Dear Boss - page 3

by mindlor 5,448 Views | 36 Comments

Do you think that a cavelier, punitive attitude is a good thing? Do you think the constant short staffing goes un-noticed? Do you wonder why there is a mass exodus of long term, great employees? To the CEO....do you think... Read More


  1. 8
    Problem I find is that we have nurses who get their masters right out of school has no exp,then they become nurse educators and so called leaders in the profession. They get leadership roles. So they join and become the excutives of the nursing associations like ANA and such and then become policy makers,some of these nurses have never been on the floor except in their training. Now they are given the wheel of the profession. They have no idea of working under pressure,dealing with the pts and family members,or shor staffing. They have no true knowledge of acuity. The CEOs and hosp admin love these folks because they wear the corp hats and throw away thier nursing caps. It seems that the greatest advancement for a nurse is a position that takes them away from nursing practice.I have often thought the best way to run a unit was to have a clinical nurse leader, and then have a person with a business degree to run the budget portion. Let nurses nurse...... just saying
    sharonp30, Woodenpug, teeniebert, and 5 others like this.
  2. 0
    Dnnc52 I totally agree with you.
  3. 3
    Mr. Np nailed it. Nurses are their own worst enemy. If they would quit back biting and come together they would have power.
  4. 1
    I want a talented writer/nurse to write a Screenplay about the reality of 21st Century Nursing. I would wait in line and pay lots of money to see that play on Broadway. Audience members would think, "It can't be that bad," while crying and laughing. What should the name of the play be?
    anotherone likes this.
  5. 5
    Quote from CrunchRN
    Nurses are their own worst enemy. If they would quit back biting and come together they would have power.
    But only by coming together... an individual nurse has no power. This is no different than an individual cop, teacher, firefighter, machinist, pilot, etc.

    What bestows power is the willingness to act in concert and to negotiate collectively.

    And yet, how many nurses have been supporting the systematic dismantling of labor rights and collective bargaining?

    I've several times taken jobs which sucked in many of the same regards as described forthwith. I've been asked, "Why are you doing it? Why don't you just leave?" Well, in order to keep food on the table, a person will do nigh anything and if that's all you've got, you're in no position to stand up for change since an individual can usually be easily replaced.

    Please recognize, this is not a 'nursing' issue, this is a 'labor' issue.
    anotherone, Stcroix, somenurse, and 2 others like this.
  6. 10
    Nursaig,
    I am not weak. I am in need of a paycheck. OHhhh, how i'd love to "walk" out when i've been overloaded,
    but, that is seen as abandonment,
    and grounds for dismissal.

    then, i could scrap around for another job, all the while explaining why i just got fired ("I didn't feel my assignment was safe, so i went home.")
    and see who all might want to hire me....wow, would i ever feel so "strong" while i dug in the sofa for quarters...yeah, strong indeed.

    btw,
    if one wants strength,
    it's not balls they need. Those things are super tender, have to be handled just so. One punch or pinch, the owner doubles over.
    Nah, if it's strength you want, try a vagina. Now THOSE can really take a pounding.




    (hope i don't get banned, seems to me, those are medical words...)
    Lucky0220, Hoozdo, Carrollrn, and 7 others like this.
  7. 6
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    But only by coming together... an individual nurse has no power. This is no different than an individual cop, teacher, firefighter, machinist, pilot, etc.

    What bestows power is the willingness to act in concert and to negotiate collectively.

    And yet, how many nurses have been supporting the systematic dismantling of labor rights and collective bargaining?

    I've several times taken jobs which sucked in many of the same regards as described forthwith. I've been asked, "Why are you doing it? Why don't you just leave?" Well, in order to keep food on the table, a person will do nigh anything and if that's all you've got, you're in no position to stand up for change since an individual can usually be easily replaced.

    Please recognize, this is not a 'nursing' issue, this is a 'labor' issue.

    nailed it. Stands up and applauds this here post..

    also, many nurses are parents.

    there's not a lot i wouldn't do to feed my kids. It might be easier to say, "oh, i'd walk"
    If one has a big stash of savings,
    other ways to support themselves,
    lives with their parents or a wealthy mate,
    lives in a town with lots of hospitals, HH agencies, LTC facilities, and clinics and hospice orgs,
    that aren't all melded into one (1) org yet, (same HR dept that just fired you...see?)
    or lives so so cheaply, they can go a few weeks or months without a paycheck,
    or lives in an area with an actual, bonafide nursing shortage,
    that person
    might have options some parent with a table full of hungry kids doesn't have.
    Last edit by somenurse on Jan 4, '13
  8. 2
    "btw,
    if one wants strength,
    it's not balls they need. Those things are super tender, have to be handled just so. One punch or pinch, the owner doubles over.
    Nah, if it's strength you want, try a vagina. Now THOSE can really take a pounding
    ."

    This is a quote from Betty White's appearance on SNL.


    somenurse and kalevra like this.
  9. 3
    Quote from Jean Marie46514
    nailed it. Stands up and applauds this here post..

    also, many nurses are parents.

    there's not a lot i wouldn't do to feed my kids. It might be easier to say, "oh, i'd walk"
    If one has a big stash of savings,
    other ways to support themselves,
    lives with their parents or a wealthy mate,
    lives in a town with lots of hospitals, HH agencies, LTC facilities, and clinics and hospice orgs,
    that aren't all melded into one (1) org yet, (same HR dept that just fired you...see?)
    or lives so so cheaply, they can go a few weeks or months without a paycheck,
    or lives in an area with an actual, bonafide nursing shortage,
    that person
    might have options some parent with a table full of hungry kids doesn't have.
    Options, the organization of health care providers into one has certainly limited the nurses options. Imagine,IF you get fired in one hospital, you have to move out of state to find another job! Remind me how this got started? I don't understand how this ever became legal. It limist Patient choices too. I worked in one health facility where a patient was accused of being violent. He verbally threatened a social worker. He was forced to leave and seek services at a goverment funded county hospital. Later, the social worker from the goverment or county hospital called trying to place the patient in another facility. I said, good luck, 95% of the facilities providing the service the patient requires, are part of the organization that just "kicked" the patient out. So yes, it's not good for nurses, but who in the world thought, that organization of health care providers, was good for patients?
    somenurse, teeniebert, and kalevra like this.
  10. 0
    That's GREAT!!!


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