 0
    Quote from canoehead
    I've been there also- I almost totally agree with Vegas, but odds are you will have the same problem in your next job, and jobhopping is hard on the nerves and the reputation.

    I want to point out that every one of your coworkers, the secretaries, and the doc is backing you up on what happened that day. Yes, it was a miserable day, and Yes, you did right by your patients, and actually you did right by the hospital by stopping unsafe care. (Damned if they will admit it though.) You did a good job.

    As for your entry in the bad attitude club- well welcome home babe! We're glad to have you!. Amazingly, if they fired everyone with a bad attitude at my workplace there wouldn't be much of a hospital left. I for one, consider "attitude" a desirable quality in my coworkers. But then I'm a night ER nurse, and you know how weird we can get.
    or your husband could write an article about the horrid staffing, discrimination (in my case being white on a black floor), emotional abuse and disrespect to the local paper that nurses face on a certain floor in a certain hospital (esp. in a small town!). That turned some heads! They stayed away from me - I found out about it AFTER the fact, but it left an impression!!!
  8. Visit  MassED profile page
    #85 0
    Quote from canoehead
    I've been there also- I almost totally agree with Vegas, but odds are you will have the same problem in your next job, and jobhopping is hard on the nerves and the reputation.

    I want to point out that every one of your coworkers, the secretaries, and the doc is backing you up on what happened that day. Yes, it was a miserable day, and Yes, you did right by your patients, and actually you did right by the hospital by stopping unsafe care. (Damned if they will admit it though.) You did a good job.

    As for your entry in the bad attitude club- well welcome home babe! We're glad to have you!. Amazingly, if they fired everyone with a bad attitude at my workplace there wouldn't be much of a hospital left. I for one, consider "attitude" a desirable quality in my coworkers. But then I'm a night ER nurse, and you know how weird we can get.
    or your husband could write an article about the horrid staffing, discrimination (in my case being white on a black floor), emotional abuse and disrespect of other nurses, to the local paper, that nurses face on a certain floor in a certain hospital (esp. in a small town!). That turned some heads! They stayed away from me - I found out about it AFTER the fact, but it left an impression!!! :heartbeat
  9. Visit  lamazeteacher profile page
    #86 2
    Quote from MassED
    or your husband could write an article about the horrid staffing, discrimination (in my case being white on a black floor), emotional abuse and disrespect to the local paper that nurses face on a certain floor in a certain hospital (esp. in a small town!). That turned some heads! They stayed away from me - I found out about it AFTER the fact, but it left an impression!!!
    As someone who experienced mamny years during which females were victims of discrimination, and joined the legions of feminists who have changed that scene considerably, I'm very concerned that some of you younger Nurses think you need to speak through your man. Surely today's world accepts a woman's voice almost as readily as a man's! (Although the Hillary/Obama conflict has put us back and/or raised the sex discrimination monster).
  10. Visit  MassED profile page
    #87 0
    Quote from lamazeteacher
    As someone who experienced mamny years during which females were victims of discrimination, and joined the legions of feminists who have changed that scene considerably, I'm very concerned that some of you younger Nurses think you need to speak through your man. Surely today's world accepts a woman's voice almost as readily as a man's! (Although the Hillary/Obama conflict has put us back and/or raised the sex discrimination monster).
    Let me be clear. I worked in a small hospital in North Carolina where being white was the minority. From the word go, the floor I worked on treated me horribly. I dealt with it, talked with my manager, all to no avail. I would come home and be at a loss - having nightmares, being angry, and not knowing how to make it stop. Nothing made it stop - the anger of this area was very deep. My manager was white and I'm sure she didn't want to touch any problems that might stir the majority. So my husband, like I wrote, I found out had written an article about reverse discrimination and something about a hospital needing to value people, not to be divisive, and to treat each other with respect. I was initially angry, only because this small town happens to read the paper, and I was afraid that I would not be able to keep my job or find another within this hospital (the only one). I just knew there was going to be retaliation because he SIGNED HIS NAME and my last name is not common in that town. So that's the story. And it's nice you might be very concerned about what some younger nurses may think, but I absolutely do not. It was also very nice that my husband felt that in some way, by writing a piece to the paper that he could possibly make a difference with reverse discrimination and how it was affecting the nurses within the hospital. I understood where he was coming from - not coming to my aid, certainly, but he wanted to ease my suffering. I would do the same for him - and tell him after, only because a woman standing up for her man would be called a "meddler." We love each other and want each other to be professionally happy.
  11. Visit  gal220RN profile page
    #88 2
    WHOOOAH NELLIE!

    It looks like we have left the original conversation and jumped down at least 10 rabbit holes, including age (new nurse vs. old nurse), race, feminism, marriage! Either we need to start fresh threads or focus on the original topic- helping a fellow nurse who was hurting from an unfair situation.
    I would never attempt to squash the freedom of thought that occurs when intelligent professionals come together in such a forum as this. We would all do well to remember our words carry power, so we need to use them wisely.
    From reading the previous posts, it seems there are so many different perspectives being expressed. Maybe we should consider creating new designated threads for each of the above topics. They are each of significant importance and deserve due attention.

    For now.... can't we all just have a group hug?
  12. Visit  MassED profile page
    #89 0
    Quote from heelgal
    WHOOOAH NELLIE!

    It looks like we have left the original conversation and jumped down at least 10 rabbit holes, including age (new nurse vs. old nurse), race, feminism, marriage! Either we need to start fresh threads or focus on the original topic- helping a fellow nurse who was hurting from an unfair situation.
    I would never attempt to squash the freedom of thought that occurs when intelligent professionals come together in such a forum as this. We would all do well to remember our words carry power, so we need to use them wisely.
    From reading the previous posts, it seems there are so many different perspectives being expressed. Maybe we should consider creating new designated threads for each of the above topics. They are each of significant importance and deserve due attention.

    For now.... can't we all just have a group hug?
    Whooooah nellie is right - the comment about men coming to the aid of women? (nothing to do with women's lib, feminism, etc ) Was out of line, and off the mark... big time. My point was merely that my hubby was doing something kind for his wife (albeit without her knowing) who was being mistreated. Sweet.

    Who knows what the original discussion was about by now.....
  13. Visit  lamazeteacher profile page
    #90 0
    Dear MassED(interesting moniker):

    I guess the patients at that hospital in NC were mostly African American, too. What a rich cultural experience! I take it you've moved elsewhere......

    Husbands who are writers are few, and its a gift he gives you, it seems, when he writes something that he hopes will improve your situation. HOWEVER, the females who went before you struggled greatly to push aside those males who went where they thought females feared to go. That kept us down, thinking only males could represent us effectively. That's why government is composed mostly of males, and "good old boys clubs". Cliques are hard to fight.

    The next time you chose a new place to live, I'll bet you investigated all aspects of it (not to say a white ghetto is any better than an African American one). You are "blessed" to have someone who loves you so much, he can't stand by while you're made miserable, without letting the whole immediate world know his view of it. It would be better if you collaberated about the action needed, though.

    Next time you're in a fix, you could write something, that's from you, taking responsibility for improving your own life

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