Content That ThePrincessBride Likes

Content That ThePrincessBride Likes

ThePrincessBride, BSN, RN 35,613 Views

Joined Jun 13, '10 - from 'Somewhere'. She has '1 RN, 3 tech' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Med-Surg, NICU'. Posts: 1,953 (60% Liked) Likes: 5,149

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  • Jul 28

    Quote from gilversplace
    Not every state pays good like California, here in the south starting for nurses are bottom $20s. I even heard few years ago below 20 for no experience
    California pay is actually not that great when compared with their cost of living. My house cost $120,000 here in Texas. A similar house in California would cost well over $500,000. Yes in the south our hourly wages are lower across the board, but our cost of living is significantly less.

  • Jul 28

    While it is unfair in the beginning, you need to keep in mind businesses will not lost money. One of two things will happen... They will push the cost of labor onto the consumer by increasing the cost of the goods... Or they will replace as much minimum wagers as possible, say hello to more self check out lanes, and touch screen ordering at food places. I'll be honest Id be a little insulted if minimum wage went up to 15.00 and I am still at 23.00... I worked hard for that degree and spent a lot of money to get there. Now to see people that may not aspire to be much else will have it easier? Hell what's stopping nurses from taking a pay cut and having less responsibility? Personally, in areas where the 15.00 would put them close to nursing don't be shocked to see an even worse nursing shortage.

  • Jul 19

    I read somewhere that "there is more physiological difference between a 25 weeker and a full term baby than there is between a 3-year-old and an adult." I believe it.

    NICU nurses are preemie experts and can also take care of full term infants having problems with the transition to extra-uterine life. But they are not experts in the care of older babies/children. PICU nurses are experts in the care of children (including full term babies with problems not directly related to transition).

    Also, the historical development of NICU's and PICU's are totally different -- with PICU's following more or less the same pathways as adult ICU's and NICU's being different. (NICU's were established by nurses over 100 years ago to provide nursing care back in the days when doctors had little to offer preemies. They were nursing focused. Doctors were not even allowed to enter some NICUs. Parents weren't either.)

    I agree with the posters above.

    llg -- old, former NICU nurse with a special interest in nursing history and culture

  • Jul 19

    There are only a small number of typical patient problems seen in NICUs. Their patients are all very small, their focus is much narrower and they're even more OCD than most ICU nurses. That's only my observation; my PICU recovers neonates post cardiac surgery and once they're stable we send them back to NICU so I have a bit of background there. I've also worked in both areas. For example, a while back we took a babe from our NICU who was critically ill and was likely going to require ECMO. The baby was slightly premature and slightly LBW. We had a limited number of options as to which bed we admitted the baby to due to the potential for needing to have room for an ECMO circuit, probably a CRRT circuit, ventilator, 20+ IV pumps, 2 staff members and all the rest of the accoutrements this baby was likely to need. The NICU staff were appalled with where the baby was situated on the unit because we weren't going to be able to provide developmentally-supportive care (minimal handling, dark environment, minimal noise, flexed and supported position etc). Our concern was keeping the baby alive. We failed.

    Most PICU patients have more in common with adult ICU patients than they do with NICU patients. We use a lot of the same drugs (although doses are very different), we see a lot of the same reasons for admission, we have a lot of the same equipment and our focus is always life over limb. Between peds and adults, critical care is critical care. So nurses who have experience in adult critical care come with a lot of very essential skills; their knowledge gaps are straight-forward - norms for vital signs, typical drug doses, growth-and-development and family-centered care. NICU is a very specific and relatively narrow specialty. PICU nurses have the broadest scope of practice of any nurse out there; I wouldn't hesitate to say it's broader even than ED nursing. That's what informs my opinion.

  • Jul 18

    Quote from Nurse3242
    How long would you suggest waiting before making the big switch to PICU nursing? I currently work in an adult ICU, and have been there for six months. It is my first job as a nurse. I love my job and am so grateful for it, but would love to eventually make my way into a children's ICU. I feel that that is where I would ultimately like to be. I feel I have so much to learn where I'm at, but it's easy for me to wish for the days when I will be in a pediatric setting and was wondering how long y'all would suggest someone is a nurse before moving into such an acute setting with such critical children.
    Also, do you have any advice for a nurse aspiring to someday move into pediatric critical care? What is one thing you wish you had known?
    The only way to guarantee that you won't get a PICU job is to not apply. They may want 1-2 yrs experience but there is no harm applying. I would start now.

  • Jul 18

    Don't work doubles, problem solved.

  • Jul 18

    Oh my OP. You have lots to learn based on all your posts. Take it one step at a time. You made into school. Focus on passing that. Then NCLEX. Then finding a job. Then, your social life.

  • Jul 13

    Quote from NotAllWhoWandeRN
    *gasps*

    *faints*
    We need a nurse over here! A cheap one! Anybody??

  • Jul 13

    I entered this profession because I understood that it paid well and employment was never going to be an issue. Pay is very important to me because I want to be well off. If you don't care about the money, that's fine. I only ask that you send any disposable income my way.

  • Jul 13

    I said it before, and I'll say it again...the people who go into this with that so-called 'true calling' from a higher power are going to surely be disappointed. No, money isn't everything but it sure plays a very large role. And as many have stated, it is not mutually exclusive from the care and compassion we provide to every single patient. This is such a fallacy from people who are unfamiliar with the system. Just because I don't warm your coffee (because I'm a little busy doing something else, like saving a life) does not make me a callus person.

  • Jul 13

    some days when i see some really CRAZY ish, the first thing that comes to mind it is i do NOT get paid enough for this!!!

  • Jul 13

    I did not take an oath, and I did not go into nursing for altruistic reasons. I wanted to make good money with a 2 year degree.

    "is that why we can't get too much work cause majority of the hospital / nursing facility is out of budget"???? The reason nurses have trouble finding work is because corporate healthcare has ignored safe staffing ratios .. in order to boost their bottom line. More patients per nurse equals less need for nurses. Where are ethics when the fat cats at the top continue to rake in outrageous salaries and bonuses, while the nurses are stretched thinner?

  • Jul 13

    To be blunt, I wouldn't report to work if I didn't receive pay for the services I render. Money is important since it rules everything around us. I don't work for free.

    'Compassion' will not pay for the roof over my head. 'Concern' will not pay for the food in my refrigerator. 'Caring' will not pay for life's basic necessities.

  • Jul 12

    Definitely start saving for retirement.

  • Jul 12

    Not at all. I don't think I've ever purchased anything one would consider a "luxury" item. I spend most of my money on travel.


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