anatomy questions

  1. 0 I live in Tennessee. Does anyone know how in depth the skeletal system is? ie..do we have to learn all the bones or just certain ones? also what would you suggest studying to get a heads up on Anatomy?
  2. Visit  tnlpn8 profile page

    About tnlpn8

    49 Years Old; Joined Feb '09; Posts: 18; Likes: 4.

    20 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  Ms Future Nursie profile page
    1
    we not only have to learn ALL 206 bones, but we have to know all the markings and processing of each bone. I use this sight to help me study. It's all memorization really.
    http://www.gwc.maricopa.edu/class/bio201/skeleton.htm
    fwardlaw147 likes this.
  4. Visit  Daytonite profile page
    0
    plan on learning them all. how sad it makes me that a new person to the field already looks for shortcuts to something important to the study of our profession. we need to know the bones because many other structures of the body are named and located by their relation to the various bones. how out of the loop one will be when they don't know this information.

    there are anatomy and physiology weblinks on post #44 of this sticky thread: http://allnurses.com/nursing-student...gy-145201.html - pathophysiology/ a & p/ microbiology/ fluid & electrolyte resources
  5. Visit  shawna2bnurse profile page
    0
    Daytonite you should know that the person who wrote that post is my friend and we are not looking for a shortcut. We are just trying to get ahead before ourclass starts in May. We are learning things on our own before class so I find that far from taking a shortcut.
  6. Visit  dblpn profile page
    0
    Quote from tnlpn8
    I live in Tennessee. Does anyone know how in depth the skeletal system is? ie..do we have to learn all the bones or just certain ones? also what would you suggest studying to get a heads up on Anatomy?
    plan on learning all of the systems of the body. unfortunatly, there are no shortcuts in studying the human body for nursing. i've had A&P before and now i have to take it again for my LPN. believe me, i didnt want to go through all of it again, but they couldnt accept previous courses when you're going for LPN. its like five of us in my class with previous college courses and it aint worth a hill of beans for an LPN program.
  7. Visit  butterfly135 profile page
    0
    yes plan on learning all of it i used the book get ready for a@p as a
    head start before i started anatomy and physiology this semester it really helped. good luck!
  8. Visit  ZanatuBelmont profile page
    0
    Quote from tnlpn8
    I live in Tennessee. Does anyone know how in depth the skeletal system is? ie..do we have to learn all the bones or just certain ones? also what would you suggest studying to get a heads up on Anatomy?
    We - as in my nursing class in Texas - did not go in depth with the skeletal system. Instead, we looked at disorders AFFECTING the skeletal system. You should brush up on your anatomy for the skeletal system. Learn how it should move, why it moves, what happens if it doesn't move, etc. That will give you a quick boost when you study musculoskeletal disorders.
  9. Visit  tnlpn8 profile page
    1
    Dear Daytonite,

    If you knew how hard I have been trying to get ahead of the game you would feel really bad for what you said about me. I was simply asking what I need to be studying. My study partner and I have been studying so hard to try and get a head start. We don't even start class until May 4th. Before you imply that someone is looking for an easy way out, you should actually know the situation. I beleive My study partner and I are probably doing more than necessary to make sure we will be, informed and capable students and in turn be informed and capable Nurses. Compassion is also a very large part of being a sucessful nurse, That includes compassion for nursing student's. Just remember you were once a nursing student. How would you feel if some said to you what you said to me?
    letarn2b likes this.
  10. Visit  Daytonite profile page
    0
    The thought going through my brain at the time was, "why would you think that the rest of the country might be learning A&P differently?" Then, I thought "wouldn't anyone, especially someone new and excited about going into nursing [you are new and excited about going into nursing, aren't you?] want to learn everything there was to know about bones?"

    I think you ought to look at my post again. I gave you an excellent resource as well. Did you even look at it? It is a huge list of A&P websites which I periodically check to make sure the sites are active and I occasionally add new ones that I find. Had I not cared I wouldn't have bothered to direct you to where they were located.

    The definition of compassion, by the way, is feeling sympathy for the suffering of others and having the urge to help them and I certainly do that, so thank you for your understanding.
  11. Visit  tnlpn8 profile page
    0
    Quote from Daytonite
    The thought going through my brain at the time was, "why would you think that the rest of the country might be learning A&P differently?" Then, I thought "wouldn't anyone, especially someone new and excited about going into nursing [you are new and excited about going into nursing, aren't you?] want to learn everything there was to know about bones?"

    I think you ought to look at my post again. I gave you an excellent resource as well. Did you even look at it? It is a huge list of A&P websites which I periodically check to make sure the sites are active and I occasionally add new ones that I find. Had I not cared I wouldn't have bothered to direct you to where they were located.

    The definition of compassion, by the way, is feeling sympathy for the suffering of others and having the urge to help them and I certainly do that, so thank you for your understanding.
    If I wasn't excited,Why would I be asking questions? Thank you for your apology.
  12. Visit  matchsticktgt profile page
    0
    I couldn't get the links to open...is the post still valid? (my ** laptop hates to open links, so that may be on my end)
  13. Visit  HeyHeyitsMaay profile page
    3
    The very first thing we had to learn in anatomy was all of the bones. Somehow, we did it. If it's any consolation, I didn't understand the language used when we were asked on our very first anatomy test about the bones of the skull, and FAILED IT even though I knew all of them.

    It wasn't until we started going over each system and the relation of structure to function with respect to disease process that it really made sense to me. Your best bet is to break EACH AREA up into chunks. Start at the skull and work your way down. Focus 2-3 days or so on just the skull, to include all of the sutures.

    Break it up further by learning the bones of the ear separate, and go from there. The whole purpose is to learn the STRUCTURE so that when the time comes, you can understand what happens when it doesn't FUNCTION. Also someone else posted about learning the broader concepts associated w/the skeletal system. That is so, so intelligent. Teach yourself about things like the bursae synovial fluid. Very basic things, that way it won't seem as overwhelming as it does right now. Consider this: If you know that synovial fluid lubricates the joints, when you see considerable swelling, or hear a patient say that their knee or shoulder "pops" when it moves, you can narrow down the fundamental cause because you know that there is synovial fluid between the joints, and it's purpose. (Not that our job is to diagnose in any shape or form, but we do need to know what's going on).

    Knowing WHY the structure is there, and HOW it works, enables you to use critical thinking to come up with missing pieces in many cases, at least it does for me.

    So look at it from a different angle. If you know that the femur contains yellow marrow, then you know that a fat embolus can occur with trauma. It's like a mystery to me. That's how I approach what we're learning. We know how the disease process works if we know the structure of what the disease is affecting.
    See? Knowing what it does and how it functions enables you to learn much better.
    Last edit by HeyHeyitsMaay on Apr 10, '09 : Reason: I said white marrow instead of yellow :D
    Tonyapate, fwardlaw147, and tnlpn8 like this.
  14. Visit  tnlpn8 profile page
    0
    Thanks, that helped alot!


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