do any of you like codes?? - page 4

i have a confession...i like codes, ok, i love codes. i don't like that i like them, because, i know it means a human being is in big trouble. but my heart gets pumping, pin point pupils,... Read More

  1. by   GoldenLove
    I was also an EMT before I became a nurse...so I worked lots of codes and also in Emergency for a year. I absolutely hate codes especially when working with children....my heart is too sensitive...you of course spring into action and adrenaline takes over...but once it is all over...I have to admit...I am a mess!! Takes me a few to compose myself...
  2. by   Predaking
    Psss...codes. The doctors and RN's hog all the glory of reviving a crashing patient. The only thing I can do as an LVN is grab the stupid crash cart(after determining their code status of course), maybe place the CPR board on the pt's back, and set up oxygen/ambu bags. I've never even had the chance to do chest compressions on any patients. I've recorded(time of code, meds given, etc) a code event though *lol*

    It's funny having all these CPR and EMT certs and not having the chance to use them.
  3. by   blueheaven
    Face it, some of us are adrenalin junkies!!!
  4. by   blueheaven
    Quote from Predaking
    Psss...codes. The doctors and RN's hog all the glory of reviving a crashing patient. The only thing I can do as an LVN is grab the stupid crash cart(after determining their code status of course), maybe place the CPR board on the pt's back, and set up oxygen/ambu bags. I've never even had the chance to do chest compressions on any patients. I've recorded(time of code, meds given, etc) a code event though *lol*

    It's funny having all these CPR and EMT certs and not having the chance to use them.
    "glory" of reviving a patient? You know that a lot codes don't walk out of the hospital. You perform a very vital part of the code team!!! What would happen if you DIDN'T get the cart, get the ambu bag, O2 etc. Personally, I would be very thankful to have you as part of the "team". You would not believe how many times I've went to codes out on a regular med-surg floor and the floor nurses are not responding quickly enough, or disappear when the ICU nurse and residents show up. That usually leaves me or another ICU nurse setting up all the equipment. You can work with me anytime!!
  5. by   jbtampa
    geesh. as a respiratory therapist I am expected to show up and go full steam, maintain airway with intubation if required per protocol, and personally I would a whole lot rather hang at the door and watch someone else sweat. No glory at bedside for me. I remember my first code. it was me and the cna. I yelled over to her "go get the cart and call a code". blankness stared back. I again suggested some haste in her step. blank. so I continued alone. got a mouth full of food and a denture. nice. she came back, which actually rarely occurs in a SNF. she shipped out 911 and when she returned a few days later she had no memory of any of it, including where she last checked her teeth. ha, yes, the glory.
  6. by   gradcare
    Personally I prefere the "peri-code" to the code and the satisfaction that comes with preventing the code in the first place (when able). I have come to terms that for me to have "a great day" (which for me means being tested both mentally and physically including the mental gymnastics required to get to the cause of the deterioration in condition and find a solution) someone else has to be having a real bad day.
  7. by   ZippyGBR
    resuscitation (whether trauma or medical , whether or not it gets to pounding on chests ) is a buzz , yes it is odd knowing that someone has to have had have a major boo-boo to be in that state but the basic biochemical fight or flight stuff means that resus will give you a buzz
  8. by   teeituptom
    love codes
    code blues
    code yellows
    code browns
    code reds
    code pinks
    code mauve
    codes in general
  9. by   a21chdchic
    I don't like codes. I've seen many people die in codes, and that never should have been coded in the first place. It's a shame that we live in a culture that is so 'sue-happy'. Codes take place because we have to cover our a****. There are people out there who benefit from being coded, but there are so many more out there who don't. How many old people have you had to code that when you did CPR you broke their ribs? Then, if they survive, you see them suffer for a few days vented, or are in a vegetative state (from anoxia), or with many different disease states where they have no quality of life, and then they die anyway, or their family decides to have them removed from the vent? Or worse yet have them to live a few years longer with 24 hour care with frequent visits to the hospital. As a society, we need to be more proactive in educating the public in advanced directives, so more people can die with dignity. Personally, I would not want to see another family member be coded (I seen my uncle/Godfather coded). My last memory of him was with tubes coming out of every orifice. It is very common these days for family members to be allowed to come in and watch codes. This is a practice that I don't see alot of benefits arising from.
    My hat is off to those of you who thrive on the adrenaline rush of a code, it takes a diverse bunch of us to balance each others activities. I'm quite happy as a Hospice RN and can ease the pain and suffering of those who are dying rather than prolong their deaths and make it more difficult for them.

    Ana
  10. by   dskrninpa
    I'm not a big fan of codes, fortunately we don't have nearly as many as we could, or maybe should on our floor. I used to dread them before I got my ACLS, now I feel comfortable with them. Unless it's someone who really is being kept alive and is really in pain or has no quality of life I hate the idea that people who code don't come out the same for the most part.
  11. by   heartrn35
    I used to love codes, wanted to be part of the code team, wanted to do compressions, push drugs, zap the crap out of people. LOVED THE RUSH.
    Ten plus years later I still enjoy the rush, not nearly as much but the enjoyment is still there, but I enjoy calm days as well. I also really enjoy preventing the code. In ICU you can focus your attention on a few patients and catch things that might be missed elsewhere.
  12. by   NeuroNP
    Quote from ryanfocker
    i have a confession...i like codes, ok, i love codes.

    i don't like that i like them, because, i know it means a human being is in big trouble. but my heart gets pumping, pin point pupils, adrenaline racing, my entire being focuses intesely on the moment....just thinking about it gets me excited.

    even when they are over, the after glow keeps me going for hours. sometimes when the floor gets slow, i "almost" want a code.

    my moral compass tells me this is wrong. i should not "want" a human to code. but i know they will, and the hospital is the safest place on earth for it to happen, and i want to be there when it happens.

    does any body else feel this way??
    i should also point out....i get very anxious and nervous when pt's expire. and aftercare makes me shake for about a day or two. i don't like death.

    any meaningful comment would be appreciated.
    I agree, it seems wrong somehow to like them, but I think people have hit the nail on the head, it's a chance to do what you've really trained for. I was a tech in the ED of a Level I Trauma center before nursing school and I used to LOVE a good trauma resus. It seemed really morbid to me until someone explained it like this.

    People code, people get hurt bad. I'm not wishing it to happen to anyone, I'm just wishing that WHEN it happens, it's on my shift. :-)
  13. by   mummer43
    A patient I was taking care of today coded. He was post CABG and there was no time to get back to the OR, so the doc opened the chest up in the room. It was my first open chest code and I was damn scared. I was kind of pushed out of the way by the more experienced nurses, which was fine with me. I'm sure I'll get my chance to really get my hands dirty in a code situation, but I can tell you it's not something I hope for.

    I do, however, hope that I am prepared enough to handle it when the situation does arise.

close