Interns takes credit for my idea!! so unfair sometimess - page 2

and at the same time I feel great to have saved the patient Lots of time there are emergency situations at night and they have new interns covering who basically because they're new have a lot to learn still. So when my... Read More

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    Commuter and others are "right" in that it's the nature of the beast in any profession.


    However, I'll play devil's advocate here, just for fun.

    The healthcare "team" has many players. If we take an analogy such as a sports team, lets look at what happens when one player scores the winning goal: the rest of the team bum-rushes that player, lifts him or her up on their shoulders and parades them around. It doesn't matter if that teammate was the lowest ranking or the highest, he or she is going to be recognized. And if a teammate made a crucial assist in getting the ball to the right guy to score, well that teammate gets back-slaps as well.

    These kudos are part of what bonds a winning team together in pursuit of a common interest.

    I'm not saying we can make a direct analogy when it comes to the healthcare "team", but I think we'd all be better served to practice "congratulating" each other when appropriate. This "nurse as unsung hero" scripting has for so long been accepted and promoted within our ranks, that its been firmly grafted in as a core cultural norm and value. In threads like this, that norm is continually reaffirmed and indoctrinated.

    Of course I agree that "helping the patient" is all that really matters, but helping the patient is that proverbial football kicked through the uprights. Score!

    Maybe the intern in the OP's example technically kicked the ball, but without the OP holding the ball for him, well...you get the picture.

    We nurses can start with ourselves. We can congratulate eachother, and (gasp) congratulate the physicians we work alongside.

    Somewhere along the line I started making a point to commend physicians --when I noticed good catches, or excellent practice, or excellent patient care--it makes a difference. It makes a difference in how they view "the nurse" as well, I think. There have been times I've actually stopped docs in the hall to convey my respect, gratitude, and admiration for some point of excellence I've taken note of.

    It changes the nature of the relationship.
    TJ'sMOM, wooh, bbuerke, and 3 others like this.

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  2. 5
    Oh, yes, great idea! When I was a new grad in a PACU we decided to see if we could do some behavior mod on some of the anesthesiologists. Got a packet of gold notarial seals-- you know, the big round gold foil ones with about a hundred points around the edge, cheapcheap at the stationery store. Every time one of them did something really good, we'd say, "Hold it right there!" and run and get one and slap it on his/her scrub top. Soon we had no more antecubital IVs in kids, more gentle transfers, better reports ... and coffee and doughnuts getting delivered. We heard that some of them were saving their scrub tops to wear the next day so they could show off their gold stars.

    Then the surgeons started to want them, hinting broadly, like, "Wasn't that a good thing I did?"

    What's not to love?
    Esme12, PMFB-RN, wooh, and 2 others like this.
  3. 2
    Quote from GrnTea
    Oh, yes, great idea! When I was a new grad in a PACU we decided to see if we could do some behavior mod on some of the anesthesiologists. Got a packet of gold notarial seals-- you know, the big round gold foil ones with about a hundred points around the edge, cheapcheap at the stationery store. Every time one of them did something really good, we'd say, "Hold it right there!" and run and get one and slap it on his/her scrub top. Soon we had no more antecubital IVs in kids, more gentle transfers, better reports ... and coffee and doughnuts getting delivered. We heard that some of them were saving their scrub tops to wear the next day so they could show off their gold stars.

    Then the surgeons started to want them, hinting broadly, like, "Wasn't that a good thing I did?"

    What's not to love?

    Ha! Love it.

    I think we often fail to recognize that most physicians really do care what the nurses think of them not only as people, but as providers. A little recognition goes a long way in promoting mutual valuation.
    wooh and GrnTea like this.
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    Quote from Guttercat
    I think we often fail to recognize that most physicians really do care what the nurses think of them not only as people, but as providers. A little recognition goes a long way in promoting mutual valuation.
    This ...
    libbyliberal likes this.
  5. 2
    If you remember back to your early days on the floor, there were probably many times someone else gave you guidance. And, more than likely, your head was spinning so furiously you never recognized that someone saved your butt. This is simply the nature of people transitioning into jobs and learning from those who learned before us. Today you're the student, tomorrow you're the teacher.

    When people allow their egos to get in the way and require recognition for their contributions, it usually reflects poorly upon them. You'll gain more respect and form more positive relationships if you help others without expectation of gratitude or recognition. In the end, that quality will serve you best.
    TJ'sMOM and libbyliberal like this.
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    Why do you care? Are you feeling unappreciated at work?
  7. 0
    A good doctor will acknowledge when your input has helped a patient. We have a few I work with who will acknowledge and thank us for our work. The intern is learning, doesn't want to admit that they needed your help and I understand where that comes from. But what he'll get out of this is a lesson that YOU taught him and I bet next time he will remember how your suggestions helped the patient.

    So maybe he won't ever thank you, but you can take something out of the notion that your experience has made a difference.
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    you might not get immediate recognition, but more importantly that intern will learn to RESPECT nurses in their future practices... so thank you!!!!...
    TJ'sMOM, wooh, and libbyliberal like this.
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    When I was a younger nurse it used to bother me a bit, but nowadays I know they know, and I know the attending knows, and we all just know. You know?

    The fact that he took your advice shows that he has some respect for your experience and your opinions. Besides, i haven't met an intern yet who would ever say, "The nurse told me to do xyz and so I did it."
    TJ'sMOM, wooh, and MerryMoonDancer like this.
  10. 1
    If I had a dime for every time this has happened to me, I could buy something off the $ menu at McDonalds. Performance evaluations are a good time to stand your ground & get the acknowledgement for your contributions. I learned the hard way that people are not shy about taking credit for your hard work or your ideas.
    wooh likes this.


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