Last names on ID badges and retaliation by patients - page 6

I am a nursing student who would like input on her school's policy on ID badges. We are currently required to display our full first and last name on our name tags at our clinical sites. I... Read More

  1. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    This had happened to our ER nurses and aides SEVERAL times ("*****, you wouldn't give me my medicine, i'm going to hunt you down" being something that sticks out in my mind). So now it's an option to put last names on badges. It took nurses getting threatened with their lives for HR to wake up and say "hey, maybe this is a problem?"
  2. by   directcare4me
    Quote from James Huffman
    Yes, I have considered that. However, while I'm hardly a feminist, I tend to assume that women -- like men -- are able to care for themselves. And I think that projecting an unafraid, confident air tends to keep the kooks at bay. (And, trust me, I am well aware of the kooks).

    I am married, and have 3 daughters (a son, too, but he's not germane to the discussion). And I encourage my wife and daughters to do what they want to do/what's important to them, and not be afraid. Obviously, this involves not doing stupid things (men should avoid those, too) but going through life afraid is no way to live. And to give you a personal example, my wife is a college professor. She's had her share of problem students, and they obviously know her name, and could find our address, but it just isn't a problem.

    One of the most encouraging (and funny, too) things I've read in a long time is the following:

    http://www.shreveporttimes.com/apps/...WS03/506150321

    They're not nurses, but I suspect they were all women. I suspect the thief will not likely want to tangle with them any time soon.

    Jim Huffman, RN

    I agree with what you've said about not going through life afraid. I don't. You also said "obviously this involves not doing stupid things"...and I very much agree with this also. I just think that for me, putting a badge with my full name on my chest or around my neck falls into that category. I respectfully acknowledge that this is not your opinion. We just see things differently.
  3. by   mattsmom81
    Patients and family members most vivid recollection of us is at a particular moment...usually when they are seeing us face to face. That's when they see that name tag and mentally capture that full name along with their feelings towards us. So..IMO it DOES help limit the opportunity for those with motive, to not be advertising the full name on a tag. Can they see the chart later??? Yes, but they will be less likely to put the name with the face then IMO.
  4. by   RN5000
    Quote from TweetiePieRN
    Totally agree with you sbic56!! You couldn't have said it better. Mr. Huffman has a pretty common name, but I don't have a common first or last name. If someone looked me up...it would be ME and not another someone with the same name.
    I fully agree. Lets face, we as nurses often have more personal and intimate, long term contact with out pts than most docs do. We also have no choice as to who we accept as a pt, and know nothing of their history. The nurse/pt relationship is not the same as nurse/doc. In my hospital we are required to wear ID with first and last name, photo as well as it must be displayed on the top right of our uniform facing forward. Im aware that if someone really want to stalk me, they can follow me, search for me etc. But why make it easy for them? If someone wants to steal my car or break into my home, they can also do that, but locking the doors, removing the keys and taking other safety precautions only makes good sense. imo...
  5. by   babynurselsa
    GO to yahoo people search and type in your name and you will not only get your address and phone number but also a map to your house.
  6. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from sbic56
    Some idiots equate the term nurse with sex object, as nurses were once almost exclusively female.

    Think about it...Nurse Huffman conjures up a sexier image than James H.

    Don't you just love stereotypes?

    Good one!

    I agree with those who don't want to be forced to put their last name on their name tag and to me it has nothing to do with being a professional nurse to have "Nurse Huffman, Registered Nurse" on your name tag - kind redundant anyway.

    I have my first name only and RN.

    It is, in my opinion, my right.

    And I live in a small town where everyone knows me because I married into one of the pioneer families here. ;-)

    steph
  7. by   mattsmom81
    I guess in a small town it makes little difference...they know ya anyway...LOL! but in the big city, you can better believe I take steps to protect myself. Too many entitled, hostile nutcases who get pizzed at the nurse and immediately eyeballs (and remembers) the full name. They just don't need to have it so readily, IMHO.
  8. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from mattsmom81
    I guess in a small town it makes little difference...they know ya anyway...LOL! but in the big city, you can better believe I take steps to protect myself. Too many entitled, hostile nutcases who get pizzed at the nurse and immediately eyeballs (and remembers) the full name. They just don't need to have it so readily, IMHO.
    I still don't put my last name on though. It is my right.

    steph
  9. by   psalm
    ...with the HIPAA in effect, we are to be careful not to give any identifying info of a patient to anyone who hasn't a "need to know", for patient confidentiality. This can be difficult when a patient has a roommate and the Pt. is HOH and we need to talk loudly. But we are to be very confidential with pt. information. While I always address my pt. first by title and last name, mrs. jones. I will ask what they prefer to be called. Sometimes it is a nickname that has nothing to do with name ie, "Dude" or "Babe", etc. AS for nurses...

    ...we have our first names, last initial and title with picture on our badges. Each pt. has a white board with the name of the nurse, aide and med nurse for their shift, using our first names only. If I help another nurse with a pt. I will say something like," Hi, I am Jackie, RN. I am giving you the pain med you requested because your RN is with another pt. now and we don't want you to have to wait." If there is another Jackie that night, I will use our last initials.

    ...having our last names on our badges didn't seem like a big deal until I worked in psych ward (which I like), and was asked are you married many times by an unstable pt. Or the time we had a prisoner on the med floor with shackles and 3 cops in attendance...one at the door at all times and 2 in the room. I had to write up one of the cops for reading the pt. chart after I had already told him the chart was off limits to him(we had the charts outside the pt. room in wallaroos).

    ...when an irate family member asks for my name, I give it as jackie A., RN. I also document the conversation and that the fam member asked for my name. Sometimes it is just to intimidate the nurse, other times it is more serious. But I agree with those who say, why make it easy for the stalkers, etc.
  10. by   ICRN2008
    Quote from directcare4me
    I agree with what you've said about not going through life afraid. I don't. You also said "obviously this involves not doing stupid things"...and I very much agree with this also. I just think that for me, putting a badge with my full name on my chest or around my neck falls into that category. I respectfully acknowledge that this is not your opinion. We just see things differently.
    I agree completely with this!
  11. by   Jen2
    I work in the ER and we all have our full first and last names on our badges. I am against it. The patient has a right to privacy and I believe the nurse does to. I have my last name whited out. It is not the HR Dept, or the CEO, or any other management that has to hand over a bag full of pot to the police as they are cutting the clothes off a trauma while their friends are standing in the hallway watching.
  12. by   fergus51
    The nurse by definition does not have a right to privacy. The patient has the right to complain about you or even sue you. That means they have a right to your name. You can not remain anonymous unfortunately. Whether you have to display your last name on the name tag is another issue.
  13. by   kkdrn
    I myself have had a male patient start calling me at home and work... My phone number was in my grandfather's name but the patient called every number in the book with my last name until he got me. I never persued it legally, but it was a pain until he finally quit. Thank goodness for caller ID.

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