Nurses in trouble get second chances - Minnesota - page 4

by brian Admin

Minnesota State regulators say they protect the public with a closer watch on caregivers accused of misconduct. Those who lost loved ones want them to do more. Elda Bothun lay unconscious on her bed inside a Bloomington... Read More


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    These nurses failed to respond to a patient who was having an acute MI which resulted in death. That is a sentinel event and they should have their licenses pulled. I could see making a mistake and being disciplined for it. I mean, we're all human and prone to error from time to time. However, they cost this person her LIFE. They do not deserve to continue to practice. What if it was your mom that gets them after they've been disciplined and not had their licenses pulled and the same thing occurs? Would you want them to be able to retain their license?? The punishment needs to fit the crime.
    spurs21550 likes this.
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    Just because some medical professionals are foreign, doesn't mean a damn thing, and that did not make the difference. I have worked with a huge variety of foreign nurses and doctors and they are very good at what they do. So, are you saying that if you went to be a nurse in another country and something like this happened during your care that it's because your foreign?? I don't think so. People need to look at both sides of the pic when it comes to stuff like this.
    RNInterupted likes this.
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    Even with a DNR order, they should have done something. DNR does not mean DO NOT TREAT.
    RNInterupted likes this.
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    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    I'm the DNS of a nursing home. I hire RNs only. If they don't have experience, their orientation is at least 6 weeks long. If they have nursing experience, but none in a nursing home, tHeir orientation is a month. I work with some of the smartest nurses I've ever met and since I've been an RN for more than 30 years, I can say that without hesitation. Some of the stupidest nurses I know work in the hospital. Let's not paint an entire industry with a broad brush because of these bad nurses.
    Wished I'm had come and worked for you. I was just licensed in June, got my first real nursing job in August at a nursing home. Put in my 2 week notice 4 weeks later. I was given 6 days orientation total, 3 on the floor. Given 19 patients my first day out and 3 days later when it was noted that I could slam all the meds down them without being 2 hours late, I was given 29. I lasted 6 weeks and it was about 5 1/2 weeks too long. I think I'll look for something in the hospital now, I figure I can handle 10 patients without too much issue.

    Also, the second day that I worked, I had one patient with a O2 stat of 83. Really, did she get like that overnight, No, she had been like that for quite a while. I called her Dr and he sent her to the ED. She was vented for 10 days in ICU. I guess having 29 patients doesn't do much for assessing their breathing.
  5. 0
    I heard from a friend in long term facilities that there are 2 nurses. 1 Registered Nurse and 1 Licensed Practical nurse for 40-60 patients requiring long term care. And I am sure these patients have more than 1 diagnoses so the nurses must have a broad range of knowledge in respective specialties. And at the same time the patients usually have to be stable to be able to enter a long term care facility. That's the problem with LTC, there aren't enough nurses for that many patients and they should always have a more senior nurse on who knows what to do to guide the new nurses. But, nurses eat their young. We eat them we eat them we eat them and I don't understand why. There's too much drama in nursing.

    I want to know what the patients code status was. Can we resuscitate the patient? or is it just comfort care, are we just comforting them until they are ready to pass away?

    But it sounds like the nurses didn't even take time to assess the situation/patient before leaving the room just to make sure things are safe. Sounds like a case of neglect.
  6. 1
    It seems to me that the laws governing nursing practice should be uniform from state to state, just like our licensing exam. A nurse should not be able to get away with behavior in one state that would cost them their license in another.

    Heck, where I live, a nurse can lose their license for smoking marijuana (and that's OFF the job), and I know one LPN personally who lost hers for doing a sharp debridement on a diabetic ulcer. Which was a TERRIBLE thing to do when she was not trained or licensed for that....but she didn't get a second chance, let alone a fourth or a fifth!
    sapphire18 likes this.
  7. 2
    Quote from Studentray
    There's too much drama in nursing.
    If so, it's often caused by things like jumping to conclusions based on a couple sentences. Like deciding:
    But it sounds like the nurses didn't even take time to assess the situation/patient before leaving the room just to make sure things are safe. Sounds like a case of neglect.
    If you think "nurses eat their young" then perhaps you should start changing that by not jumping to conclusions and making assumptions about a situation based on a couple sentences in a newspaper article.
    applewhitern and noc4senuf like this.
  8. 0
    I have no idea why nurses would be expected to know how to react to an emergency. Nursing schools provide no training in dealing with emergencies.
    Knowing how to respond in various emergencies is something learned on the job in acute care environments.
  9. 1
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    I have no idea why nurses would be expected to know how to react to an emergency. Nursing schools provide no training in dealing with emergencies. Knowing how to respond in various emergencies is something learned on the job in acute care environments.
    Most environments, even outside of acute care, EXPECT nurses to know BLS and first aid...you should have SOME knowledge on how to respond to a emergency, especially if you need to do CPR-at least compressions on a pt who has a pacemaker.
    RNInterupted likes this.
  10. 0
    As a DON who previously worked at homes in MN, I reported my fair share of nurses to the BON. Only one nurse ever lost her license for my report and that was due to stealing narcs. Two nurses were identified (and proven) of not giving a tube feeder their meds consistently over a period of months. One nurse who had taken off a month and hospitalized for a mental breakdown (not told to management), came back to work and a week later during her shift did not pass any meds, did no charting, called other floors for help (she had 14 residents), upset residents with her behavior that some discharged the following day and the BON did nothing with any of these. All were fired from the facility. This is just a small example. BUT, on the otherhand, if a nurse is delinquent on her taxes or has a disorderly conduct, the license is suspended. Just no common sense with the BON in MN.

    In the meantime, now that I travel adn do consulting and temp DON work, I get to see what goes on outside the area. In Kentucky, a nurse is sitting in prison for 9 years for manslaughter. He was told a coupel times by a CNA that a resident had achange of condition. He did not go check the resdident until a couple of hours later. The resident was a Full Code on a rehab unit. WHen he finally went to check, the resident had expired. He did not do CPR. he later stated as his excuse was that the resident was old. Go figure.


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