Content That ThePrincessBride Likes

Content That ThePrincessBride Likes

ThePrincessBride, BSN, RN 36,972 Views

Joined Jun 13, '10 - from 'Somewhere'. She has '1 RN, 3 tech' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Med-Surg, NICU'. Posts: 1,967 (60% Liked) Likes: 5,195

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  • Sep 24

    Quote from Luv2baRNurse
    First, let's be realistic. If you are a new nurse right out of school with no experience, you probably will not be in a position to demand high pay. I live in a small town with 3 prominent hospitals and on average a brand new ER nurse commands $25-26/hr (I live in Texas); other specialties may pay more. If you're already thinking about higher pay and less stress, then are you in nursing for the right reason? Naursing [sic] is a calling, not just a job. Critical care areas such as labor & delivery, NICU, ER, ICU, Telemetry, CCU pay more, but are stressful, require skill, experience and knowledge. You'll have to earn it! Hospice, home health, rehab, prison, school nursing, office or clinic nursing, are less stressful, but not necessarily more money. You may try working in occupational health, an immunization clinic, an insurance office for a less stressful job. But if you're commanding the higher pay jobs, then get ready to work for the higher pay. Your pay will also be determined by how you decide to work: M-F 8-5; 12 hours shifts days or nights because of shift differentials and weekend differentials. Travel nursing pays well, but will require experience. Find a good preceptor program in something you think you'll enjoy (perhaps a favorite part of clinical) and gain some experience. After a year or two of experience, you can apply for travel nursing jobs, make great money, and do what you enjoy (traveling, exploring) to have the best of both worlds.
    Just. No.

    A thousand times no.

  • Sep 16

    Quote from HouTx
    For instance, PP comments about difficulty working with LV/PNs due to unequal division of labor do not reflect a 'team' concept.... where everyone is making their own contribution to the care of a group of patients. If the RN has a ton of IV meds & other RN-only things to do, he would make sure that he's not taking on any additional tasks that could be performed by other members of the team.
    We found our "teams" work best with 2 levels of staff (RN and CNA) than 3 levels (RN, LPN, and CNA). I remember team nursing with LPN's. On some units, with relatively low acuity, it can work. But as the acuity has risen in the inpatient areas, it gets increasingly difficult to pull off. There are fewer and fewer patients that the LPN's can provide much care for. We are better off with the RN/CNA combo.

  • Sep 11

    Quote from brandy1017
    I've taken care of several people with guillain barre from a flu shot, if it's so rare why have I seen it so often? FYI if you are older than 50 your risks are higher! Also Bells Palsy is linked to the flu shot as well, not as serious, but certainly physically upsetting!
    Childhood cancer is, in reality, pretty rare. Yet we saw cases of it at Duke all the time. Hundreds of them. I'd go as far as to say thousands over the course of several years.

    Know why? We had a pediatric cancer center.

    You see this stuff because you work in health care. You work where the sick people go! Also: "several people" over the course of how long? That hardly qualifies as seeing it "so often".

    I had four grandparents survive the Great Flu Epidemic of 1918. One of them was only a few months old; the other three were 14, 12, and 9. I bet they would've given anything for a flu vaccine. Two of them were in Philadelphia. Read about how the bodies were pouring into Donohue Funeral Home (ironically, the folks who have handled arrangements for that side of my family SINCE about that time!) so quickly you can see the changes in the documentation in the intake ledgers - how they went from neat to scribbles...from full detail to sex, approximate age, and date....

    Bring on the wonders of modern medicine, please.

  • Sep 11

    I had my allergist write a note saying he didn't want me getting the flu vaccine and wearing a mask would be a burden with my severe asthma. I still got told it's one or the other. I ended up getting the vaccine predmedicated with Benadryl and hydrocortisone. And I still support policies like this.

  • Sep 11

    Better than the option of get the shot or voluntarily terminate your position.

  • Sep 10

    Quote from NurseGirl525
    I can't get past he was middle-aged about 35ish. Sitting here shaking my head.
    Yea, this is the thing that jumped out at me. Guess I'm the Crypt Keeper.

  • Sep 10

    I can't get past he was middle-aged about 35ish. Sitting here shaking my head.

  • Sep 10

    Not really flirting, but caught me off guard and humorous. I was working as an EKG tech at a hospital. I had finished performing a 12 led EKG on an elderly lady. As I was removing the electrode patches (big round patches with a metal snap in the middle) the patient asks me to leave two of them on her chest. I ask her why. She stated "I had a double mastectomy when I was 26. I haven't had nipples in 60 yrs."

  • Sep 10

    About five or six years ago I was doing a head-to-toe assessment on a s/p CVA male patient in his 50s at the specialty rehab hospital where I worked at the time.

    I asked him, "Can I touch your feet? I need to assess your pulses."

    He allowed me to assess his pulses, but not before smiling while pointing to my breasts and saying, "Can I touch those?"

  • Sep 7

    Quote from cleback
    Not sure whether I should engage or not, but I do ageee that we should stop saying "respect is earned." I have seen it as a recurring theme, especially in critical care settings.

    No, admiration is earned. Respect to fellow coworkers should be an expectation for professional behavior.
    I agree. Respect should be given unconditionally - although once lost it's hard to get back.

    Treating one another like crap does nothing for the one central player: THE PATIENT.

  • Sep 7

    Quote from joanna73
    Hopefully, the moderators will soon close this thread. We do not need yet another of these discussions. It's overdone.
    This is why horizontal violence continues, despite decades of studies on the subject.

    If the OP was an older nurse who felt disrespected by her colleagues, there would be a virtual "amen corner" of responses.

  • Sep 6

    Quote from GeneralistRN
    Thanks carolina.

    It's sad that we have such hypersensitive people who take personal offense to critiques of their employers' reprehensible behaviors or their own inactions that enable their employers to get away with wage theft. Do people think so little of their profession that they want to shut down those of us who want to put an end to that exploitation? Only in nursing...
    Do people think so little of their profession, they refer back to colleagues with:
    -"there's something wrong with you if you don't feel comfortable leaving your patient "
    -"You are nasty and dirty for doing that"
    - "no one should condone what you are doing, which is enabling your employer to do something illegal, and I have no respect for you."

    If you want to "put an end to it", that's not going to do it.

  • Sep 6

    Quote from GeneralistRN
    For one thing, you're eating lunch in the unit and caring for critically ill patients at the same time? You are nasty and dirty for doing that and I strongly doubt that it is allowed.
    That's quite a statement to make about a person as a whole based on one single habit they practice at work. I'm fairly certain that the poster to which you are replying isn't standing there shoveling turkey chili in their face while inserting an IV or gnawing on a sub while titrating a drip. I think what the poster means is that they don't leave the unit or sit in the break room to eat but instead they do it at the desk. Universal precautions dictate clean hands in and out so theoretically anything "nasty and dirty" picked up while eating is going to be cleansed off prior to entering the patient's room and any germs picked up at the bedside will be removed before heading back to the nurse's station.
    I'm not saying I agree with this practice one way or the other but I do think your choice of words was poor.

  • Sep 6

    Your manager calls you at home on her personal cell phone, hoping that you won't recognize the number to plead that you come in.

  • Sep 6

    When you step onto the unit and the wild-eyed charge nurse yells, "RUN! Run while you still can!"


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