Can I handle working/LPN school?

  1. 0
    I am reluctant to not work at ALL, because I am going from working full-time to going to school. But I haven't been in LPN school before so I don't know. My program is 18 months, 3 hours a day for the first part and then switches to 2 days of clinicals and 3 days of classroom after 9 months (I think).

    I would like to TRY to work 24 hours a week. I work at a walk-in health center I could work 4 six hour shifts a week...do u think this is realistic?

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  2. 17 Comments...

  3. 0
    The school I attended in the 19080's was ten months, M-F, 40 hours per week, with at least 10 more hours of homework. You could not get less than a "C" on any test or project, or bye-bye. You could net get an "A" on any test or project, if a single word was spelled incorrectly. You were only allowed to miss 2 full days, or you were expelled. But- they also a had a point system, like- if you were 10 minutes late to any class, you were docked 1/4 day, as absent. Fifty five of us started, I think 26 graduated. And none of the others were refunded any of their tution when they were expelled. FUN!
  4. 0
    Working while doing nursing school is not recommended. its tough and you need to spend alot of hours outside of class to study, study, study. I wouldn't have been able to do it, however, I had classmates who did only because they had circumstances and they made it. If you feel you will be able to handle it, go for it, since you say you dont start that full schedule till 9months into the program? But if you could afford to not work, I suggest you not work.
  5. 0
    In the early 80's, when I went to LPN school, we were not permitted to work at any time during the 12 month program. When we were in our 2nd and 3rd trimesters, we were allowed to work during the times we were on break from school, i.e. Thanksgiving, Christmas and 2 weeks in the summer, but no more than 20 hours. I was fortunate and did not need to work when school was in session. I know many nursing students who worked full time plus took care of their families and made it through. I agree with the other poster...if you don't have to work, don't. Good luck!
  6. 3
    My LVN program is Monday-Friday 7am-3pm I work

    Friday 10:30pm-6:30a
    Saturday 10:30a-6:30a and
    Every other Sunday 10:30pm-6:30am. or some weeks I will do

    Thursday 10:30pm-6:30a
    Friday 10:30pm-6:30a
    Saturday 10:30a-6:30a

    I only do every other Sunday or an occasional Thursday because when I work that shift I go right from work to school and thats 24 hours of no sleep. It sounds bad but its really not. I have the most awesome graveyard shift! I work adolescent mental health (I'm also a CNA). When I get to work all the kids are sleeping and I leave before they wake up. Other then doing bed checks every 30 min and maybe throwing in a load of laundry and loading the dishwasher, I don't do anything but homework. I write papers, study drug cards, do NCLEX review (I bring my laptop) and watch youtube videos on body systems and medical stuff. Since it't mental health we have an LVN or RN on staff every night o its usally just me and her which is even more awesome because she helps me study. During the week I spend maybe an hour a day reviewing (if that) since most of my reading and studying is done a head of time.

    During the week I'm in bed by 8pm so I average 8-9 hours of sleep a night so I'm well rested which makes pulling a 24 hour shift every other week no bad at all. I am also PRN so I can set my own schedule. If I need more hour I just let them know and I can work. If I decided I need to put back I just need to finish out the shift I picked up then just not take any more. During periods like spring break or Christmas break I can work full time days or night if I want.

    So yes, short answer, working and going to LVN school is totally possible (and this coming from a single mom with little to NO support system). You just need to find the right job. I would strongly suggest looking into mental health, residential group homes or overnight in home CNA (although this is going to pay WAY less). Try to go PRN because it pay more and you can set your on schedule. Good luck
    Last edit by pnkgirl25 on Mar 23, '13
  7. 0
    Quote from SuzieVN
    The school I attended in the 19080's was ten months, M-F, 40 hours per week, with at least 10 more hours of homework. You could not get less than a "C" on any test or project, or bye-bye. You could net get an "A" on any test or project, if a single word was spelled incorrectly. You were only allowed to miss 2 full days, or you were expelled. But- they also a had a point system, like- if you were 10 minutes late to any class, you were docked 1/4 day, as absent. Fifty five of us started, I think 26 graduated. And none of the others were refunded any of their tution when they were expelled. FUN!
    This sounds like my school EXACTLY. its also a 10 month program. We started with 45 and are hovering at 28 I think right now.
  8. 0
    The LVN program I attended was 12 months long, almost 40 hours weekly, five days per week. And you know what? About half the students in the class worked at least part time.

    Many of my classmates worked the 11pm to 7am shift at local nursing homes and assisted living facilities, and after getting off work, would arrive to school at 8:30am. It's manageable if you want it to work. Good luck to you.
  9. 0
    In our class about half of the students worked. Some were on a "scholarship" that paid all their expenses (I went to a tuition-free school, but did not cover books, uniforms, etc), and in return they were required to work weekends at the sponsoring nursing home. It was a very good program because it also paid a weekly living stipend. We went to school from 8 AM- 2:30 PM Monday through Friday and we had very stringent attendance policies as well. It's doable if necessary, but I would suggest going PRN if you don't need the set schedule and/or benefits. You'll make your own schedule and more money which may be of greater value to you as you get a better feel for the studying time necessary for you to be successful with nursing school.

    I graduated in 2005 and my 10 month program was full time, as I mentioned before. I had 3 children under 2 at the time. I could have NEVER worked while in school. Conversely, my husband's cousin just graduated from a part-time LPN program this past February. She just sat her boards and passed. She has 3 children from 2-12 and she worked full time as a medical assistant. Her program offered a lot of online resources and classes, however, which allowed her more flexibility than our program did. I think newer programs are offering way more flexibility that would make working part- or even full time more doable. What kind of program are you going to be in?
    Last edit by HisTreasure on Mar 23, '13 : Reason: Afterthought
  10. 0
    You'll hear people tell you that you can do it, and people DO do it, but the ones in my class who work, even just one day a week, are the ones who are struggling and barely hanging on by their fingernails. We have lost five people so far, and 4 of them tried to hold jobs during school.
  11. 0
    My program is 10 months long, we have about two months left. When I started school I was working about 15 hours a week and I was third in my class. But I also studied every chance I got. Now in second semester I am still part time but I work once a week for four hours just to help my job out, I actually put in my notice and they asked me to stay on at least one day and possibly fill in for people if someone called in. It's so much more manageable now because I have more time! It definitely was hard when working more. I am still at the top of my class, but I see others who work that are struggling just to keep up and they are tired all the time. You can always try and see if you can handle it. Good luck!


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