Most shocking thing you've seen another nurse do? - page 8

SNF. RN supervisor summoned (overhead, at about 0300) me to one of her rooms. She was attempting to insert an NG tube in an alert man, about 40, alcoholic, with varices. Told me she felt a... Read More

  1. Visit  JesusKeepMe profile page
    0
    Nooooooooooooooooooo! Oh my gosh. What is it with people and insulin? Read the order, check the blood sugar, read the order again. If it seems like too much insulin, it just might be. Check check and triple check. Scarey.
  2. Visit  JesusKeepMe profile page
    1
    Quote from T-Bird78
    When I was in nursing school I had a clinical rotation at an acute care facility. One of the CNAs inserted a Foley into a pt's rectum (because the pt hadn't passed gas) and tied a plastic grocery bag around the other end to catch the gas and any solids that may escape. My fellow student asked why it wasn't done as a sterile procedure, and the CNA said it didn't need to be sterile because it was going in the butt. I shook my head and walked out of the room.
    This is wrong on so many levels. CNA's don't insert rectal tubes for one. Two, even if CNA's were allowed to peform this procedure, why would she think its okay to tie a plastic wlamart bag at the end to catch gas and fecal matter? Imagine what the family of that pt would be thinking when they walked in and saw a walmart bag and a tube hanging from their loved ones butt.....this is so wrong.
    HeartRN_09 likes this.
  3. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    2
    CNA's can insert rectal tubes...although check your state Nurse practice act...for example....North CarolinaI am more appalled at the grocery bag for collection!!!
    nrsang97 and Rose_Queen like this.
  4. Visit  Rose_Queen profile page
    3
    Quote from T-Bird78
    When I was in nursing school I had a clinical rotation at an acute care facility. One of the CNAs inserted a Foley into a pt's rectum (because the pt hadn't passed gas) and tied a plastic grocery bag around the other end to catch the gas and any solids that may escape. My fellow student asked why it wasn't done as a sterile procedure, and the CNA said it didn't need to be sterile because it was going in the butt. I shook my head and walked out of the room.
    There is nothing sterile about the GI tract- it is open to the environment on both ends and the living environment of countless bacteria. There is no need for sterile technique for insertion of a rectal foley/tube. Heck, even colonoscopies are done using clean rather than sterile technique!

    The only issue I can see with this is the use of the plastic bag. Our rectal tubes are connected to foley bags without a urimeter. A possible second issue is a CNA doing the insertion if state practice rules and institution policy don't allow them to do this.
  5. Visit  Future FNP 14 profile page
    0
    The charge nurse with 20 plus years experience in ER gave the fake epipen injection to a resident having severe allergic reaction.
  6. Visit  LadyFree28 profile page
    1
    Quote from nursejuvie
    The charge nurse with 20 plus years experience in ER gave the fake epipen injection to a resident having severe allergic reaction.
    WOW!
    nrsang97 likes this.
  7. Visit  Ativan profile page
    2
    A dialysis nurse rang the patient call light to let me know that the patient had "suddenly become unresponsive and had no blood pressure." I was the only nurse on the floor and was doing a dressing change in another room, but heard the call light going off for several minutes before I got in there. The patient was grey and obviously dead. The nurse was still fiddling with the dialysis machine.

    BTW, can any nurses out there tell me what could cause a patient to suddenly die right after being hooked up to a dialysis machine? I'm thinking clot? Is it nurse error or just bad luck? Thanks.
    nrsang97 and Esme12 like this.
  8. Visit  GundeRN profile page
    2
    Quote from Ativan
    A dialysis nurse rang the patient call light to let me know that the patient had "suddenly become unresponsive and had no blood pressure." I was the only nurse on the floor and was doing a dressing change in another room, but heard the call light going off for several minutes before I got in there. The patient was grey and obviously dead. The nurse was still fiddling with the dialysis machine.

    BTW, can any nurses out there tell me what could cause a patient to suddenly die right after being hooked up to a dialysis machine? I'm thinking clot? Is it nurse error or just bad luck? Thanks.
    Oh my goodness! Are there not code blue buttons!? Not that she could have made more of an effort even if there wasn't.
    nrsang97 and Hygiene Queen like this.
  9. Visit  danceyrun profile page
    1
    Quote from Ativan
    A dialysis nurse rang the patient call light to let me know that the patient had "suddenly become unresponsive and had no blood pressure." I was the only nurse on the floor and was doing a dressing change in another room, but heard the call light going off for several minutes before I got in there. The patient was grey and obviously dead. The nurse was still fiddling with the dialysis machine. BTW, can any nurses out there tell me what could cause a patient to suddenly die right after being hooked up to a dialysis machine? I'm thinking clot? Is it nurse error or just bad luck? Thanks.
    OMG!! What did she think was going to happen with the machine?! Crazy
    Hygiene Queen likes this.
  10. Visit  cardiacfreak profile page
    9
    We had a nurse hang Primacor and run it in as an antibiotic (200m/hr). Thankfully he survived, when the nurse was questioned she stated she thought it was an antibiotic. It clearly stated on the bag what to run the gtt at.

    Had a CNA take a patients o2 (6L hiflo)off to take him to the bathrm even though it was written on white board to ambulate with o2. The family was present and told the CNA the o2 had to be left on. The patient ended up on the bathrm floor not breathing. It was my patient and I was furious. The patient survived but ended up in ICU.

    Recently during a code the patient was in v-fib and resident was calling it PEA, wouldn't let us shock. The code leader told him it was v-fib but resident said, "He doesn't have a pulse so it's PEA." Then asked if anybody had any suggestions, we all shouted SHOCK. Someone tried to explain that you don't have a pulse with v-fib but the silly resident didn't believe us. Needless to say the patient died and the resident was reported. What is really frustrating about this is our policy changed about 2 months ago and the nurses can not administer medications or shock without an order from the resident if he/she is present. Why are we ACLS certified then? Exception is in ICU, we can shock prior to resident being present but cannot admin drugs. Can anybody say crazy.
  11. Visit  dudette10 profile page
    10
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    On our paper MAR the insulin orders read:
    Novolog 100 units/ML vial. Give XX units SC with meals provided BS is 150 or greater.

    One morning our RN supervisor had to pass meds due to the LPN calling sick. (RNs almost never pass meds at our facility). A resident had an order for 8 units of Novolog with breakfast. This RN read the MAR, saw the part that said the vials were "100 units/ML" and thought the order said to give 100 units of Novolog. She drew up 100 units of Novolog and administered it...
    Can I just say that I HATE the way nursing home MARS are written. You know, with the unit dose first and the dose to be administered second? When I have an admission from a nursing home, it takes me twice as long to review the meds because of that. I'm deathly afraid that I'll put the unit dose rather than the pt's dose. Like, metoprolol 25mg tab. Metoprolol 12.5 mg PO BID. Because a 25mg dose is not unusual, I wonder how often the wrong dose is administered inpatient because of the way NH MARs are written. It's scary.
  12. Visit  dudette10 profile page
    3
    Quote from HappyPepper
    I once helped a nurse giving an enema... into vagina. I was holding the patient on the other side, so I did not see where the tube was going. Only later when I leaned over to see what was going on, I was like, 'oh **** did she just put that in the wrong hole?'

    Confusing urethra and vagina is understandable, but anus and vagina??
    Confession alert!!!!

    I'll admit that a slick suppository slipped into the vagina of a patient I had. Thank goodness she had a good sense of humor and said, "Um, honey. Wrong hole." Remember, they are only about an inch away from each other, and depending on how deep you have to go between the butt cheeks while the patient is laying on her side all squished up, it can be embarrassingly easy to do!
    esperanzita, Nurse Leigh, and nrsang97 like this.
  13. Visit  monkeybug profile page
    6
    Quote from cardiacfreak

    Recently during a code the patient was in v-fib and resident was calling it PEA, wouldn't let us shock. The code leader told him it was v-fib but resident said, "He doesn't have a pulse so it's PEA." Then asked if anybody had any suggestions, we all shouted SHOCK. Someone tried to explain that you don't have a pulse with v-fib but the silly resident didn't believe us. Needless to say the patient died and the resident was reported. What is really frustrating about this is our policy changed about 2 months ago and the nurses can not administer medications or shock without an order from the resident if he/she is present. Why are we ACLS certified then? Exception is in ICU, we can shock prior to resident being present but cannot admin drugs. Can anybody say crazy.
    I hope they're prepared for a lot more deaths. That is insane. Hmm, a nurse with 20 years of experience, who's taken ACLS 10 times, or some yahoo who graduated Medical School of the Caribbean (please bring your own cadaver) exactly one month ago? Who is better equipped to make a decision? Whoever made this decision should be personally held accountable for the deaths that are inevitably going to result.
    Here.I.Stand, Nurse Leigh, TriciaJ, and 3 others like this.


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