New male nursing student

  1. 0
    Hello everyone, I just signed up here because I am starting a LPN program at my local career technology center. I was just accepted last week and classes start in December. I absolutely cannot wait, I've been waiting for this for so long. Just wondering what I should expect? I am very interested in caring for people and love the healthcare held. My ultimate goal is to become a nurse practitioner of pediatrics!
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  4. 3
    First of all congratulations on being accepted to a nursing program!

    I am in an RN program right now and my program is over in April 2013. I have been in a little over a year. Basically, the best advice I can give is to read EVERYTHING assigned. Do not skimp in chapters. If your instructors use powerpoints. Print them out and read that chapter and annotate those PPT slides before you go to class. If you try to just swing by on PPTs alone, it will be reallllllly hard.

    Do your best not to stress. Make friends with the "smart people" in the class. They are a really valuable resource. Do not get involved in any school drama, it just makes for a bad school environment. TRUST ME. I am drama-free in my school. I am considered Switzerland. I am friends with just about everyone in my program, and people just vent to me about whoever and I just shrug it off...

    Same cliche things too. Get enough sleep before class/clinical rotations. Eat a good breakfast. If you are studying for a test. DO NOT cram the night before. Go over a few things before class. Try reading flash cards before you go to bed. Our dean told us to do that, and it reallllly helps.

    FLASHCARDS = AMAZING!!

    Make as many flashcards as you can, bring them to the grocery store. Purposely stand in the LONGEST line for check out and pull your cards out. Bring them or like 20-30 wherever you go and just read them in your spare time. If you are a passenger in a car, bring them a long...IT REALLLLLLLLLLLLLLLY HELPS!!

    Good luck in your studies!!!

    Sean
    questioningRN, tenjuna, and Jattix like this.
  5. 0
    Quote from seanynjboy
    First of all congratulations on being accepted to a nursing program!

    I am in an RN program right now and my program is over in April 2013. I have been in a little over a year. Basically, the best advice I can give is to read EVERYTHING assigned. Do not skimp in chapters. If your instructors use powerpoints. Print them out and read that chapter and annotate those PPT slides before you go to class. If you try to just swing by on PPTs alone, it will be reallllllly hard.

    Do your best not to stress. Make friends with the "smart people" in the class. They are a really valuable resource. Do not get involved in any school drama, it just makes for a bad school environment. TRUST ME. I am drama-free in my school. I am considered Switzerland. I am friends with just about everyone in my program, and people just vent to me about whoever and I just shrug it off...

    Same cliche things too. Get enough sleep before class/clinical rotations. Eat a good breakfast. If you are studying for a test. DO NOT cram the night before. Go over a few things before class. Try reading flash cards before you go to bed. Our dean told us to do that, and it reallllly helps.

    FLASHCARDS = AMAZING!!

    Make as many flashcards as you can, bring them to the grocery store. Purposely stand in the LONGEST line for check out and pull your cards out. Bring them or like 20-30 wherever you go and just read them in your spare time. If you are a passenger in a car, bring them a long...IT REALLLLLLLLLLLLLLLY HELPS!!

    Good luck in your studies!!!

    Sean
    Sounds like some good advice to me. I too am a huge fan of flash cards.
  6. 0
    WOW....great advice!!! I start my RN program this fall. I will definitely take your advice bro!!! Thanks!!!
  7. 1
    One thing I will throw in.... buy a pocket recorder, to record lectures. That way you can listen again to the lecture, it clears up questions you may come across in your readings, at least it worked for me, and you can listen to them when your driving.
    ringmasterjdp likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from Pick01
    One thing I will throw in.... buy a pocket recorder, to record lectures. That way you can listen again to the lecture, it clears up questions you may come across in your readings, at least it worked for me, and you can listen to them when your driving.
    I have to get one. My instructors next 2 semesters do not allow laptops in class...that makes me rather upset. I have to buy a recorder now.
  9. 0
    welcome buddy
  10. 0
    I was an LPN before I was an RN. In NH, we have something called NCLEX challenge where RN students are eligible to sit for the LPN exam depending on your program/ for me, it was at the end of my second years second semester. I agree with Sean, he and I sound very much alike. One thing in particular I noticed was once I completed my Med/Surg rotation, it seemed like the program was a bit easier- only a bit- because MS is the foundation, once you understand how the body works, for some reason even if I was not sure of an answer on a test in pedi, using my MS knowledge helped me break down questions.... LPN school is intense, so, like me, work you but off in MS, it will pay off. In regards to taking a recorder to class, I never found that helpful..... Its strange laptops are not allowed, especially now? I am adjunct faculty now and when I teach, I ALWAYS use an NCLEX review book as a guide to teaching to ensure I touch on points that will be relevant for my students. One thing that I did was I purchased a NCLEX review book and when I studied, I also reviewed/quizzed myself using the review book, which helped.... And, if you can help it, make friends with students you get some good vibes from, ones that will be their to help you and vice versa. I think I got through my BSN because on the first day, I connects with two other students, so we always had each other to fall back on, study together etc... It's vital, bc missing a class could mean missing the renal system for example. Lastly, my school, gave us notes to follow in class so we did not have to write them all out and we could participate easier, I have severe ADD and assignments like "read chaperts 1-7, pages 6 through 192" was NOT helpful, I was lost after ten minutes. Many instructors cover the main points via their lecture, and for me, I studied my notes and read all chapter summaries.
    Im no genius, I barelly graduated HS, but nursing has been my niche... I was Salutatorian of my class, so my methods seemed to pay off, but you must find what works for you too... OH, and the LPN exam compared to RN, was 100 times easier.... Take things day by day, time managment- with ADD- I cannot sit and read for three hours or study for two hours. I used to study for 25-30 minutes take a break, then go back, and I absorbed info much easier... Hope this helps? good luck!
  11. 0
    see my post- good luck!
    Quote from seanynjboy
    First of all congratulations on being accepted to a nursing program!

    I am in an RN program right now and my program is over in April 2013. I have been in a little over a year. Basically, the best advice I can give is to read EVERYTHING assigned. Do not skimp in chapters. If your instructors use powerpoints. Print them out and read that chapter and annotate those PPT slides before you go to class. If you try to just swing by on PPTs alone, it will be reallllllly hard.

    Do your best not to stress. Make friends with the "smart people" in the class. They are a really valuable resource. Do not get involved in any school drama, it just makes for a bad school environment. TRUST ME. I am drama-free in my school. I am considered Switzerland. I am friends with just about everyone in my program, and people just vent to me about whoever and I just shrug it off...

    Same cliche things too. Get enough sleep before class/clinical rotations. Eat a good breakfast. If you are studying for a test. DO NOT cram the night before. Go over a few things before class. Try reading flash cards before you go to bed. Our dean told us to do that, and it reallllly helps.

    FLASHCARDS = AMAZING!!

    Make as many flashcards as you can, bring them to the grocery store. Purposely stand in the LONGEST line for check out and pull your cards out. Bring them or like 20-30 wherever you go and just read them in your spare time. If you are a passenger in a car, bring them a long...IT REALLLLLLLLLLLLLLLY HELPS!!

    Good luck in your studies!!!

    Sean
  12. 0
    Congrats on starting nursing school dude! I can honestly say that I have had a great experience as a male student nurse. No one has ever made me feel as anything other than a valuable member of a team. I started at 18 years old and have learned so much. I am 20 now and will graduate in May of 2013, and I have found that nursing requires flexibility on the students part. Know your learning style. For example, I am multi-modal learner, but learn best from auditory input and writing. So I record lectures (if allowed by institution) and listen to them in the car, while waiting in the doctors office and I write out outlines and concepts maps on the material i found difficulty to understand. I also learn well by discussing the information reviewed in class in study-groups that are small (3-4 people). If i go to a study group I make sure I don't go to it as a empty vessel, I try to study and bring something to the group, as all study group members should try to do.

    If you have a smart-phone, put it to good use and download apps like micromedex, epocrates, and various other nclex and nursing apps. Also, the Nursing Made Incredibly East series is great for brief summaries of difficult concepts, they have a fundamentals, med-surg, pharm, critical care, and various other versions of the book.

    Finally, I suggest getting a Tarascon pharmacopeia classic for Nurses book. It gives good nursing specific information regarding medication administration.


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