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ThePrincessBride, BSN, RN 38,871 Views

Joined Jun 13, '10 - from 'Somewhere'. She has '1 RN, 3 tech' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Med-Surg, NICU'. Posts: 1,997 (60% Liked) Likes: 5,272

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  • 4:57 am

    The ones that drive me nuts are the ones that quail at having to take care of people. They want to be managers and tell people how to do their jobs when they haven't ever done the job.

  • 4:56 am

    I have the suspicion that a lot of newer people in the nursing field entered just for the money. Obviously there's nothing wrong with looking out for your economic interests, but I know a lot of people who got into nursing because they wanted a steady paycheck and job security; it had little or nothing to do with wanting to work bedside or lay hands on people.

  • Dec 1

    Quote from SummitRN
    Hmmm... funny I hear plenty of adult care RNs and nursing students make absolute statements about never wanting to go anywhere near a NICU or peds or OB unit in their employment. Nobody wants to condemn them for that.

    We only poo-poo people for not wanting to hop in the Adult Med-Surg trenches.



    OP is willing to move anywhere and work their way up. That sounds like flexibility exactly where it is needed.

    C'mon, how many "I can't find a job new grad RN HELP" threads where do you see where an OP says "and I'm willing to move anywhere and work my way in." Usually it is, "I want day shift OB at one of five hospitals and I've applied to all five HELP!"

    That said, if OP ends up finding NICU not to their liking and retains a dislike for adult care, OP may find nursing isn't for them.

    Certainly why I dislike adults. They annoy the hell out of me and i will NEVER care for them as a RN. I would rather remain unemployed until I find a NICU job. ������

    Actually it wasn't about whether the poster wanted to do Med/Surg or not. It was the way they expressed their disdain for adult patients. "They annoy the hell out of me" is a really negative way of expressing a preference to avoid adult patients. Being unemployed rather than caring for adults also strikes me as a poor attitude, but perhaps the poster has no bills to pay and has someone to support her and doesn't have to worry about such mundane things as food on the table and roof over the head.

    While OP is willing to move anywhere, she/he does not sound particularly flexible in that she/he will remain unemployed (getting NO nursing experience with which to make herself/himself more attractive the hiring managers in the specialty of choice) rather than take employment anywhere except for the one specialty.

    I think the bolded quote from the OP reflects an immature person with a poor attitude. I still think that.

  • Dec 1

    Quote from SummitRN
    Hmmm... funny I hear plenty of adult care RNs and nursing students make absolute statements about never wanting to go anywhere near a NICU or peds or OB unit in their employment. Nobody wants to condemn them for that.

    We only poo-poo people for not wanting to hop in the Adult Med-Surg trenches.



    OP is willing to move anywhere and work their way up. That sounds like flexibility exactly where it is needed.

    C'mon, how many "I can't find a job new grad RN HELP" threads where do you see where an OP says "and I'm willing to move anywhere and work my way in." Usually it is, "I want day shift OB at one of five hospitals and I've applied to all five HELP!"

    That said, if OP ends up finding NICU not to their liking and retains a dislike for adult care, OP may find nursing isn't for them.
    It's not always what you say, but rather how you say it. If I saw a post that said the thought of taking care of babies/peds/OB patients made them sick, I'd have a similar response. It's one thing to have a preference, but entirely another to have a strong aversion (and refusal) to working with any other population. I can, and will continue to "poo poo" those sorts of attitudes.

  • Dec 1

    Quote from Wuzzie
    Doesn't sound like flexibility is the OP's strong suit but who knows.
    Wow! Just WOW! It does indeed sound as though flexibility is not the OP's strong suit. Nor is attitude.

  • Dec 1

    this makes no sense. nobody knows exactly what specialty they can get into in medicine until you actually MATCH. I mean I could say i want to do dermatology in med school but that doesnt mean Ill get it. Have to have good grades, do good on boards, and clerkships then you can reasonably estimate if you can get a certain specialty.

  • Dec 1

    OP you really have no idea how medical school works or matching, do you?

    Lol med students/post grad docs have ZERO or very LITTLE choice where they specialize.

    Matching determines all and you're pretty much bound to it.

  • Dec 1

    Quote from Shookclays
    There's absolutely nothing wrong with comparing the two. If I have a question then it is MY business if I would like it to be discussed.
    But that's like comparing apples to oranges. Doctors study medicine while nurses study nursing.

    Also what is with the attitude? You posted a question & people are giving their piece of mind. Just because you don't agree with it doesn't mean you should be rude.

  • Dec 1

    Quote from Shookclays
    Of course I meant newborns. They are in the category of "infant".
    Technically, they are not. Neonates medically-speaking aren't infants until 1 month (if they're full term). My hospital's NICU is called the NICCU, the Neonatal and Infant Critical Care Unit. So, there is definitely a distinction if you want to work strictly with neonates.

  • Dec 1

    Quote from Shookclays
    Was your experience in the residency program considered "experience" for job placement?
    What do you think a residency is, exactly? You get paid and you work under your own license for however long the residency is and then you step up to an RN I (with a raise -- woohoo!). It's a job. It's the hardest part of the job, IMO, but you're still just like any other employee. I think this is why people are telling you to keep an open mind and be willing to broaden your horizons about things. Calling a residency experience in quotation marks is borderline offensive for those of us working our butts off in residencies. You have so much to learn about just being an RN before thinking you're going to be an NNP ASAP.

  • Dec 1

    Quote from Shookclays
    They aren't shamed for knowing what they want to do with their career early on. It's encouraged.
    And who exactly is it that is "shaming" you?

  • Dec 1

    Overall, the path to med school is an uncertain and expensive journey. They don't exactly write their own tickets. I think you are terribly misinformed.

  • Nov 23

    OP, dude/dudette,...you need to be Lincoln smack.

    Ever heard of the expression "the grass is always greener...?"

    Do you really know how hard it is to find a safe unit for a new nurse? "Safe," as in, there is enough staff (whether you work day or night), there are coworkers who are competent and willing to help you, the training is realistic for a new nurse (no random nonsense like getting multiple preceptors from the jump, or your training is being shortened b/c management is desperate for people), and managers are willing to work with you?

    If your unit is a "safe" unit, then, why would you give up your position and risk going somewhere less pleasant?

    Well, if, and only if, you feel that you can last long on your unit, give them at least 6 months, and have another job secure, before moving on. And, make sure this other job is on a "safe" unit!

    6 months, so you get in somewhere easier. Nowadays, you can find a hospital who would take you with even less than a month experience, but 6 months definitely help with marketability, and getting onto the "right" unit for you.

    So, I agree with Swellz - don't let being viewed as a job hopper prevent you from making a decision. As long as your RN license is clean, and you are willing to relocate, you can find a job.

  • Nov 21

    1. Donald Trump says that we all have the right to affordable, quality healthcare, and he has a plan, a great plan. For one, I'm super curious about this 'great plan' and I can't wait to see what it is. Mind you, I totally don't think it exists, and I don't think he realizes all the intricacies involved, but I'm looking forward to finding out.

    2. Things will go like they are. Actual poor people, the disabled, and the elderly end up with halfway decent socialized medicine subsidized largely by the middle class. YAY Medicare/Medicaid. We've had this limited socialized healthcare my whole life. By we, I mean this country, because I don't get ****.

    3. Rich people will continue to get whatever healthcare they want, because they can afford it with or without insurance.

    4. The middle class gets poorer by paying for government subsidies that don't actually benefit them, and continues to struggle to afford their medical expenditures all around. The majority of us end up with high deductible health plans that MAY benefit us once we reach our max out of pocket (until you realize that your max out of pocket does not cover prescription drug costs, costs of 'elective procedures', and a bunch of other even more ridiculous things. There is no real max out of pocket. They will let you spend as much as you are willing and/or able to.

    And vent time? Obama said my PCP and GYN yearly check ups and pap smears have to be covered by any plan that I choose. I went to my PCP for the first time in several years. I wasn't sick, but I figured, what the hell, it's free, right? No, his office managed to bill me for a physical as well as a well visit (for the same 20 minute appointment?) so yeah, one of those two got covered, the other didn't, and I still paid over 100 dollars for my yearly visit. My doctor's cash rate is $94. It would have been cheaper for me to lie and tell my PCP that I don't have insurance when I visited his office, and paid the cash rate. Let's all let that one reverberate a little bit.

    Because years ago we made it illegal to turn away a woman in active labor in the Emergency Room, that has somehow spun completely out of control to the point where we are not allowed to turn away any street urchin that stumbles into the ER weekly for their weekly fall/non-cardiac chest pain/dilaudid fix/attention/turkey sandwich, and we are penalized if it's not the BEST DAMN TURKEY SANDWICH they have EVER ENJOYED, WITH A SMILE, and WITHIN 15 minutes of arrival. Our country spends too much on healthcare because we don't know where to draw the line, and we can't support our Nurses and Doctors, the front-line experts if you will, so they practice CYA medicine with a smile. I admitted a patient last night with an 'NSTEMI' (read: anxiety. No bump in enzymes after 12h and 2 sets in ED, no EKG changes). She received a 2 view CXR ($400+) and head CT ($1,200) in Emergency room. She received a 2 day ICU stay (4k/day). She received a cardiac catheterization ($9,200) that was not clinically indicated. She has bullied her way into a MRI for a subacute, incidental finding on her CT scan (neurosurgery said she didn't need an MRI). Anyway, another $1,200. So that's a minimum of $16,000 that this one woman racked up in 2 days. Don't worry, she won't be paying it. The best part? She comes every 2 weeks. So even when she's just turned away from the ER after repeating labs, cxr, and head ct EVERY TWO WEEKS, that's $1,600 for the ER visit plus $1,600 in testing. $3,200 a visit. Multiply that by her average 25 visits over the last year: $80k in unnecessary visits to the ER and SOME of the testing that they do on her every damn time. So even if she only managed to get admitted once this year (and I know it was at least 3 times but now I'm just getting mad) our total tax burden for this one individual is around $100k YEARLY. And there is NOTHING MEDICALLY WRONG WITH HER EXCEPT SHE NEEDS A VALIUM (but doesn't have access to a PCP to give her some). All I want is to see my PCP for 20 minutes once a year, but I pay more to do that than this fine individual. If you'll excuse me now, I need a valium. Or the whole bottle.

  • Nov 21

    Don't forget that the reason the ACA was imperfect was because Obama was blocked at nearly every turn by the Republicans! If they had been able to implement it properly it would have been much more successful.


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