Question: Neonatal nurses & deliveries

  1. hey everyone
    i wanted to know whether NNPs or Neonatal Nurses are in the delivery room? or are they only in the delivery room for high risk deliveries? i would really like to witness/assist a delivery...


    Kim
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  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   prmenrs
    It depends on the set-up in that particular hospital. NICU RNs and NNPs go if there is a reason to do so, i.e., high risk.

    Are you a nrsg student? You will, in all likelihood, witness a delivery during your education.
  4. by   nurseiam
    At our place a NICU nurse can be called to any delivery. We attende all C-sections. NNp's can also be called by the nurse and they attend all mec's. And everbody goes to high risk.
  5. by   USA987
    I work in L&D...our SCN nurses attend high risk deliveries. L&D nurses or nursery attend scheduled c/sections. For a mec delivery, the pediatric hospitalist attends and L&D or nursery acts as baby nurse.
  6. by   suzanne4
    The facility that I currently work at is a pediatric hospital, so there are no deliveries at out facility. All babies that need the care are transported in with the Neonatal transport team, either via ambulance or helicopter.
  7. by   sunnysideup09
    Right now for c/s, a pediatrician and neonatal nurse are present. If mec is present at any time(vag or c/s) a NNP and a NICU nurse is there. We are going to change though.....for low risk deliveries, including scheduled c/s, only a NICU nurse will be present. For low risk vag deliveries, the OB nurse who is the baby advocate will be there (current practice)

    Our NNPs will still attend all deliveries < 35 weeks and mec deliveries.
    The peds doc will be taken out of the picture since they are getting behind in the clinic when they attend deliveries.

    Christine, RNC, BSN

    Quote from babycheekz420
    hey everyone
    i wanted to know whether NNPs or Neonatal Nurses are in the delivery room? or are they only in the delivery room for high risk deliveries? i would really like to witness/assist a delivery...


    Kim
  8. by   SteveNNP
    Hey,

    At our hospital, we end up going to about 4-5 deliveries each 12 hour shift. [though we have had none, or 15] Nicu nurses go to all C/S, all deliveries<35 wks, all mecs, all suspected cord compressions,amnionitis', variable decels, etc. We do not use NNP's. Our hospital decided to get rid of them, and just provide advanced training to their NICU RN's. We all rotate taking 1st, 2nd, 3rd + admit, going to each delivery until we get an admit. Keeps our skills up, that's for sure!
  9. by   sunnysideup09
    At what point do your MDs attend the delivery?

    Christine, RNC, BSN

    Quote from SteveRN21
    Hey,

    At our hospital, we end up going to about 4-5 deliveries each 12 hour shift. [though we have had none, or 15] Nicu nurses go to all C/S, all deliveries<35 wks, all mecs, all suspected cord compressions,amnionitis', variable decels, etc. We do not use NNP's. Our hospital decided to get rid of them, and just provide advanced training to their NICU RN's. We all rotate taking 1st, 2nd, 3rd + admit, going to each delivery until we get an admit. Keeps our skills up, that's for sure!
  10. by   Jolie
    When I worked in a teaching hospital, the ped residents attended all the high risk deliveries.

    In the community setting, it seems much more common for NICU nurses to attend, either alone or with an NNP/MD.

    I loved doing deliveries. It was my favorite part of my job!
  11. by   Gompers
    Wow, every hospital seems to do something different!

    I can't imagine not going to a delivery without a doc, ever. We actually have THREE docs at every C-section or high risk delivery. Our NICU team includes a nurse, a neonatal respiratory therapist, a resident, and either a neonatal fellow or attending. Once in the delivery room, we are joined by the pediatric resident that is covering the newborn nursery that shift.

    We probably get an average of 2-3 high risk deliveries a shift.

    One more thing - when you work in the NICU and go down for a delivery, you don't assist with the delivery at all - you stand by the warmer bed and make sure all the newborn recussitation equiptment is ready for when the baby comes out.
  12. by   dawngloves
    I wish they would cut down on the deliveries we go to, all with docs. Obviously the high risk deliveries. But all c/s, all forcepts, suction,shoulder distocia, thin mec, thick mec, maternal temp......gaaaaa!!!!!!!
  13. by   Sweden
    Quote from dawngloves
    I wish they would cut down on the deliveries we go to, all with docs. Obviously the high risk deliveries. But all c/s, all forcepts, suction,shoulder distocia, thin mec, thick mec, maternal temp......gaaaaa!!!!!!!
    In my hospital we (nicu nurse and doctor) only attend deliveries <32 weeks (c-section or vaginal delivery) and if theres a known problem (usually surgical disorders) with the baby. We dont attend c/s routinely not even the emergency ones. They (primary physician and midwife) do a first assessment and call us if the baby is doing poorly and they need help.......

    Anna
  14. by   SteveNNP
    Quote from nicumom75
    At what point do your MDs attend the delivery?

    Christine, RNC, BSN
    If we know a smaller preemie is coming, eg a <32 weeker, multiples, or if we have a transport. I work nights, so we don't have an MD on all the time. They usually come in to write orders, or will have us call them at home when mom dilates to 8cm. On days, they're always there, and will attend when they feel the need to, especially with the really small ones. Once the kid is born, the admitting nurse starts the standard order protocol based on weight, age, etc, other RN's assist with weighing, assessing, documenting, coding... resource nurses put in umbilical lines, the RT's set up vents and settings, give infasurf, so the MD pretty much just has to decide if they want to actually see the pt then, or give phone orders and see them in the am. We have a great team that works together really well, as you can see...
    It takes a lot of trust for the MD's to let the nurses handle all this, which we've earned over the years.........

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