Dating Patients - page 4

Anyone here ever date/go out/marry a patient. I personally have never done it, but have seen it happen....i recall one time a male nurse dated a patients daughter...We got her on our floor one day... Read More

  1. by   bobnurse
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Yuck - I work in the ER and can't imagine dating my barfing, drunk, high or just completely stupid patients.
    What about after they become sober or get an education?

    Just kidding
  2. by   bobnurse
    Quote from z's playa
    On a more serious note..what is the time limit a nurse has to wait until they can date a pt? I know it sounds like a wierd question..I'm not in it for the dates..I swear...here we were told one year but that seems a bit extreme.
    I looked in at our nursing standards of practice, and nursing practice act and its not referenced anywhere.......Im sure its in some form if you have a complaint, but not actually referenced anywhere
  3. by   stkates
    I have seen this happen so many times! When I was an oncology nurse, a former patient's husband was married to our unit's CNS within 2 months of the patient's death. Evidently, they had become close throughout the 2 years of visits for treatment for the patient's cancer.

    When I was a hospice nurse, a coworker dated a patient's spouse after said patient's death. Apparently, it was the patient's wish that the two of them get together. It was also the patient's wish that all her clothing was bequeathed to my coworker after her death as well.

    I once worked with an ANP who was married to the spouse of a former patient (now deceased). Once again, they met during the course of visits to the clinic for treatment.

    People, this is wrong. I know that all of the above situations took place in emotionally charged environments, but what environment isn't? After the fireworks subside, there is always time for critical reflection. The heart may want what it wants, but that doesn't make it okay to pursue.
  4. by   clucki
    My Mom and Dad are a nurse, patient matchup from long ago

    its kinda special
  5. by   z's playa
    Quote from stkates
    I have seen this happen so many times! When I was an oncology nurse, a former patient's husband was married to our unit's CNS within 2 months of the patient's death. Evidently, they had become close throughout the 2 years of visits for treatment for the patient's cancer.

    When I was a hospice nurse, a coworker dated a patient's spouse after said patient's death. Apparently, it was the patient's wish that the two of them get together. It was also the patient's wish that all her clothing was bequeathed to my coworker after her death as well.

    I once worked with an ANP who was married to the spouse of a former patient (now deceased). Once again, they met during the course of visits to the clinic for treatment.

    People, this is wrong. I know that all of the above situations took place in emotionally charged environments, but what environment isn't? After the fireworks subside, there is always time for critical reflection. The heart may want what it wants, but that doesn't make it okay to pursue.

    Wierd for lack of a better word. Kind of creepy too!
  6. by   Still Riding
    I looked it up it was a year. a year since the last theraputic interaction for the pt their spouse and children.

    ONLY in certain situations I think it is ok to dat e a pt. consider this. A nice male comes into the ER to have a minor treatment ie: stitches, minor break, ect.

    the interaction always remains proffessional. a year latter (the proper time frame) you run into him in the store. and he asks you out. is there anything wrong then with saying yes?
  7. by   z's playa
    Quote from Still Riding
    I looked it up it was a year. a year since the last theraputic interaction for the pt their spouse and children.

    ONLY in certain situations I think it is ok to dat e a pt. consider this. A nice male comes into the ER to have a minor treatment ie: stitches, minor break, ect.

    the interaction always remains proffessional. a year latter (the proper time frame) you run into him in the store. and he asks you out. is there anything wrong then with saying yes?
    So a year is the proper time frame...I thought I was wrong there for awhile. Maybe only here in Canada?
  8. by   bobnurse
    anyone ever here of a doc marrying a patient?
  9. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Yes. I also work with two nurses that married surgeons they met at work.
  10. by   doobiedo
    I met and married one of my patients. Our relationship did not start until he was discharged and he made the first call. Been married for 21 years. Sorry but I do not see the big deal. I had patients try to set me up with their sons prior to that...which I politely declined however if you are discrete and don't take advantage of a situation I am not sure I see what is wrong.
    When is the patient no longer a patient....my opinion is as soon as that patient leaves the hospital....so that person is 'another person on the street' (so to speak) that you just happen to meet.
  11. by   TexasNS
    I am sure this happens more often than we think.

    Prior to nursing I had a career as a Correctional Officer in a state prison. Even in that feild Nurses would have relationships with their patients. Yes the patients were inmates!!!!

    At least once a month we watched a nurse get escorted off of the grounds in handcuffs for having a relationship with a "patient" It is a felony
  12. by   z's playa
    Quote from TexasNS
    I am sure this happens more often than we think.

    Prior to nursing I had a career as a Correctional Officer in a state prison. Even in that feild Nurses would have relationships with their patients. Yes the patients were inmates!!!!

    At least once a month we watched a nurse get escorted off of the grounds in handcuffs for having a relationship with a "patient" It is a felony

    It's a felony? Holey moley.
  13. by   TexasNS
    As of 1999 in the state of Texas anyhow.

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