Content That ThePrincessBride Likes

Content That ThePrincessBride Likes

ThePrincessBride, BSN, RN 33,313 Views

Joined Jun 13, '10 - from 'Somewhere'. She has '1 RN, 3 tech' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Med-Surg, NICU'. Posts: 1,909 (59% Liked) Likes: 4,995

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  • May 4

    Quote from jasy
    you dont need rigorous education to do that job, because crnas dont do anything without anesthesiologists, guess you didnt read my post or you didnt understand it
    Apparently, you seem to think all anesthesia practices operate the same as yours does universally.

    CRNAs are often solo providers, especially in rural settings, and are fully capable of functioning independently without an MDA. They can do everything without the anesthesiologist and are fully trained for it.

  • May 4

    If one has multiple degrees in the same area, only the highest need be listed. If there are other degrees in other area, those should be listed separately. My Oncologist is listed as "MD, MPH." Many doctors are "MD, PhD." I had a professor in college who had a PhD in nursing but also an MPH. She didn't list her MSN degree because she had the PhD but did list the MPH because it was a non-nursing degree. I also know many nurses who have MBAs in addition to their nursing degrees. It makes sense to list that in addition to the nursing degree because one does not imply the other. If you have an MSN, it's unnecessary to list a BSN or an ADN in addition to that.

  • May 4

    Quote from James W.
    Ah yes, grandiosity.. & titles which serve as a splendid ego flag..

    Anyone recall African dictator Idi Amin?
    & his full title, as below..

    "His Excellency, President for life, Field Marshall Al Hadji Dr Idi Amin Dada,
    VC, DSO, MC, Lord of All the Beasts of the Earth & Fishes of the Seas, &
    Conqueror of the British Empire in Africa in General & Uganda in Particular."
    No.
    But, thank you.

  • May 3

    I didn't catch how old the OP is, but I have the impression she is young.

    A younger person, not a nurse so maybe not knowledgeable about meds is given a med by her mother. We are thinking of the OP as an adult and comparing her to a nurse. She might be a non med savvy, semi-sheltered young adult living with her parents and lacking life experience. How many non nurses think drug tests are to test for street drugs? I hope this isn't the end of a dream.

  • May 3

    Quote from XNavyCorpsman
    The people that think this is just a little mistake are the ones that need to be watched very carefully when wasting medications. Just saying.
    Oh, please. Do you really not believe that large segments of the public don't "get" that it's illegal to share their medications? Families do it all the time and sincerely don't recognize they're doing anything wrong, certainly not anything illegal. The OP made a mistake, and now knows better. End of story.

    I grew up with a physician father and an RN mother, and, before I went to nursing school, I didn't realize it was illegal to take a family member's rx drugs, or that there could be any negative repercussions. I didn't recognize there was any significant difference, legally, between schedule drugs and other rx drugs. Buying drugs on the street? Definitely illegal. Your mother giving you one of her pills because she thinks it would help you? No clue. Never thought about it one way or the other.

    I was just reading your own thread about turnover and poor morale in your workplace. Is it by any chance because you go around accusing the nurses working with you of stealing drugs or not being fit to be nurses??

  • May 3

    Quote from didi768
    I hate posters like you. She has a caring heart, therefore she IS nursing material. And I'd take any bet that half the nurses out there are using themselves nowadays. Sorcery will be rampant in the end times.
    Try reading some of his other posts.... He thinks he is all high and mighty by posting ignorant statements then hides and never returns. As a nurse manager I set these people straight real quick.

  • May 3

    Quote from sallyrnrrt
    It it is against TOS to recommend, but I might sugest to me, to seek RX fom my provider
    Unless OP can somehow convince the provider to backdate the script to a date BEFORE the drug screen was done, that won't help.

    And frankly, a provider who would do that...not good in my book.

  • May 3

    Quote from XNavyCorpsman
    This may sound a little harsh, but you are NOT nursing material. You took a controlled substance without a prescription. And to top this off, your mother gave it to you.
    Oh god.... Who is this, the nursing police?

  • May 3

    Quote from XNavyCorpsman
    This may sound a little harsh, but you are NOT nursing material. You took a controlled substance without a prescription. And to top this off, your mother gave it to you.
    More than "a little." The OP made a mistake; let's not get carried away. Families share medication all the time, and most people don't realize that taking a controlled med prescribed for another family member, and shared voluntarily by that family member, is illegal. The OP's mom was trying to be helpful. I haven't heard anything yet that suggests to me that the OP is "NOT nursing material."

  • May 2

    I don't have a strong preference for either gender. I guess I have noticed younger patients, younger than age 50, are more psychologically draining because they are whiny a**holes, sometimes. It's not specific for either gender. Younger males and females can be needy. Older patients seem more resilient, probably because they've been through more in life.

  • May 2

    I have occasionally had the thought that one gender is easier than the other, but really I am just remembering a pt who is an outlier. Those particularly difficult or easy pts are more likely to be memorable. There are certain things that may make care of one gender easier than the other in certain situations. For instance, for those who don't have foleys, a urinal is a blessing. However, a female with a foley is just as convenient for me.

    Background: I work on an ortho/trauma floor, lots of pain and pain meds.

    I do have a few generalizations of course, based on my own anecdotal experiences. I think elderly people tend to deal with pain better as a whole. Younger people have not (usually) experienced chronic aches and pains that tend to come with old age and are therefore shocked and less able to cope with it. A LOL with a hip fx is often easier to take care of than a 20 something with a fx from a car accident.

    The people who are challenging are those who expect no pain after being medicated and those who refuse to tell you they are in pain. Oh yes, and those who are just GREAT until their spouse comes in and suddenly they are a 10/10. Some of my easiest/nicest pts have been those people who I would actively avoid outside of work, such as heroin addicts. I have even had great nurses and doctors as family members - I know I am not the only one who inwardly groans when you hear that in report!

    I do have of course have a favorite pt...I love my dementia patients, even the combative ones....as long as they don't try to climb out of bed




    I can't believe I actually read the phrase "internalized misogyny" on this board.

  • May 2

    Quote from Horseshoe
    Huh?!?
    That does kind of describe nursing, though.

  • May 2

    It has more to do with their personality than it does gender.

  • May 2

    You could always say "nope no monkeys here, but you could stop being a donkey"

  • May 2

    Quote from TheCommuter
    Use 'I' statements...

    "I am feeling threatened whenever you resort to name-calling..."
    "I feel a hostile environment is promoted when you refer to nurses as monkeys..."
    "I feel you are behaving in an uncivil manner when you hurl insults. Please stop."
    How about "I think you are a sphincter"?


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